Master of Arts
in Holistic Health Education
Holistic Nutrition

19.6%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in CA

14.5%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in U.S. 2014

Ways to Learn

  • Hybrid
  • Online

Quick Facts

  • 2-Years Full-Time
  • 3 Years Part-Time
  • 65 Units
  • Evening Option

Campus Location

Overview

The Specialization in Holistic Nutrition requires completion of 24 units, 13 of which are core units embedded in the MA in Holistic Health Education curriculum, and 11 of which are electives. (NOTE: Because we only require 5 units of electives, the specialization students end up taking a total of 65 rather than 59 units to get all 11 of the elective units required for the specialization.)

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Highlights

  • Unique nutritional expertise embedded within the field of health education
  • Emphasis on food as a healing modality
  • Students learn to customize their nutritional approach for each client

Students enrolled in the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition evaluate multiple nutritional approaches and dietary theories, analyzing the benefits and deficits of each approach as applied to the individual.

Throughout the course of study, students apply the theme of food as a healing modality in a range of ways, from addressing imbalances that occur throughout an individual’s lifetime to developing nutritional and herbal approaches to common disease states including heart disease, diabetes and dysglycemia, cancer, and autoimmune conditions. The concepts of nourishment and creating health within imbalance and disease states are also explored.

Finally, the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition reaches beyond holism as applied to the individual to implications in global food systems and environmental influences on individual and community health.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

As a result of completing the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition, graduates are able to:

  • Choose nutritional approaches and demonstrate understanding of theory, issues, health information, research, and applications in the field of nutrition
  • Explain in clear language basic philosophies of holistic nutrition and application of nutritional therapies
  • Practice professionally as a nutrition educator, instructor, and consultant as well as an integrative/holistic health educator
  • Embody a healthy approach to nutrition and nourishment, and model health through food and nutrition in one’s own community

Specialization Electives

The MA degree can be completed in 7 quarters if students start in the fall quarter. However, students pursuing the Holistic Nutrition Specialization and/or the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching will need at least one additional quarter to complete the required electives.

Electives
Units
HHE 5910 Dietary Planning
1
Students will develop the skills and practical experience necessary to develop customized diet and meal plans. Different approaches to diet development and meal planning will be covered. Students will learn how to develop meal plans and food charts for a variety of dietary approaches such as a cleansing diet, calorie controlled diets, vegetarian diets, vegan diets, Paleo, Ketogenic, etc. Diets for several common health issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5911 Nutritional Consultation Business Practices
1
This course is designed to train students how to build, run, and market their own nutrition consulting practice. Nutrition consulting has become an increasingly viable and growing option for nutrition professionals. Whether planning to open their own practice, work for another health professional, or work as a health educator within a corporate setting, students need the skills to create their own practice within a practice. In this course, students gain a clear understanding of the consulting process and learn to recognize their own strengths as a consultant and to define and establish a strategic direction, as well as tips on running an office, setting fees, insurance needs, and developing an overall business plan and marketing strategy. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5912 Nutritional Consultation and Coaching
2
The focus of this course is effective nutrition counseling including the skills needed for building rapport, listening and interviewing skills, including motivational interviewing, and working with clients through various states of change. Blending together counseling and coaching techniques, students will learn how to identify key areas of intervention to maximize client’s success and how to engage with clients in a collaborative manner to co-create a dietary plan that works. Prerequisites: HHE 5750, HHE 5772.
HHE 5913 Nutrition for Healing Body and Mind
4
Nutritional approaches for working with clients with conditions such as diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, allergies, depression, heart disease and cancer are addressed in this course. This course introduces the foods, ways of eating, nutritional therapies and dietary approaches that help to bring about and maintain the most vibrant health with regard to gastrointestinal health, diabetes, allergies, autoimmune disease, depression, cancer and heart disease. This course will explore some of the underlying causes, nutritional deficiencies and lifestyle factors that contribute to these health conditions. Nutritional and herbal approaches for high cholesterol, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, food allergies, asthma, and breast cancer will also be discussed. Emphasis is on promoting and maintaining wellness. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5914 Holistic Approaches to Weight and Health
1
Approaches to weight management are examined, including an alternative model of looking at weight and size – Health At Every Size®. The psychology behind issues related to nourishment and poor body image are considered in this course, along with socio-cultural factors that influence weight and health. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5915 Farm to Table
2
A thorough examination and analysis of the complete food chain will serve as a means of determining how and why our food supply may or may not supply healthy choices for any of us. Food production begins in the earth and continues through many necessary and sometimes unnecessary processes. This class will look at farming practices; to include the fundamentals of soil examination, soil enhancement, ecological effects on soil health, soil degradation, political soil extortion, the many types of farming from the large industrial farming system to small organic biodynamic farms, the kinds of fertilizing of soil and plants, the status and implementation of the water supply needed for agriculture to remain sustainable, harvesting, transporting, and finally the distribution and the profit motivated practices of getting the food to the consumer. This understanding is critical to offering sound, uncomplicated, appropriate, and healthy “food” knowledge and nutritional advice.
HHE 5920 Coaching Experiential
0.5-2.0
A seminar with variable units that enables faculty and students to create an active coaching community among those pursuing the Certificate at any given time. Faculty and students meet as needed to introduce cutting edge topics in coaching, report on new research and developments, and provide extra coaching practice as needed.
HHE 5922 Coaching Practicum B
1
Students are observed coaching and receive detailed feedback from a coaching mentor. Written and practical examinations are administered as the final step in obtaining the Coaching Certificate or Specialization (depending on student’s program). Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5924 Health, Disease, & Wellbeing for Health Coaches
1
Conventional medicine is compared to holistic concepts of health and wellbeing. Conventional risk factors and common chronic diseases are covered. Emphasis will be placed on holistic, health-promoting approaches such wellness wheels, continuums, salutogenesis, and similar wellness models. MA Students may substitute HHE 5710.
HHE 5926 Mind-Body Connection for Health Coaches
1
Students explore the field of mind-body medicine, including psychoneuroimmunology, integrative health, and whole-person approaches. Key topics of interest to health coaches are covered, including self-care practices, nutrition, spirituality, embodiment, and ecotherapy. MA Students may substitute HHE 5823.
Electives
Units
HHE 5928 Change Theory for Coaches
1
This course looks at what motivates people to make sustainable changes in their lives. Key change theories, such as the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and Self-Determination Theory, are explored. Coaching students explore how they can use these theories and models to help their clients realize their goals and achieve lasting change. MA Students may substitute HHE 5756.
HHE 5930 Weight and Body Image for Coaches
1
Individuals frequently seek out health and wellness coaches to lose weight and/or change their body shape/size. However, the evidence is overwhelming that weight-loss diets are ineffective long-term and often harmful. Moreover, body dissatisfaction is a growing and insidious problem in U.S. culture. In this course, health coaches learn how to work from a “do no harm” perspective to promote these clients’ long-term health and wellbeing. Coaches will also learn how to recognize more serious conditions, such as depression, eating disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder, as well as how to refer appropriately. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5932 Stress Management for Health Coaches
1
Stress may be the defining characteristic of 21st century life; no one is immune. Because every client is different though, health coaches need to understand stress and how it can affect us, and to appreciate the myriad of ways there are to manage it. This course examines the physiological, mental, and spiritual effects of stress before turning to a variety of holistic approaches to stress management that coaches will find useful in their practice. MA Students may substitute HHE 5842.
HHE 5934 Supervised Community Coaching
1-2
Coaching certificate students will gain valuable experience coaching under the supervision of experienced coaches. Variable units: 1-2 per quarter. Students are required to take 2 units total. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5940 Energy Models of Healing
2
This course investigates how health, illness, wholeness and healing may be defined and worked with in energy terms. The coursework involves in-depth inquiry into the many disciplines and traditions that contribute to energy healing as well as an analysis of the concepts and philosophies upon which these systems are based. We look at energy medicine from the perspectives of quantum physicists, biologists, consciousness and psi researchers, philosophers, spiritual healers, and medical intuitives. We will also investigate how energy modalities are viewed by mainstream medicine.
HHE 5941 Asian Approaches to Health and Healing
2
Two of the oldest holistic systems of medicine—Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine—are presented in this survey course. Their basic philosophy, principles, and standards of treatment will be explored both didactically and experientially. The course will not focus on comparing the two systems, but the diversities of each will be outlined with emphasis on their spiritual roots, cultural and social perspectives, and their growing appeal as global alternatives in health care.
HHE 5942 Arts in Healthcare
1
This course is an overview of the powerful role that the arts can play in fostering well-being and wholeness. Research is documenting connections between creative engagement and pain management, stress reduction, recovery and resilience. We will explore the writing, visual arts, theater and music programs being used within hospitals, healthcare facilities, and communities. Experiential creative exercises will allow participants to experience their own movement toward a fuller living experience. Coursework includes meditative practices and creative processes including the use of visual art, movement, and writing. No art experience is necessary. The course is focused on internal growth and development of the individual. Each student will apply the course content to their own personal and professional needs.
HHE 5943 Functional Nutrition Blood Chemistry
1
Designing an effective nutrition program is dependent on the establishment of an accurate nutritional profile guided by scientific approaches such as a comprehensive blood test. There is no test more accepted, efficient and affordable than a comprehensive blood chemistry profile. By learning how to interpret blood chemistry from a nutritional perspective, you can detect the shifts in physiological function and use it in a more preventative manner. Designing a truly individualized nutrition program will produce a more efficient and longer lasting result than just addressing one symptom or effect of the imbalance. You will also easily be able to track the effectiveness of any nutrition program. In this practicum you will learn the basics of nutritional blood chemistry and how to identify some common patterns of imbalance and how to develop a customized nutrition program based on the results.
HHE 5944 Nutrition for Women’s Health
1
As women are living longer than ever, it is important for women to address their health so that they can remain vital and thrive throughout the life cycle. A woman’s health profile can dramatically change from one decade to the next. In this class students will learn about using diet, lifestyle and nutrients to balance hormones throughout life. We will also discuss the relationship of blood sugar metabolism, stress, thyroid health, inflammation and gut health to fertility, weight issues, mood shifts, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, fibroids, perimenopause, osteoporosis and menopause.
HHE 5945 Transitions & Grief
1
One of the most important functions of a health educator or health coach is to help clients navigate transitions and transformative change. Too often, we forget that a key element of many kinds of change is releasing our attachment to past ways of being and going through an appropriate grieving process. Students will learn about different approaches to coping with grief and how they can support clients who find themselves grieving various types of loss.
Electives
Units
HHE 5928 Change Theory for Coaches
1
This course looks at what motivates people to make sustainable changes in their lives. Key change theories, such as the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and Self-Determination Theory, are explored. Coaching students explore how they can use these theories and models to help their clients realize their goals and achieve lasting change. MA Students may substitute HHE 5756.
HHE 5930 Weight and Body Image for Coaches
1
Individuals frequently seek out health and wellness coaches to lose weight and/or change their body shape/size. However, the evidence is overwhelming that weight-loss diets are ineffective long-term and often harmful. Moreover, body dissatisfaction is a growing and insidious problem in U.S. culture. In this course, health coaches learn how to work from a “do no harm” perspective to promote these clients’ long-term health and wellbeing. Coaches will also learn how to recognize more serious conditions, such as depression, eating disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder, as well as how to refer appropriately. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5932 Stress Management for Health Coaches
1
Stress may be the defining characteristic of 21st century life; no one is immune. Because every client is different though, health coaches need to understand stress and how it can affect us, and to appreciate the myriad of ways there are to manage it. This course examines the physiological, mental, and spiritual effects of stress before turning to a variety of holistic approaches to stress management that coaches will find useful in their practice. MA Students may substitute HHE 5842.
HHE 5934 Supervised Community Coaching
1-2
Coaching certificate students will gain valuable experience coaching under the supervision of experienced coaches. Variable units: 1-2 per quarter. Students are required to take 2 units total. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5940 Energy Models of Healing
2
This course investigates how health, illness, wholeness and healing may be defined and worked with in energy terms. The coursework involves in-depth inquiry into the many disciplines and traditions that contribute to energy healing as well as an analysis of the concepts and philosophies upon which these systems are based. We look at energy medicine from the perspectives of quantum physicists, biologists, consciousness and psi researchers, philosophers, spiritual healers, and medical intuitives. We will also investigate how energy modalities are viewed by mainstream medicine.
HHE 5941 Asian Approaches to Health and Healing
2
Two of the oldest holistic systems of medicine—Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine—are presented in this survey course. Their basic philosophy, principles, and standards of treatment will be explored both didactically and experientially. The course will not focus on comparing the two systems, but the diversities of each will be outlined with emphasis on their spiritual roots, cultural and social perspectives, and their growing appeal as global alternatives in health care.
HHE 5942 Arts in Healthcare
1
This course is an overview of the powerful role that the arts can play in fostering well-being and wholeness. Research is documenting connections between creative engagement and pain management, stress reduction, recovery and resilience. We will explore the writing, visual arts, theater and music programs being used within hospitals, healthcare facilities, and communities. Experiential creative exercises will allow participants to experience their own movement toward a fuller living experience. Coursework includes meditative practices and creative processes including the use of visual art, movement, and writing. No art experience is necessary. The course is focused on internal growth and development of the individual. Each student will apply the course content to their own personal and professional needs.
HHE 5943 Functional Nutrition Blood Chemistry
1
Designing an effective nutrition program is dependent on the establishment of an accurate nutritional profile guided by scientific approaches such as a comprehensive blood test. There is no test more accepted, efficient and affordable than a comprehensive blood chemistry profile. By learning how to interpret blood chemistry from a nutritional perspective, you can detect the shifts in physiological function and use it in a more preventative manner. Designing a truly individualized nutrition program will produce a more efficient and longer lasting result than just addressing one symptom or effect of the imbalance. You will also easily be able to track the effectiveness of any nutrition program. In this practicum you will learn the basics of nutritional blood chemistry and how to identify some common patterns of imbalance and how to develop a customized nutrition program based on the results.
HHE 5944 Nutrition for Women’s Health
1
As women are living longer than ever, it is important for women to address their health so that they can remain vital and thrive throughout the life cycle. A woman’s health profile can dramatically change from one decade to the next. In this class students will learn about using diet, lifestyle and nutrients to balance hormones throughout life. We will also discuss the relationship of blood sugar metabolism, stress, thyroid health, inflammation and gut health to fertility, weight issues, mood shifts, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, fibroids, perimenopause, osteoporosis and menopause.
HHE 5945 Transitions & Grief
1
One of the most important functions of a health educator or health coach is to help clients navigate transitions and transformative change. Too often, we forget that a key element of many kinds of change is releasing our attachment to past ways of being and going through an appropriate grieving process. Students will learn about different approaches to coping with grief and how they can support clients who find themselves grieving various types of loss.

If you’re here, you’ve already begun.

BA Legal Studies
Concentration in Advanced
Legal Technology

82%

of Graduates Working in Legal Field within a Month Post-Grad

30%+

Number of Program Alum that Move on to Law School After-Grad

100%

Faculty are Practicing Attorneys

1

Only ABA Approved Bachelor’s Degree in Northern California

Overview

There is a growing need for paralegals and legal professionals to fill the technology gap in the legal world. Students and legal professionals who complete this concentration will immediately contribute to employers with regard to legal technology use. Among other responsibilities, they will be able to suggest appropriate software for billing, word processing, discovery document processing, e-discovery case management, document organization, and case management, as well as use various software programs to make common tasks in a legal environment more efficient and cost effective.

Highlights

  • Concentration may be embedded into the BA Legal Studies or the Paralegal Certificate program without requiring any additional units
  • Non-degree-seeking students may enroll through JFKU Continuing Education
  • Most courses taken online

Big things start with a simple yes.

Concentration Curriculum

REQUIREMENTS

This 12-unit concentration may be completely embedded in the Legal Studies Paralegal Certificate program. 4 of the 12 units are already required for the certificate, and the remaining 8 units may be taken to satisfy the 8 units of legal specialty coursework also required for the certificate.

The following 4 courses are required to complete the concentration.

Courses
Units
PLS3010 Legal Technology Applications
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Winter and Summer quarters. This course provides training on software used for communication, creating legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Acrobat, and Outlook. Students will be exposed to legal-specific software in terms of billing, document management, case management, and trial presentation software used in our legal community. Specifically, students will perform hands-on training and exercises in: Clio, TimeMap, Relativity, Nuance, Workshare, Sanction, and TrialDirector.
PLS3046 Project Management in E-Discovery
2
This 2-unit course is offered completely online in the Winter quarter. Paralegals are often depended on to coordinate much of the discovery process in civil litigation. Taking on this role requires that paralegals are familiar with and understand e-discovery rules, requirements, and procedures. Students in this course will learn the basic principles of project management, and how to apply these established principles to each phase of the e-discovery process.
Courses
Units
PLS3047 Advanced Legal Technology
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Spring quarter. This course provides advanced training on software used for communication, and the creation and management of legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, FileSite, Workshare Compare, and NetDocuments. Students will learn how to use software commonly utilized in law firms and other legal environments for team collaboration with a focus on the capabilities of Office 365, including, but not limited to, Sway, OneNote and SharePoint. Students will also learn about the latest legal-related apps.
PLS3048 Trial Presentation Skills
2
This 2-unit hybrid course is offered in the Spring quarter. Students are required to attend four in-person sessions. In this hybrid course, students will gain live, hands-on experience with the legal trial presentation software TrialDirector. Specifically, students will learn the basic rules of evidence, and to prepare and display trial exhibits, and synchronize deposition videos. Students will also learn how to set-up the equipment needed for live trial presentation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the opportunity (optional) to gain experience with live trial presentation by operating TrialDirector in the summer mock trials for the law school.
Courses
Units
PLS3047 Advanced Legal Technology
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Spring quarter. This course provides advanced training on software used for communication, and the creation and management of legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, FileSite, Workshare Compare, and NetDocuments. Students will learn how to use software commonly utilized in law firms and other legal environments for team collaboration with a focus on the capabilities of Office 365, including, but not limited to, Sway, OneNote and SharePoint. Students will also learn about the latest legal-related apps.
PLS3048 Trial Presentation Skills
2
This 2-unit hybrid course is offered in the Spring quarter. Students are required to attend four in-person sessions. In this hybrid course, students will gain live, hands-on experience with the legal trial presentation software TrialDirector. Specifically, students will learn the basic rules of evidence, and to prepare and display trial exhibits, and synchronize deposition videos. Students will also learn how to set-up the equipment needed for live trial presentation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the opportunity (optional) to gain experience with live trial presentation by operating TrialDirector in the summer mock trials for the law school.

Change is possible. In fact, it’s already begun.

Sport Psychology

40+

AASP Certified/Approved Supervisors

9

Professional Development Seminars by Global Speakers/Year

4

Internships in Diverse Environments Completed by Students

Sport Psychology Programs

Dual MA Sport Psychology and PsyD

This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within six years of full time study.

MA Sport Psychology

Provides rigorous training to help students become effective sport psychology practitioners.

Grad Certificate in Sport Psychology

Provides psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and mental skills coaches the necessary coursework required by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) for certification as a consultant.

Faculty

You found the door. So open it.

Counseling Psychology

39,157

Counseling Hours Performed by Students Each Year

80%

Pass Rate for First Time Test Takers (MFT and LPCC)

1:1

Each Student Assigned a Faculty Advisor

Overview

Counseling psychology trains future licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Clinical Counselors to work with individuals, couples, and families in a variety of settings.

The programs emphasize development of the self as therapist; multicultural diversity and inclusion; social justice; and in-depth understanding of a wide range of individual and systemic counseling theories.

Counseling Psychology Programs

MA Counseling Psychology

Prepares students for future clinical work in county and community based agencies, residential and addiction treatment programs, inpatient and outpatient hospital settings, health care facilities, veterans’ centers, school districts, private and nonprofit outpatient clinics, and private practice settings.

MA Counseling Psychology - Holistic

With over 40 years of Holistic education, this family of programs incorporates a unique learning environment designed to support students in an integral model toward personal growth, human potential and service to others.

Academic Certificate in Trauma Studies

Developed to give practitioners both the foundational knowledge and practical skills necessary to work effectively and humanely with trauma sufferers. JFK University Certificate in Trauma Studies offers is available in both one and two-year formats.

Faculty

Big things begin with a simple yes.

Clinical Psychology

13:1

Student - Faculty Ratio in the PsyD Program

84%

of PsyD Students Complete the Program

7:1

Student - Faculty Ratio in the BA Psychology Program

18

Months to Complete BA Psychology

Overview

Clinical psychology is the largest branch of the field of psychology that integrates science, theory and clinical practice to assess and treat a broad spectrum of mental health and behavioral medicine concerns.

The demand for mental health professionals, particularly those with doctoral degrees, is expected to increase over the next decade.  

Clinical Psychology Programs

Doctor of Psychology

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology is designed for individuals seeking the highest level of training to become hands-on practitioners in the field of psychology.

Dual MA Sport Psychology and PsyD

This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within six years of full time study.

BA in Psychology

Engages students in a lively process of intellectual inquiry, self-discovery, critical thinking, creative synthesis, and interpersonal communication.

Faculty

Set something in motion with a simple yes.

Graduate Certificate
in Sport Psychology

40+

AASP-Certified/Approved Supervisors

1

Year - Approximate Time to Completion

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person
  • Hybrid
  • Online

Quick Facts

  • 1-Year Full-Time
  • Part-Time Option Available
  • 20 Units
  • Evening Option Available

Campus Location

Overview

JFK University’s Graduate Certificate in Sport Psychology is designed to provide psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and mental skills coaches the necessary coursework required by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) for certification as a consultant. This certificate also gives athletes, coaches, trainers, and others in the sport and fitness arenas an introduction to the world of sport psychology.

Highlights

  • Completed in approximately one year
  • Additional fieldwork opportunities
  • Available to fulfill AASP contact hour requirements
  • Online or in-person options

Curriculum

This 20-unit certificate can be completed online or on-site and will provide knowledge in areas of sport psychology and kinesiology. If a student is interested in completing fieldwork for an applied experience or to fulfill the 200 contact hour AASP requirements, 10 units of fieldwork and supervision (PSP 5280) can be added on to the certificate program.

Fall
Units
PSP 5800A Sport Psychology A
3
This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5815 Performance Enhancement A
3
Theory and practice of optimal performance are explored in the realm of sport behavior. Includes motivation theory, stress management, visualization, and mental rehearsal.
Winter
Units
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport OR
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP 5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP 5815.
Spring
Units
PSP 5800B Sport Psychology B OR
3
Prereq: PSP 5800A and preferably an Internship/applied sport psych experience This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5817 Performance Enhancement C
3
Prereq: PSP 5816 and preferably an internship/applied sport psych experience This advanced optimal-performance course emphasizes sport psychology skill development and addresses different styles of consulting. Students will be challenged by case studies and will role-play actual consulting scenarios in which they can develop and refine their own consulting style with feedback from their peers.
Summer
Units
PSP 5833 Kinesiology OR
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
Winter
Units
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport OR
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP 5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP 5815.
Summer
Units
PSP 5833 Kinesiology OR
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.

Faculty

Maybe lasts forever. Yes changes the world.

Master of Arts in Sport Psychology - Clinical PsyD Dual Degree

40+

AASP - Certified/Approved Supervisors

9

Professional Development Seminars Given by Global Speakers

92%

PsyD Completion Rate

13:1

PsyD Student to Faculty Ratio

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person
  • Hybrid

Quick Facts

  • 6 Years Full-Time
  • Part-Time Option Available
  • 222 Units
  • Evening Option Available

Overview

For individuals interested in both sport and clinical psychology. John F. Kennedy University offers an innovative program for those seeking to work in clinical settings as well as with athletes in a sport setting. Individuals work toward earning an MA in Sport Psychology and a PsyD degree concurrently. This program provides a unique training opportunity with clinical clients, athletes, as well as athletes with clinical concerns. And it prepares you to apply the skills and knowledge developed from the fields of sport and clinical psychology.

Read More

Highlights

  • Gain clinical competence in working with athletes
  • Innovative linked program allows for completion of both degrees within six-years full-time
  • Having both degrees enables graduates to use the title Sport Psychologist

Both the Master of Arts in Sport Psychology and the PsyD offer the highest level of available training in applied sport and clinical psychology respectively. (Unlike a research-based Ph.D., the PsyD program is designed to produce practitioners, not researchers, while providing the same high level of scholarly study.) And the missions of the two programs are similar: both provide a strong foundation in counseling skills and train students to serve multicultural and diverse populations.

In the past, students could earn a Master’s degree in two years and a Doctorate in Psychology in an additional four years. This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within five years of intensive, full-time study (part-time options are available). Students earn their Master of Arts in Sport Psychology after their third year and they earn their PsyD after their fifth year. With both degrees, graduates are able to use the title “Sport Psychologist” and apply to sit for the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) certification exam. Graduates also earn eligibility to take the psychology licensing exam for the state of California.

Requirements

PsyD core coursework: 128 units (including externship)

Electives: 16 units minimum: May be taken anytime after Spring Quarter of Year 2.

Total Units for years 2-5 must equal or exceed 144

Internship = 36 units

Total Sport Psychology units = 42
Total PsyD program units = 180
Total units for MA/PsyD = 222

Prerequisites

  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Theories of Personality
  • Diversity-related course
  • Statistics

Curriculum

Fall - First Year
Units
PSP 5800A Sport Psychology A
3
This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5819 Social & Historical Issues in Sport
2
The course examines selected topics within the sociology and history of sport. Particular emphasis will be given to issues related to the potential of sport to benefit society and its potential to reinforce existing social problems. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences within sport and to explore in detail one area of special interest within the history and sociology of sport. The course offers an analysis of sport as a social institution and the interrelations between sport and societal subsystems, as well as a consideration of the attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with sport. Analysis of contemporary problems associated with sport will be made, with ties made to their historic origins; such problems include race relations, the traditional and emergent role of women, aggression and violence, and political and economic concerns.
PSP 5815 Performance Enhancement A
3
Theory and practice of optimal performance are explored in the realm of sport behavior. Includes motivation theory, stress management, visualization, and mental rehearsal.
PSP 5803A Ethics and Professional Issues in Sport Psychology A
2
Examines ethical issues that impact the field of applied sport psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interaction with an experienced professional, students learn how ethical issues influence consultation and develop ways to deal with ethical dilemmas that may arise in sport psychology.
PSP 9020 Town Hall Meeting
0
PSP 5002 Writing Workshop
0
No Fee
Winter - First Year
Units
PSP 5811 Counseling Skills A
3
Introduction to basic counseling skills and techniques relevant to sport psychology consulting in a safe and supervised environment. Included are tools for building rapport, empathy, listening and life-development skills, treatment versus consulting, ethics, closure, and termination. Students will also develop skills in presenting sport psychology intervention material.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP5815.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
Spring - First Year
Units
PSP 5822 Team Building
3
The course examines selected topics within the social psychology and sociology of sport. Particular emphasis will be given to issues related to group behavior and dynamics, leadership, interpersonal communication, the potential of sport to benefit society, and its potential to reinforce existent social problems. The course offers and analysis of sport as a social institution and the interrelations between sport and societal subsystems, as well as a consideration of the attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with sport. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences within sport. Analysis of contemporary problems associated with sport will be made; such problems include race relations, the traditional and emergent role of women, aggression and violence, and political and economic concerns. Additionally, students will learn team building and communication skills and strategies that will enable them to effectively work within the current framework of sport in society. The course will examine the practical and theoretical application of group process and social psychology in relation to working in the field of sport psychology. The students will gain an understanding of group behavior and dynamics and will be able to use this knowledge with diverse populations. Students will learn to recognize ethical issues in relation to working with groups and will examine their interpersonal and professional style.
PSP 5804 Assessment Strategies
3
Examines a variety of assessment methods used to gain information from athletes, coaches, or teams utilizing sport psychology professionals. Topics to be covered include the role of assessment in the initial stages of work with athletes, methods of informal assessment, sport-specific assessment tools, issues of reliability and validity with instruments, and the ethical use of measures in the practice of sport psychology. Online or in residence.
PSP 9085 Fieldwork Exam
Prereqs: PSP 5803A, PSP 5815 and PSP 5816

$75 Fee
PSP 9090 Comprehensive. Written Examination
0
Prereqs:PSP 5800A, PSP 5803A, PSP 5804, PSP 5811, PSP 5822, PSP 5815, and PSP 5816

$75 Fee

Comprehensive written examination covering material of Phase I, to be taken at the end of Phase I. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office
PSP 5279 Fieldwork Orientation
$75 Fee
PSP 9020 Town Hall Meeting
0
Summer - First Year
Units
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience: Fieldwork I
3
Covers field placement and individual and group supervision. The field-placement aspect requires students to intern at a site working with athletes and applying skills learned in the classroom. Individual and group supervision involves one-on-one meetings, discussions, case presentations, and role-playing and covers ethical issues. Provides students with a supportive environment for discussion and for exploring issues which pertain to their fieldwork experience. This course may be retaken for additional credit.
PSP 5834 Motor Learning and Performance
1
This course will teach students how to apply the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of real-world situations. Students will learn to identify solutions that address many of the issues and obstacles encountered when teaching and learning motor skills.
Fall - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self-reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression.

Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7007 Clinical Interviewing Skills I
3
This course is the first of a two course sequence. It is designed to teach students fundamental clinical interviewing skills. Students will learn the basic attending skills required to establish and maintain a therapeutic relationship, including empathy, listening, reflecting, focusing and formulating questions. Students will also practice skills related to informed consent, confidentiality, and cultural sensitivity. The importance of taking into consideration contextual variables such as culture and ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, migration, political conditions during the interview process is emphasized.
PSD 7xxx Psychopathology I & Lab
3
PSD 7225 Human Development
4
This course introduces students to empirically-based developmental psychology theories with an emphasis on conceptual issues and scientific methods in the study of developmental psychology. It teaches students to comprehend, assess, and evaluate scientific research on child development, and provides an essential understanding of child development for clinical activities. Students are taught to examine the interrelationship between physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development in infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence.
PSP 9000 Professional Development Seminar
0
Offered every quarter
Winter - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7008 Clinical Interviewing Skills II
3
This course is the second in a two course sequence. It builds upon the foundational clinical interviewing skills acquired in PSD 7007. Students will utilize these skills in establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship. Students will acquire additional skills such as confrontation and summarizing. In addition, specific situations such as suicide assessment, interviewing couples and younger clients will be addressed. The course will also explore clinical skills such as case formulation and report writing, peer supervision, the mental status examination, assessment of the client’s presenting problems, issues with difficult clients, and making appropriate referrals. Prerequisite: PSD 7007.
PSD 7xxxx Psychopathology II & Lab
3
PSD 7xxx Critical Analysis of Clinical Research: A Problem-Based Learning Lab
2
Spring - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7123 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course introduces the basic tenets of CBT and the various forms of this perspective. Discussions of the philosophy of CBT and the structure of a CBT case conceptualization set the stage for more detailed work with the kinds of disorders for which CBT has demonstrated effectiveness. The interventions and evaluation procedures commonly used by CBT practitioners are demonstrated and discussed with regard to their applicability to various forms of psychological, emotional, or social problems. Consideration of the applications and limitations of CBT to diverse populations are woven into the fabric of each discussion.
PSD 7141 Ethical and Legal Issues in Professional Psychology
3
This course focuses upon the legal and ethical issues related to the practice of psychology. Students explore issues which include, but are not limited to, licensing, scope of practice, competence, informed consent, client welfare, confidentiality (and its exceptions), and professional conduct. Also covered are issues related to the treatment of minors, couples, groups, and the use of technology in clinical psychology, as well as issues related to working with individuals with cultural, contextual, and individual differences from those of the provider. In addition, students will be introduced to methods of critically evaluating their professional behavior. The course emphasizes contemporary professional ethics and statutory, regulatory, and decisional laws that delineate the profession’s scope of practice and role of the psychologist.
PSD 7151 Quantitative Methods
3
This course is the first of a three course sequence. This course presents an overview of psychometrics and quantitative research design and methodology. In addition, the course covers ethics in research, issues of cultural diversity relevant to the process of research, and an introduction to data analysis using SPSS. The focus of the course is on acquisition of skills that permit students to critically evaluate published professional literature.
PsyD COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM I
June
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSD 7114 Psychometrics: The Basics of Assessment
2
This course is designed to provide first-year students with an overview of psychometric principles and introduce them to the various types of psychological assessment tools such as cognitive and intellectual testing and measurement of personality. The course covers the foundations of psychological assessment, tools used in psychological measurement (e.g., test construction) essential characteristics of psychological measurement (e.g., reliability and validity), and the application of measurement ( e.g., tests of intelligence, personality assessment). This course is a prerequisite for the Assessment Series courses (PSD 7115, 7116, and 7117).
PSD 7131 Psychology and Treatment of Substance Abuse
3
This course focuses on the identification, assessment, and treatment of individuals who are abusing substances. The influence of socio-economic status, cultural context, and the variations in substance use and abuse across groups will be considered. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PSD 7124 Family Systems Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course offers the basics in family systems theory and the historical context from which it arose. Students learn the application of systems theory to the treatment of a variety of family systems. A comparison and critique of systems theory from a postmodern perspective is included. The limitations of systems theory to families of diverse backgrounds are considered, and modifications of systems models that better meet such families’ needs are proposed.
PSD 7xxx Group Clinical Skills
2
Winter - First Year
Units
PSP 5811 Counseling Skills A
3
Introduction to basic counseling skills and techniques relevant to sport psychology consulting in a safe and supervised environment. Included are tools for building rapport, empathy, listening and life-development skills, treatment versus consulting, ethics, closure, and termination. Students will also develop skills in presenting sport psychology intervention material.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP5815.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
Summer - First Year
Units
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience: Fieldwork I
3
Covers field placement and individual and group supervision. The field-placement aspect requires students to intern at a site working with athletes and applying skills learned in the classroom. Individual and group supervision involves one-on-one meetings, discussions, case presentations, and role-playing and covers ethical issues. Provides students with a supportive environment for discussion and for exploring issues which pertain to their fieldwork experience. This course may be retaken for additional credit.
PSP 5834 Motor Learning and Performance
1
This course will teach students how to apply the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of real-world situations. Students will learn to identify solutions that address many of the issues and obstacles encountered when teaching and learning motor skills.
Winter - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7008 Clinical Interviewing Skills II
3
This course is the second in a two course sequence. It builds upon the foundational clinical interviewing skills acquired in PSD 7007. Students will utilize these skills in establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship. Students will acquire additional skills such as confrontation and summarizing. In addition, specific situations such as suicide assessment, interviewing couples and younger clients will be addressed. The course will also explore clinical skills such as case formulation and report writing, peer supervision, the mental status examination, assessment of the client’s presenting problems, issues with difficult clients, and making appropriate referrals. Prerequisite: PSD 7007.
PSD 7xxxx Psychopathology II & Lab
3
PSD 7xxx Critical Analysis of Clinical Research: A Problem-Based Learning Lab
2
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSD 7114 Psychometrics: The Basics of Assessment
2
This course is designed to provide first-year students with an overview of psychometric principles and introduce them to the various types of psychological assessment tools such as cognitive and intellectual testing and measurement of personality. The course covers the foundations of psychological assessment, tools used in psychological measurement (e.g., test construction) essential characteristics of psychological measurement (e.g., reliability and validity), and the application of measurement ( e.g., tests of intelligence, personality assessment). This course is a prerequisite for the Assessment Series courses (PSD 7115, 7116, and 7117).
PSD 7131 Psychology and Treatment of Substance Abuse
3
This course focuses on the identification, assessment, and treatment of individuals who are abusing substances. The influence of socio-economic status, cultural context, and the variations in substance use and abuse across groups will be considered. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PSD 7124 Family Systems Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course offers the basics in family systems theory and the historical context from which it arose. Students learn the application of systems theory to the treatment of a variety of family systems. A comparison and critique of systems theory from a postmodern perspective is included. The limitations of systems theory to families of diverse backgrounds are considered, and modifications of systems models that better meet such families’ needs are proposed.
PSD 7xxx Group Clinical Skills
2
Fall - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Applied Diagnosis
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7115 Assessment I & Lab
4
This is the first of a three course sequence. This course is designed to provide the student with a broad understanding of the intellectual/ cognitive assessment of adults, adolescents, and children. Teaching will include administration, scoring, and interpretation of some of the widely used cognitive, achievement, and neuropsychological screening measures: the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV), the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-V), the Wide Range Achievement Test 4 (WRAT 4), and the Bender II. Students will also learn about alternative cognitive measures including the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence 3 (TONI 3) and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-IV (PPVT-IV) . Students will also be taught how to conduct a thorough mental status exam with clients. The historical, cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic contexts of assessment and evaluation will be emphasized. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7114.
PSD 7122 Psychodynamic Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course reviews drive theory and ego psychology, object-relations theory, self-psychology, and intersubjective approaches to therapy. The paradigm shift in psychoanalytic thought from a drive theory to a relational theory model and the implications of this shift for clinical practice are examined. A critical review of psychodynamic theory and practice from a cultural perspective is included.
PSD 7250 Statistics
3
This is the second course in a three course sequence. It is designed to provide students with knowledge of inferential statistics through two-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis with an introduction to selected multivariate techniques. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding and appropriate use of statistics including knowledge of assumptions and limitations of specific techniques. Critical review of published empirical literature and critique of culturally appropriate analysis and interpretation is an integral part of the course. Students are introduced to the dissertation process and are guided to begin formulating a dissertation research question. Prerequisite: PSD 7151.
Winter - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Case Formulation
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7116 Assessment II & Lab
4
This is the second of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with a focused understanding of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Millon clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and their adolescent counterparts. Students will learn about the psychometric properties of the measures as well as learn to administer, score, and interpret them. Other personality measures such as the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory will be introduced. Additionally, the field of therapeutic assessment will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data while incorporating historical and socio-cultural contextual information, and providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7115.
PSD 7107 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
This course offers a practical, clinical, and evidence-based description of the functional anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system. Normal and abnormal development and functioning of the nervous system is presented, including concepts of neuronal physiology and maturation, sleep, arousal and attention, acquiring and retaining information, and various aspects of a person’s ability to act on and adapt to changing environments. Application of this information to clinical practice, research, and personal experience is encouraged. Gender, age, and racial/ethnic differences in physiological processes, as they relate to behavior and experience, are presented in light of new neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological research findings. The ways in which psychological symptoms can arise from physical problems will be discussed to facilitate accurate and comprehensive clinical diagnosis.
PSD 7251 Qualitative Research
2
This is the third course in a three course sequence. It introduces students to specific qualitative methodologies in detail: phenomenology, grounded theory, and qualitative content analysis. Additional forms of qualitative research are also introduced, including consensual qualitative research, qualitative meta-analysis, and case-study designs. The philosophical and methodological issues which underlie qualitative research will be discussed. The course includes lecture, discussion, and practice assignments covering interviewing and qualitative data analysis. Prerequisite: PSD 7250.
Spring - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Informed Treatment Planning
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7117 Assessment III & Lab
4
This is the third of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge and experience in the area of projective personality assessment. Students will learn to administer, code, score, and interpret the Rorschach using the Rorschach Performance Assessment System. Students will also learn to utilize other projective assessment techniques and the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank. Current research in the field of projective assessment will be presented. Multicultural considerations will be integrated throughout the course, and the historical and sociocultural contexts of evaluation will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data, providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of cognitive, personality, and projective assessment findings within the context of history, mental status, behavioral observations, SES and culture. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7116.
PSD 7160 Psychopharmacology
3
This course prepares students to evaluate and direct clients regarding psychiatric medications. Pharmacokinetics, the major classes of psychiatric medications, referral processes, and how to follow-up with clients on medications will be discussed. Students will gain an understanding of the practical, ethical, diversity-related, and philosophical advantages and limitations of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of clients with various psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSD 7016, PSD 7107.
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal I
1
This is the first of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will create a prospectus for their proposed studies, begin the process of recruiting a dissertation committee, as well as outline and begin drafting a Review of the Literature relevant to their proposed research. Prerequisite: PSD 7251.
Summer - Third Year
Units
PSD 7104 Social & Cultural Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of Social Psychology and other domains of psychological research addressing the nature and influence of culture, with an emphasis on social psychology research and theory relevant to multiculturalism, social justice and professional ethics. The course will also address some key pieces of organizational psychology research which could also be classified as social psychology.
PSD 7108 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of classical and recent research in the areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, as well as theories of emotion. While the emphasis of the course is on the science of psychology, the relevance of these models to diversity-competent clinical practice is also reviewed.
PSD 7xxx Psychology of Trauma
3
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal II
2
This is the second of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will continue to expand and refine their Literature Reviews, while drafting the Methods chapter of their dissertation proposals. Students also finalize their dissertation committees this quarter. Prerequisite: PSD 7252.
COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM II
(Sep)
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience
3
Note: This can be done any quarter once it has been confirmed that the student has the pre-reqs to start PSP internship work*
Fall - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Integrative Case Conceptualization and Treatment Planning
1
PSD 7003 History & Systems
3
This course discusses the evolution of modern psychology with regard to theories, systems and practices. It is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology, examining the philosophical, epistemological, cultural, and sociopolitical contexts and consequences of the major systems in the development of contemporary psychology.
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal III
2
This is the third of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will complete drafts of their dissertation proposal and Human Participants Review materials, and conduct a mock defense of their dissertation proposals. Prerequisite: PSD 7253.
PSP 5817 Performance Enhancement C
3
This advanced optimal-performance course emphasizes sport psychology skill development and addresses different styles of consulting. Students will be challenged by case studies and will role-play actual consulting scenarios in which they can develop and refine their own consulting style with feedback from their peers.
Winter - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Clinical Communication
1
PSD 7309.x Clinical Topics in Sport Psychology
3
EXPECTED - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
Spring - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Professional Development and Lifelong Learning
1
PSD 7xxx Internship Application Workshop
0
PSP 5800B Sport Psychology B
3
Take after 2nd PSP internship - This is an advanced course that is the second in a two-part series. The main theoretical approaches in the field of sport psychology will be revisited and addressed from an integrated perspective. The students will be expected to synthesize the various theoretical perspectives and research findings and show how this integrated perspective can help their work with performers. The course will continue to engage students to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to their work in the field as a practitioner.
CLINICAL PROFICIENCY EXAM
April
Summer - Fourth Year
Units
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
FINAL DEADLINE - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
PSP 9091 Comprehensive Oral Examination
0
(When all MA requirements are completed) $75 Fee Comprehensive oral examination covering material in all phases of the program to be taken in the student’s last quarter. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office.
PSP 9100 Exit Meeting
0
Winter - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Case Formulation
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7116 Assessment II & Lab
4
This is the second of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with a focused understanding of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Millon clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and their adolescent counterparts. Students will learn about the psychometric properties of the measures as well as learn to administer, score, and interpret them. Other personality measures such as the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory will be introduced. Additionally, the field of therapeutic assessment will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data while incorporating historical and socio-cultural contextual information, and providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7115.
PSD 7107 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
This course offers a practical, clinical, and evidence-based description of the functional anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system. Normal and abnormal development and functioning of the nervous system is presented, including concepts of neuronal physiology and maturation, sleep, arousal and attention, acquiring and retaining information, and various aspects of a person’s ability to act on and adapt to changing environments. Application of this information to clinical practice, research, and personal experience is encouraged. Gender, age, and racial/ethnic differences in physiological processes, as they relate to behavior and experience, are presented in light of new neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological research findings. The ways in which psychological symptoms can arise from physical problems will be discussed to facilitate accurate and comprehensive clinical diagnosis.
PSD 7251 Qualitative Research
2
This is the third course in a three course sequence. It introduces students to specific qualitative methodologies in detail: phenomenology, grounded theory, and qualitative content analysis. Additional forms of qualitative research are also introduced, including consensual qualitative research, qualitative meta-analysis, and case-study designs. The philosophical and methodological issues which underlie qualitative research will be discussed. The course includes lecture, discussion, and practice assignments covering interviewing and qualitative data analysis. Prerequisite: PSD 7250.
Summer - Third Year
Units
PSD 7104 Social & Cultural Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of Social Psychology and other domains of psychological research addressing the nature and influence of culture, with an emphasis on social psychology research and theory relevant to multiculturalism, social justice and professional ethics. The course will also address some key pieces of organizational psychology research which could also be classified as social psychology.
PSD 7108 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of classical and recent research in the areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, as well as theories of emotion. While the emphasis of the course is on the science of psychology, the relevance of these models to diversity-competent clinical practice is also reviewed.
PSD 7xxx Psychology of Trauma
3
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal II
2
This is the second of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will continue to expand and refine their Literature Reviews, while drafting the Methods chapter of their dissertation proposals. Students also finalize their dissertation committees this quarter. Prerequisite: PSD 7252.
COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM II
(Sep)
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience
3
Note: This can be done any quarter once it has been confirmed that the student has the pre-reqs to start PSP internship work*
Winter - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Clinical Communication
1
PSD 7309.x Clinical Topics in Sport Psychology
3
EXPECTED - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
Summer - Fourth Year
Units
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
FINAL DEADLINE - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
PSP 9091 Comprehensive Oral Examination
0
(When all MA requirements are completed) $75 Fee Comprehensive oral examination covering material in all phases of the program to be taken in the student’s last quarter. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office.
PSP 9100 Exit Meeting
0
Fall - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
Applied Clinical Theory
3
PSD 7230 Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision
3
Aspects of the supervisory process are presented through the use of theoretical and case materials. Each student has the opportunity to participate as a supervisor in training and have his or her work critiqued. This course also includes information and skills related to supervising organizations, i.e., understanding and managing multiple levels of a system including one’s own private or group clinical practice. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSD 7235 or instructor permission.
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
Winter - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
PSD 7215 Foundations of Professional Consultation & Advocacy
3
This course introduces students to the consultative and educational processes and roles in the profession of psychology and their application in working with diverse populations. Students become familiar with the basic stages and processes of consultation and various ways in which professional psychologists provide consultation services. Students are also introduced to the issues and processes of teaching in the field of psychology—including but not limited to administrative duties, course development, and course management. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PETITION TO GRADUATE
(Feb)
INTERNSHIP INTERVIEW PROCESS
Spring - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
FINAL DEADLINE – FINAL DISSERTATION DEFENSE
Fall - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Winter - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Spring - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Commencement & Graduation
If dissertation defended & 36 units of internship completed
Summer - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
4.5*
*If you began internship with 4.5 units. Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Winter - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
PSD 7215 Foundations of Professional Consultation & Advocacy
3
This course introduces students to the consultative and educational processes and roles in the profession of psychology and their application in working with diverse populations. Students become familiar with the basic stages and processes of consultation and various ways in which professional psychologists provide consultation services. Students are also introduced to the issues and processes of teaching in the field of psychology—including but not limited to administrative duties, course development, and course management. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PETITION TO GRADUATE
(Feb)
INTERNSHIP INTERVIEW PROCESS
Fall - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Spring - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Commencement & Graduation
If dissertation defended & 36 units of internship completed

Maybe lasts forever. Yes changes the world.

Faculty

39,157

Counseling Psychology Hours Performed by Students Each Year

40+

Years of Holistic Counseling Programs and Community Service

80%

Pass Rate for First Time MFT & LPCC Test Takers

4

Unique Holistic Specializations

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person

Quick Facts

  • 3-Years Full Time
  • Part-Time Option Available
  • 91 Units
  • Evening Option Available

Campus Location

Overview

The Holistic Studies Specialization offers a hybrid of the program’s other specializations, allowing interested students to explore transpersonal, somatic, and arts-based psychotherapeutic practices.

The Master of Arts degree in Counseling Psychology – Holistic with a Specialization in Holistic Studies prepares students for careers as psychotherapists with a special emphasis on transpersonal, somatic and arts based practices. This program is offered at our San Jose campus only and meets the educational requirements of the California Marriage and Family Therapist license and with additional coursework the Professional Clinical Counselor license.

This degree specialization offers a strong foundation in basic counseling theory and practice, combining theoretical and experiential learning modalities and emphasizing personal growth and development. Students engage in self-reflection throughout the program. Core coursework allows students the opportunity to develop awareness of their own process while developing counseling, interpersonal, and communication skills. Students also explore the integration of body, mind, emotions, and spirit in their work through content in body-oriented psychotherapies, transpersonal counseling, Jungian psychology, and humanistic psychology.

Read More

Highlights

  • Available at San Jose campus only
  • Emphasis in Buddhist Psychology
  • Emphasis in Queer Consciousness
  • Emphasis in Equine and Animal Assisted Psychotherapy

The coursework in transpersonal psychology deepens students’ knowledge of the role of meditation, dreams, archetypes, myth, and ritual in fostering psychological and spiritual well-being. They discover how transpersonal psychology emphasizes the quality of presence and authenticity of the therapist, an openness to expanded states of consciousness, and a trust in the client’s innate health and inner guiding wisdom as part of the therapeutic process and a deep exposure to how the arts are used to enhance psychotherapy.

Somatic psychology courses investigate the ways emotions, attitudes, and beliefs are often embedded in one’s physical structure, posture, expression, or voice. Movement seminars explore the reciprocal relationship between movement and the psyche. Students learn to utilize movement and body meditation techniques, work through emotional and energetic blocks, and cultivate body-mind-spirit integration. Students are encouraged to pursue both spiritual practices and somatic disciplines as a foundation for their work with others.

In addition the program provides focused emphasis in Buddhist Psychology, Queer Consciousness and Equine and Animal assisted Psychotherapy.

Listen closely. Are you getting a yes?

Curriculum

Year 1 - Fall
Units
HSJ 5000 Introduction to Holistic Studies
0
This course will introduce students to Holistic Studies and detail program requirements and student responsibilities. All students entering the Holistic Studies program are required to take this no-cost, no-credit course during their first quarter.
HSJ 5101 Group Process A
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
HSJ 5105 Therapeutic Communication A
3
An introduction to some basic principles and practices of effective communication. Students explore the use of communication in day-to-day life, relationships, counseling, teaching, employment settings, and other forms of working with people. Topics include presence, centering, listening skills, and discriminating between content and process.
HSJ 5010 Paradigms of Consciousness
3
An introduction to the philosophical concepts of holism. By exploring consciousness, the nature and structure of paradigms and paradigm shifts in psychological thinking, students will gain the theoretical foundation necessary to integrate transpersonal and somatic theories. Students will consider implications of living systems theory and the philosophy of holism as they relate to the field of counseling psychology.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5102 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
HSJ 5106 Therapeutic Communication B
3
This course will allow students to continue to practice skills and principles learned in the first quarter. The major defense mechanisms will be examined and strategies explored to deepen therapeutic process and classroom participation. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and making effective therapeutic interventions. Assessment of communication patterns in dysfunctional, functional, and optimal individual and couple, family, and educational systems are explored.
HSJ 5120 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle A
3
A review of the stages of individual development and the works of traditional theorists including Freud, Mahler, and Piaget as well as those of contemporary somatic theorists. Introduction to the concept of family life cycle.
Year 1 - Spring
Units
HSJ 5103 Group Process C
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
HSJ 5121 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle B
3
Focuses on family life cycle and the ways in which it is influenced by, and is independent of, the developmental experiences of family members in their families of origin. Major theories of healthy and dysfunctional family development are covered including the somatic theories, relating events in the family life cycle to each member’s health.
HSJ 5235 Ethics and the Law
3
Students become familiar with the existing legal and ethical issues facing therapists. Students will make an in-depth study of the power of dynamics in the therapeutic relationship. California laws for psychotherapists are studied.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5115 Fundamentals of Transpersonal Counseling
2
Covers basic postulates of transpersonal psychology. Surveys Jungian psychology, transpersonal approaches to psychotherapy, psychosynthesis, imagery/movement psychology, and myth, art, and ritual in counseling.
HSJ 5126 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling
3
Provides an overview of the field of cross-cultural issues related to counseling. Special emphasis is placed on fostering an understanding of cross-cultural dynamics in counseling through an examination of the historical, political, and sociocultural issues that impact the lives of ethnic minority clients.
HSJ 5205 Body-Oriented Psychotherapies
2
Students examine psychological attitudes and learn how these attitudes are embodied in a particular physical structure. The relationships between Freudian, Jungian, and somatic approaches such as Reichian therapy or bioenergetics are covered.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5102 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
HSJ 5106 Therapeutic Communication B
3
This course will allow students to continue to practice skills and principles learned in the first quarter. The major defense mechanisms will be examined and strategies explored to deepen therapeutic process and classroom participation. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and making effective therapeutic interventions. Assessment of communication patterns in dysfunctional, functional, and optimal individual and couple, family, and educational systems are explored.
HSJ 5120 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle A
3
A review of the stages of individual development and the works of traditional theorists including Freud, Mahler, and Piaget as well as those of contemporary somatic theorists. Introduction to the concept of family life cycle.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5115 Fundamentals of Transpersonal Counseling
2
Covers basic postulates of transpersonal psychology. Surveys Jungian psychology, transpersonal approaches to psychotherapy, psychosynthesis, imagery/movement psychology, and myth, art, and ritual in counseling.
HSJ 5126 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling
3
Provides an overview of the field of cross-cultural issues related to counseling. Special emphasis is placed on fostering an understanding of cross-cultural dynamics in counseling through an examination of the historical, political, and sociocultural issues that impact the lives of ethnic minority clients.
HSJ 5205 Body-Oriented Psychotherapies
2
Students examine psychological attitudes and learn how these attitudes are embodied in a particular physical structure. The relationships between Freudian, Jungian, and somatic approaches such as Reichian therapy or bioenergetics are covered.
Year 2 - Fall
Units
HSJ 5201 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy A
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HSJ 5215 Marriage & Family Counseling A
3
Introduction to the principles and methods of marriage and family counseling including family systems theories, methods for assessment of family interaction patterns, and intervention strategies appropriate to different types of family dysfunction. The relationship between family systems and principles of holism are discussed.
HSJ 5230 Sexuality
2
The sexual response cycle, male and female sexuality, and sexual development and dysfunction are discussed from physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and somatic perspectives. Explores therapeutic approaches as they apply to individuals, couples, and families.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5202 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy B
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HSJ 5216 Marriage & Family Counseling B
3
Application of principles and methods of marriage and family counseling and marriage and family systems theory to specific family problems such as terminal illness, psychosomatic disorders, and addictive behavior.
HSJ 5620 Approaches to Trauma
2
This course provides an overview of the history of the concept of trauma and trauma treatment and a basic understanding of the psychobiology and neurobiology of trauma and PTSD. Conceptual distinctions will be made between developmental wounding, developmental trauma, and shock trauma. Current diagnoses overly linked to trauma (PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder, Complex PTSD and Developmental Trauma Disorder) will be discussed. The topics covered include phase-oriented treatment, dissociation models, countertransference, and building somatic and relational resources. The discussion and training will include application of somatic trauma approaches to help stabilize situations involving personal trauma, disasters, and violence.
Year 2 - Spring
Units
HSJ 5210 Child Therapy
3
Examines the psychological issues of childhood from traditional and somatic perspectives. Reviews a variety of therapeutic methods for working with children and addresses the child’s expression of energy, physical motility, and health.
HSJ 5220 Jungian Psychology
3
Prerequisite: HSJ 5115 (3 units) Presents basic Jungian concepts, models of the psyche and processes. The contributions of Jung and Jungian-oriented therapists to the field of transpersonal and somatic psychology will be explored. Includes the nature of archetypes, myth, ritual, dreams, and how to work with clients using these resources as well as how these elements are present in our own lives and culture.
HSJ 5520 Psychopharmacology
3
This course offers an introduction and general overview of the field of psychopharmacology as it relates to the practice of psychotherapy. Current medications, research in psychopharmacology, and psychoneurology will be covered. In addition alternative medicine, natural remedies, and cultural issues from a holistic perspective will be covered as will the relationship between the psychotherapist and physician in medication management.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5130 Movement Seminar
3
Prerequisite: HSJ 5100 (3 units) A holistic approach to working with movement in educational and therapeutic settings. Students explore movement development and articulation, re-patterning, and expression and integration. At the end of the course, students will have an understanding of movement in relation to themselves as well as experience in exploring movement with others.
HSJ 5225 Basic Addiction Studies
3
Basic information about alcoholism and chemical dependency including definitions, impact upon the users and their environments, medical aspects, current theories of the etiology of substance abuse, major treatment approaches, and community resources. Topics are covered from a systems perspective and include spiritual and nutritional issues in chemical dependency.
HSJ 5243 Community Mental Health
3
This course prepares students for challenges and opportunities, taking a holistic approach to working in community mental health settings. Topics include: the history of institutionalization and the community mental health movement; navigating the complex public heatlh and social services systems; working with clients diagnosed with serious mental disorders; useful therapeutic models and effective practices; principles of recovery; strength-based assessment and resilience; fundamentals of case management; coordination of care and family and community involvement.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5202 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy B
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HSJ 5216 Marriage & Family Counseling B
3
Application of principles and methods of marriage and family counseling and marriage and family systems theory to specific family problems such as terminal illness, psychosomatic disorders, and addictive behavior.
HSJ 5620 Approaches to Trauma
2
This course provides an overview of the history of the concept of trauma and trauma treatment and a basic understanding of the psychobiology and neurobiology of trauma and PTSD. Conceptual distinctions will be made between developmental wounding, developmental trauma, and shock trauma. Current diagnoses overly linked to trauma (PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder, Complex PTSD and Developmental Trauma Disorder) will be discussed. The topics covered include phase-oriented treatment, dissociation models, countertransference, and building somatic and relational resources. The discussion and training will include application of somatic trauma approaches to help stabilize situations involving personal trauma, disasters, and violence.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5130 Movement Seminar
3
Prerequisite: HSJ 5100 (3 units) A holistic approach to working with movement in educational and therapeutic settings. Students explore movement development and articulation, re-patterning, and expression and integration. At the end of the course, students will have an understanding of movement in relation to themselves as well as experience in exploring movement with others.
HSJ 5225 Basic Addiction Studies
3
Basic information about alcoholism and chemical dependency including definitions, impact upon the users and their environments, medical aspects, current theories of the etiology of substance abuse, major treatment approaches, and community resources. Topics are covered from a systems perspective and include spiritual and nutritional issues in chemical dependency.
HSJ 5243 Community Mental Health
3
This course prepares students for challenges and opportunities, taking a holistic approach to working in community mental health settings. Topics include: the history of institutionalization and the community mental health movement; navigating the complex public heatlh and social services systems; working with clients diagnosed with serious mental disorders; useful therapeutic models and effective practices; principles of recovery; strength-based assessment and resilience; fundamentals of case management; coordination of care and family and community involvement.
Year 3 - Fall
Units
HSJ 5301 Supervised Field Practicum A
3
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5330 Clinical Skills: Partner & Spousal Abuse, Elder Care
2
This course looks at the whole family system and the impact of violence and abuse upon it. Trauma issues and their impact on each family member will be discussed, as well as the physiological effect of trauma on the brain. Topics include identification and treatment of abusers; victims and the children and teens living with them; attachment and physiological issues that keep couples together; identification, treatment, and reporting issues of elder and child abuse; cultural, religious, and GLBT issues and abuse; and countertransference issues. In addition, mental health issues in aging and long-term care will be addressed. Therapeutic strategies will be presented to enhance collaboration between families and care providers and maximize quality of life for the elder client.
HSJ 5530 Psychological Testing
3
This survey course is designed to help students understand the basic concepts and applications of psychological testing and the psychometric properties of psychological tests. This course will emphasize the appropriate applications and limitations of many of the current psychological tests—especially with regard to their use with people of non-dominant cultures. Issues of validity and ethics will be reviewed in this regard.
Year 3 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5302 Supervised Field Practicum B
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5350 Final Integrative Project A
1
This course examines the philosophical, personal, and professional issues raised in the course of graduate study in counseling psychology. Students develop an outline for an integrative paper that includes their understanding of holistic studies, transpersonal and somatic psychology, and their own personal growth work. This is the first in a two-course sequence.
HSJ 5315 Case Seminar: Individual
3
This course focuses on clinical case presentation for students in field placement. Case presentations from the student's current placement serve as a starting point for lecture, clinical discussion, exploration of diversity issues, role-play, and self-exploration within a transpersonal and somatic psychology perspective. This class supports students in acquiring professional competence in the important clinical skill of case presenting.
Year 3 - Spring
Units
HSJ 5303 Supervised Field Practicum C
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5313 Advanced Clinical Skills : Being the Psychotherapist
2
This course, designed for third-year students in field practicum, explores the professional use of clinical interventions from somatic, transpersonal, and holistic perspectives. Case material from the trainee’s current MFT placement will serve as the starting point for discussion, role-play, dyad work, and lecture. This course is taken concurrently with the student’s third quarter of field practicum.
HSJ 535X Final Integrative Project Ex
0.5
This is the second in a two-course sequence. Students complete their integrative paper and give an oral presentation on their topic. Students take this course when ready to complete their paper.
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5304 Supervised Field Practicum D
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5351 Final Integrative Project B
1.5
This is the second in a two-course sequence. Students complete their integrative paper and give an oral presentation on their topic. Students take this course when ready to complete their paper.
HSJ 5100 Holistic Seminar
1
This course gives students in-depth exposure to various modalities of somatic and transpersonal counseling and provides practice in the application of clinical and educational skills to the psychotherapy of individuals, groups and families. Seminars will be offered on a variety of modalities, including, but not limited to, Hakomi, Feldenkrais, and meditation. Students will take two courses during their first year of study. This course must be taken for a total of four units.
HSJ 5400 Field Practicum Checkout
0
Year 3 - Winter
Units
HSJ 5302 Supervised Field Practicum B
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5350 Final Integrative Project A
1
This course examines the philosophical, personal, and professional issues raised in the course of graduate study in counseling psychology. Students develop an outline for an integrative paper that includes their understanding of holistic studies, transpersonal and somatic psychology, and their own personal growth work. This is the first in a two-course sequence.
HSJ 5315 Case Seminar: Individual
3
This course focuses on clinical case presentation for students in field placement. Case presentations from the student's current placement serve as a starting point for lecture, clinical discussion, exploration of diversity issues, role-play, and self-exploration within a transpersonal and somatic psychology perspective. This class supports students in acquiring professional competence in the important clinical skill of case presenting.
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HSJ 5304 Supervised Field Practicum D
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HSJ 5351 Final Integrative Project B
1.5
This is the second in a two-course sequence. Students complete their integrative paper and give an oral presentation on their topic. Students take this course when ready to complete their paper.
HSJ 5100 Holistic Seminar
1
This course gives students in-depth exposure to various modalities of somatic and transpersonal counseling and provides practice in the application of clinical and educational skills to the psychotherapy of individuals, groups and families. Seminars will be offered on a variety of modalities, including, but not limited to, Hakomi, Feldenkrais, and meditation. Students will take two courses during their first year of study. This course must be taken for a total of four units.
HSJ 5400 Field Practicum Checkout
0

Faculty

Feeling good about this?

39,157

Counseling Psychology Hours Performed by Students Each Year

40+

Years of Holistic Counseling Programs and Community Service

80%

Pass Rate for First Time MFT & LPCC Test Takers

4

Unique Holistic Specializations

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person

Quick Facts

  • 3-Years Full Time
  • Part-Time Option Available
  • 91 Units
  • Evening Option Available

Overview

The somatic perspective includes the wisdom and methods of psychoanalytic, experiential, and humanistic orientations and expands them to create a more integrated holistic perspective that includes the body-mind-spirit connection. It trusts in the client’s innate health and bodily wisdom as gateways to healing.

The Somatic Psychology Specialization emphasizes the counselor’s presence, authenticity, and embodiment as central to the therapeutic process. It is one of the few university programs in the world to offer professional training in psychotherapeutic practice from a body-oriented—that is, a somatic—perspective.

Highlights

  • Offers a strong foundation in counseling theory and practice from an integrative, whole-person model
  • Curriculum emphasizes the embodiment of personal and cultural beliefs and attitudes
  • One of the few Somatic Psychology Master’s level degree programs in the world

Change is waiting to happen. You make the call.

Curriculum

Year 1 - Fall
Units
SPC 5323 Therapeutic Communication A
3
This course is an introduction to basic principles and practices of therapeutic communication. Students will study and practice basic psychotherapeutic concepts, skills, and self-awareness. Through lectures, films, and experiential practice, students will be helped to develop the clinical skills of somatic reflection, awareness, clear communication, flexibility, insight, compassion, cross-cultural sensitivity, and personal presence.
SPC 5220 Principles of Somatic Psychology
3
An introduction to the fundamentals of somatic psychology, the field, and its basic concepts and values. Areas of focus include history, issues, principles, and practices with attention to the origins and psycho-emotional consequences of the mind-body split. Students are introduced to basic practices such a sensory tracking, centering, grounding, self-forming, and the concepts of dynamic systems and self-regulation.
CNS 5010 Paradigms of Consciousness
3
A paradigm is a model of reality, or aspects of reality, held by a community, and affirmed and enacted through communal behavior. Society today is shaped by past paradigms of consciousness as well as those which are newly emerging. This class explores the nature of paradigms, how they emerge, and how they are sustained and changed. We give particular attention to the evolution of various paradigms of consciousness and reality – from indigenous to modern, postmodern, holistic, and integral – and examine the potential of each to contribute to personal, social, and global transformation. This course is offered in both classroom and online modalities.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
HPC 5000 Intro. to Holistic Studies Counseling Program
0
Year 1 - Winter
Units
SPC 5324 Therapeutic Communication B
3
his course introduces students to specific Somatic Psychology clinical processes and practices within a holistic and psycho-dynamic model. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and in developing effective therapeutic interventions is the focus. The emphasis is on understanding and working with nonverbal and verbal communication and somato-psychological defense patterns in individuals, couples, and family systems.
PC 5325 Ethics and the Law
3
Familiarizes students with the existing legal and ethical issues facing therapists including MFT licensing requirements and California laws for psychotherapists. Issues are explored through the examination of personal values and biases. Must be taken prior to field placement.
SPC 5535 Individual Development and the Family Life Cycle A
3
This course introduces students to classic developmental theorists from a dynamic living systems and somatic psychology perspective. The emphasis is placed on early bodily and sensory organization and on the primacy of relationship in development. A holistic theory of self and ego development is presented. This course will consider how Freud, Reich, Mahler, Winnicott, Piaget, Bowlby, Kohut, Stern, Schore, Fogel, and Greenspan help us understand the process by which we come to inhabit our embodied self across the lifespan.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 1 - Spring
Units
SPC 5536 Individual Development and the Family Life Cycle B
3
This course focuses on the phase-specific, holistic process of development from adolescence to the end of life. A biopsychosocial perspective is applied to the areas of cognitive, emotional, and relational development. Contemporary family life is explored through the in-class use of the family genogram and through discussion of multicultural family patterns and the “family body.” Sources include McGoldrick, Erickson, Kegan, Cook-Greuter, and Ram Dass.
HPC 5422 Cross Cultural Issues In Counseling
3
Provides an overview of the field of cross-cultural issues related to counseling. Special emphasis is placed on fostering an understanding of cross-cultural dynamics in counseling through an examination of the historical, political, and sociocultural issues that impact the lives of ethnic minority clients.
SPC 5004 Group Process A
2
Using traditional, holistic, and somatic group therapy techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of communication and behavior in a group context. Through class participation, students experience and learn group theory and group facilitation skills. This class must be taken in three consecutive quarters.
PC 5612 Supervised Practicum Touch in Psychotherapy
1
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
SPC 5512 Somatic Psychology Perspectives on Stress and Psychobioimmunology
2
This course introduces students to the neurobiology of stress, stress profiling, and stress reduction techniques for clinical practice in everyday life. Psychobioimmunological theory and practice is also explored. Among the technical approaches which will be introduced are stress evaluation, autogenic training, progressive relaxation, guided meditation, visualizations, and somatically based techniques such as parasympathetic breathing, grounding, mindful movement, and conscious self-regulation through awareness.
HPC 5250 Basic Addictions
3
Basic information about alcoholism and chemical dependency including definitions, effects on substance users and their environments, medical aspects, etiology of substance abuse, major treatment approaches, and available community resources. The course is taught from a systems perspective and covers spiritual and nutritional issues in chemical dependency.
SPC 5005 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, holistic, and somatic group therapy techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of communication and behavior in a group context. Through class participation, students experience and learn group theory and group facilitation skills. This class must be taken in three consecutive quarters.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
SPC 5324 Therapeutic Communication B
3
his course introduces students to specific Somatic Psychology clinical processes and practices within a holistic and psycho-dynamic model. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and in developing effective therapeutic interventions is the focus. The emphasis is on understanding and working with nonverbal and verbal communication and somato-psychological defense patterns in individuals, couples, and family systems.
PC 5325 Ethics and the Law
3
Familiarizes students with the existing legal and ethical issues facing therapists including MFT licensing requirements and California laws for psychotherapists. Issues are explored through the examination of personal values and biases. Must be taken prior to field placement.
SPC 5535 Individual Development and the Family Life Cycle A
3
This course introduces students to classic developmental theorists from a dynamic living systems and somatic psychology perspective. The emphasis is placed on early bodily and sensory organization and on the primacy of relationship in development. A holistic theory of self and ego development is presented. This course will consider how Freud, Reich, Mahler, Winnicott, Piaget, Bowlby, Kohut, Stern, Schore, Fogel, and Greenspan help us understand the process by which we come to inhabit our embodied self across the lifespan.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
SPC 5512 Somatic Psychology Perspectives on Stress and Psychobioimmunology
2
This course introduces students to the neurobiology of stress, stress profiling, and stress reduction techniques for clinical practice in everyday life. Psychobioimmunological theory and practice is also explored. Among the technical approaches which will be introduced are stress evaluation, autogenic training, progressive relaxation, guided meditation, visualizations, and somatically based techniques such as parasympathetic breathing, grounding, mindful movement, and conscious self-regulation through awareness.
HPC 5250 Basic Addictions
3
Basic information about alcoholism and chemical dependency including definitions, effects on substance users and their environments, medical aspects, etiology of substance abuse, major treatment approaches, and available community resources. The course is taught from a systems perspective and covers spiritual and nutritional issues in chemical dependency.
SPC 5005 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, holistic, and somatic group therapy techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of communication and behavior in a group context. Through class participation, students experience and learn group theory and group facilitation skills. This class must be taken in three consecutive quarters.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 2 - Fall
Units
SPC 5241 The Cultural Body: Society, Body Image and the Self
2
Examines the manner in which family, society, and culture act as intervening variables in our relationship to bodies. Beliefs (personal, familial, social, and cultural) and mythologies regarding the body and the impact of these beliefs on our somato-psychological experience will be examined. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and compulsive eating are examined as specific examples of cultural distortion of bodily self-awareness. In addition, the course will also look at cross-cultural differences in the manner and meaning of embodiment and the ramifications for clinical practice.
SPC 5430 Movement Seminar A: The Self in Movement
2
This course is an experiential and theoretical introduction to movement as a process of somatic inquiry, clinical exploration, and therapeutic intervention. Students will become familiar with a variety of both directive and free-movement approaches including psychodynamic traditions, developmental movement, authentic movement, body mind centering, and continuum movement.
HPC 5200 Diagnosis, Assessment and Therapeutic Strategy A
3
A review of traditional and transpersonal diagnostic systems including DSM-IV and alternative typologies(such as the Enneagram, a phenomenological approach, or a body-oriented approach), assessment methods including interviewing and projective and objective testing, and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories.
SPC 5006 Group Process C
2
Using traditional, holistic, and somatic group therapy techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of communication and behavior in a group context. Through class participation, students experience and learn group theory and group facilitation skills. This class must be taken in three consecutive quarters.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
SPC 5431 Movement Seminar B: Seminar in Clinical Technique
3
This course focuses on the learning and practice of movement-based psychotherapy interventions with diverse populations in a variety of therapeutic settings. Students explore the development of movement patterns, the process of re-patterning, and the use of movement for exploration, expression, and psycho-emotional integration in the psychotherapy process.
SPC 5205 Diagnosis, Assessment and Therapeutic Strategy B
3
Examination of specific diagnosis, assessment, and treatment skills and concepts from traditional and somatic psychology perspectives including character analysis, formative psychology, and other somato-psychological systems for evaluating and developing psychotherapeutic treatment strategies.
HPC 5550 Marriage and Family Counseling A
3
Introduction to the principles and methods of marriage and family counseling including family systems theories, methods for assessment of family interaction patterns, and intervention strategies appropriate to different types of family dysfunction. The relationship between family systems and principles of holism are discussed.
Year 2 - Spring
Units
HPC 5245 Psychopharmacology
3
An introduction and general overview of psychopharmacology as it relates to the practice of psychotherapy. Current medication, research in psychopharmacology, and psychoneurology will be covered. The course will also look at alternative remedies, natural medicine, and cultural issues from a holistic perspective as well as the relationship between psychotherapist and physician in medication management.
SPC 5552 Marriage and Family Counseling B
3
This course focuses on the application of principles and methods of experiential and somatic techniques, marriage and family counseling, and marriage and family systems theory to specific family problems—terminal illness, psychosomatic disorders, addictive behavior, relational conflict, divorce, blended families, and multiracial families.
SPC 5620 Holistic/Somatic Approaches to Trauma And PTSD A
2
An overview of the history of the concept of trauma and trauma treatment and a basic understanding of the psychobiology and neurobiology of trauma and PTSD. Conceptual distinctions will be made between developmental wounding, developmental trauma, and shock trauma. Current diagnoses overtly linked to trauma (PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder, Complex PTSD and Developmental Trauma Disorder) will be discussed. The topics covered include phase-oriented treatment, dissociation models, countertransference, and building somatic and relational resources. The discussion and training will include application of somatic trauma approaches to help stabilize situations involving personal trauma, disasters, and violence.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HPC 5158 Child Therapy
3
This course provides an overview of theories and “best practices” approaches in the treatment of children. Students will become familiar with therapeutic work in various treatment settings and develop an appreciation of the overarching importance of multicultural, social, and developmental contexts in understanding child behavior. Students will develop skills for working in collaborate relationships in child therapy and study psychodynamic and child centered approaches to child therapy.
HPC 5216 Sexuality
2
The sexual response cycle, male and female sexuality, and sexual development and dysfunction are discussed from physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and somatic perspectives. Explores therapeutic approaches as they apply to individuals, couples, and families.
SPC 5621 Somatic Approaches to Trauma And PTSD B
2
An exploration into the complexities of traumatic experience, and will explore the particulars of developmental trauma. Topics covered will include models of understanding and treating dissociation and fragmentation, the intersubjective field, vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue as well as working with positive states of experience. The application of somatic trauma approaches with disaster populations, violence, childhood trauma, and intergenerational trauma will be addressed. Advanced phase 1 and 2 skills of the trauma treatment model will be taught and phase 3 skills will be introduced. Students will learn to help clients process, metabolize and integrate personal historical experiences of trauma as well as ongoing challenges with activation. This course draws on the work of theorists such as Levine, Ogden, Rothchild, van der Kolk, and others.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum Trauma
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
SPC 5431 Movement Seminar B: Seminar in Clinical Technique
3
This course focuses on the learning and practice of movement-based psychotherapy interventions with diverse populations in a variety of therapeutic settings. Students explore the development of movement patterns, the process of re-patterning, and the use of movement for exploration, expression, and psycho-emotional integration in the psychotherapy process.
SPC 5205 Diagnosis, Assessment and Therapeutic Strategy B
3
Examination of specific diagnosis, assessment, and treatment skills and concepts from traditional and somatic psychology perspectives including character analysis, formative psychology, and other somato-psychological systems for evaluating and developing psychotherapeutic treatment strategies.
HPC 5550 Marriage and Family Counseling A
3
Introduction to the principles and methods of marriage and family counseling including family systems theories, methods for assessment of family interaction patterns, and intervention strategies appropriate to different types of family dysfunction. The relationship between family systems and principles of holism are discussed.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HPC 5158 Child Therapy
3
This course provides an overview of theories and “best practices” approaches in the treatment of children. Students will become familiar with therapeutic work in various treatment settings and develop an appreciation of the overarching importance of multicultural, social, and developmental contexts in understanding child behavior. Students will develop skills for working in collaborate relationships in child therapy and study psychodynamic and child centered approaches to child therapy.
HPC 5216 Sexuality
2
The sexual response cycle, male and female sexuality, and sexual development and dysfunction are discussed from physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and somatic perspectives. Explores therapeutic approaches as they apply to individuals, couples, and families.
SPC 5621 Somatic Approaches to Trauma And PTSD B
2
An exploration into the complexities of traumatic experience, and will explore the particulars of developmental trauma. Topics covered will include models of understanding and treating dissociation and fragmentation, the intersubjective field, vicarious traumatization and compassion fatigue as well as working with positive states of experience. The application of somatic trauma approaches with disaster populations, violence, childhood trauma, and intergenerational trauma will be addressed. Advanced phase 1 and 2 skills of the trauma treatment model will be taught and phase 3 skills will be introduced. Students will learn to help clients process, metabolize and integrate personal historical experiences of trauma as well as ongoing challenges with activation. This course draws on the work of theorists such as Levine, Ogden, Rothchild, van der Kolk, and others.
SPC 5612 Supervised Practicum Trauma
var*
Through a variety of different practica, students explore somatic practices that can be used with individuals, couples and families. These practica provide students with the opportunity to practice and experience the application of somatic psychology clinical skills.
Year 3 - Fall
Units
HPC 5751 Field Placement A
3
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
HPC 5243 Community Mental Health and Principles of Recovery
3
Preparation for challenges and opportunities, taking a holistic approach to working in community mental health settings. Topics include: the history of institutionalization and the community mental health movement; navigating the complex public health and social services systems; working with clients diagnosed with serious mental disorders; useful therapeutic models and effective practices; principles of recovery; strength-based assessment and resilience; fundamentals of case management; coordination of care and family and community involvement.
Year 3 - Winter
Units
HPC 5752 Field Placement B
2
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
SPC 5350 Integrative Final Project A
1
HPC 5703 Clinical Skills: Partner and Spousal Abuse, Elder Care
2
This course looks at the whole family system and the impact of violence and abuse upon it. Trauma issues and their impact on each family member will be discussed, as well as the physiological effect of trauma on the brain. Topics include identification and treatment of abusers; victims and the children and teens living with them; attachment and physiological issues that keep couples together; identification, treatment, and reporting issues of elder and child abuse; cultural, religious, and GLBT issues and abuse; and countertransference issues. In addition, mental health issues in aging and long-term care will be addressed. Therapeutic strategies will be presented to enhance collaboration between families and care providers and maximize quality of life for the elder client.
Year 3 - Spring
Units
HPC 5753 Field Placement C
2
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
SPC 5705 Counseling Case Seminar
3
This course focuses on clinical case presentation for students in field placement. Case presentations from the student’s current placement serve as a starting point for lecture, clinical discussion, exploration of diversity issues, role-play, and self-exploration within a somatic psychology perspective. This class supports students in acquiring professional competence in the important clinical skill of case presenting.
HPC 5530 Psychological Testing
3
This survey course is designed to help students understand the basic concepts and applications of psychological testing and the psychometric properties of psychological tests. The course will emphasize the appropriate applications and limitations of many of the current psychological tests—especially with regard to their use with people of non-dominant cultures. Issues of validity and ethics will be reviewed in this regard.
SPC 535X Integrative Final Project Extension
0.5
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HPC 5754 Field Placement D
2
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
SPC 5351 Integrative Final Project B
1.5
Year 3 - Winter
Units
HPC 5752 Field Placement B
2
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
SPC 5350 Integrative Final Project A
1
HPC 5703 Clinical Skills: Partner and Spousal Abuse, Elder Care
2
This course looks at the whole family system and the impact of violence and abuse upon it. Trauma issues and their impact on each family member will be discussed, as well as the physiological effect of trauma on the brain. Topics include identification and treatment of abusers; victims and the children and teens living with them; attachment and physiological issues that keep couples together; identification, treatment, and reporting issues of elder and child abuse; cultural, religious, and GLBT issues and abuse; and countertransference issues. In addition, mental health issues in aging and long-term care will be addressed. Therapeutic strategies will be presented to enhance collaboration between families and care providers and maximize quality of life for the elder client.
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HPC 5754 Field Placement D
2
In this four-quarter sequence, the focus is clinical fieldwork under supervision. Students train at community mental health sites, schools, hospitals, hospice centers, therapeutic nurseries, at one of the JFK University Community Counseling Centers, or other sites. Students gain firsthand knowledge and experience working with individuals, couples, and families. Supervision is provided by qualified, licensed therapists.
SPC 5351 Integrative Final Project B
1.5

Faculty

Big things begin with a simple yes.

39,157

Counseling Psychology Hours Performed by Students Each Year

40+

Years of Holistic Counseling Programs and Community Service

80%

Pass Rate for First Time MFT & LPCC Test Takers

4

Unique Holistic Specializations

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person

Quick Facts

  • 3-Years Full Time
  • Part-Time Option Available
  • 91 Units
  • Evening Option Available

Overview

The expressive arts include dance, visual art, music, drama, and poetry. Incorporating expressive arts into psychotherapy allows clients to draw upon the reciprocal relationship between body and mind. The Expressive Arts Specialization takes a Jungian approach, emphasizing the power of the image to bring insight and transformation.

Highlights

  • Multi-modal expressive arts approach to psychotherapy
  • Integration of dance, visual art, music, drama and poetry
  • Incorporates art-based interventions

Feeling good about this?

Curriculum

Year 1 - Fall
Units
HPB 5000 Intro to Holistic Studies
0
This course will introduce students to Holistic Studies and detail program requirements and student responsibilities. All students entering the Holistic Studies program are required to take this nocost, no-credit course during their first quarter.
HPB 5105 Therapeutic Communication A
3
An introduction to some basic principles and practices of effective communication. Students explore the use of communication in day-to-day life, relationships, counseling, teaching, employment settings, and other forms of working with people. Topics include presence, centering, listening skills, and discriminating between content and process.
HPB 5101 Group Process A
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
EXB 5200 Methods and Applications of Expressive Arts
3
The foundational class for the Expressive Arts specialization, this class provides an historic and theoretical overview and the therapeutic use of the creative process. Participation includes experiential exposure to a variety of visual, movement and other arts modalities and media.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HPB 5106 Therapeutic Communication B
3
This course will allow students to continue to practice skills and principles learned in the first quarter. The major defense mechanisms will be examined and strategies explored to deepen therapeutic process and classroom participation. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and making effective therapeutic interventions. Assessment of communication patterns in dysfunctional, functional, and optimal individual and couple, family, and educational systems are explored.
HPB 5102 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses: Creativity and Consciousness
2
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 1 - Spring
Units
HPB 5103 Group Process C
2
Students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
HPB 5225 Basic Addiction Studies
3
Basic information about alcoholism and chemical dependency including definitions, impact upon the users and their environments, medical aspects, current theories of the etiology of substance abuse, major treatment approaches, and community resources. Topics are covered from a systems perspective and include spiritual and nutritional issues in chemical dependency.
HPB 5120 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle A
3
A survey of the major stages of infancy, childhood and adolescence, emphasizing psychosexual, psychosocial, cognitive, and moral development, while examining the developmental tasks of each stage. The course will also explore spiritual, cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic factors that can influence progress through each stage. As always, family of origin and the student’s own family life will be explored as a learning tool.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
EXB 5250 Dance Therapy
3
HPB5121 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle B
3
Focuses on family life cycle and the ways in which it is influenced by, and is independent of, the developmental experiences of family members in their families of origin. Major theories of healthy and dysfunctional family development are covered including the somatic theories, relating events in the family life cycle to each member’s health.
HPB 5325 Law and Ethics
3
This course examines legal and ethical issues related to the practice of Marriage and Family Therapy and Professional Clinical Counseling. Class topics include ethical and legal obligations of licensees, legal trends in mental health and family law, professional behavior, and the impact of therapist’s values on practice. Case management, referral practices, confidentiality and privilege, scope of practice, client welfare, and AAMFT, CAMFT, and ACA specific codes of ethics are covered. Systemic, specific issues such as joint confidentiality, sessions with sub-systems, and separation and divorce, as well as basic family law are also considered.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HPB 5106 Therapeutic Communication B
3
This course will allow students to continue to practice skills and principles learned in the first quarter. The major defense mechanisms will be examined and strategies explored to deepen therapeutic process and classroom participation. Training in recognizing transference and countertransference issues and making effective therapeutic interventions. Assessment of communication patterns in dysfunctional, functional, and optimal individual and couple, family, and educational systems are explored.
HPB 5102 Group Process B
2
Using traditional, transpersonal, and somatic counseling techniques, students examine and work with their own and others’ feelings, motivations, and patterns of behavior. Through class participation, students learn group theory and group facilitation skills. Must be taken in three consecutive quarters during the first year of graduate study.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses: Creativity and Consciousness
2
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 1 - Summer
Units
EXB 5250 Dance Therapy
3
HPB5121 Individual Development & Family Life Cycle B
3
Focuses on family life cycle and the ways in which it is influenced by, and is independent of, the developmental experiences of family members in their families of origin. Major theories of healthy and dysfunctional family development are covered including the somatic theories, relating events in the family life cycle to each member’s health.
HPB 5325 Law and Ethics
3
This course examines legal and ethical issues related to the practice of Marriage and Family Therapy and Professional Clinical Counseling. Class topics include ethical and legal obligations of licensees, legal trends in mental health and family law, professional behavior, and the impact of therapist’s values on practice. Case management, referral practices, confidentiality and privilege, scope of practice, client welfare, and AAMFT, CAMFT, and ACA specific codes of ethics are covered. Systemic, specific issues such as joint confidentiality, sessions with sub-systems, and separation and divorce, as well as basic family law are also considered.
Year 2 - Fall
Units
HPB 5215 Marriage & Family Counseling A
3
Introduction to the principles and methods of marriage and family counseling including family systems theories, methods for assessment of family interaction patterns, and intervention strategies appropriate to different types of family dysfunction. The relationship between family systems and principles of holism are discussed.
HPB 5126 Cross-Cultural Issues in Counseling
3
Provides an overview of the field of cross-cultural issues related to counseling. Special emphasis is placed on fostering an understanding of cross-cultural dynamics in counseling through an examination of the historical, political, and sociocultural issues that impact the lives of ethnic minority clients.
HPB 5520 Psychopharmacology
3
This course offers an introduction and general overview of the field of psychopharmacology as it relates to the practice of psychotherapy. Current medications, research in psychopharmacology, and psychoneurology will be covered. In addition alternative medicine, natural remedies, and cultural issues from a holistic perspective will be covered as will the relationship between the psychotherapist and physician in medication management.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HPB 5216 Marriage & Family Counseling B
3
Application of principles and methods of marriage and family counseling and marriage and family systems theory to specific self-exploration. To be taken concurrent with the student’s second quarter of supervised field practicum.
EXB 5220 Jungian Psychology
3
Presents basic Jungian concepts, models of the psyche and processes. The contributions of Jung and Jungian-oriented therapists to the field of transpersonal and somatic psychology will be explored. Includes the nature of archetypes, myth, ritual, dreams, and how to work with clients using these resources as well as how these elements are present in our own lives and culture.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 2 - Spring
Units
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses: Art and Symbolic Process
2
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
PB 5201 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy A
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HPB 5620 Approaches to Trauma
2
This course provides an overview of the history of the concept of trauma and trauma treatment and a basic understanding of the psychobiology and neurobiology of trauma and PTSD. Conceptual distinctions will be made between developmental wounding, developmental trauma, and shock trauma. Current diagnoses overtly linked to trauma (PTSD, Acute Stress Disorder, Complex PTSD and Developmental Trauma Disorder) will be discussed. The topics covered include phase-oriented treatment, dissociation models, countertransference, and building somatic and relational resources. The discussion and training will include application of somatic trauma approaches to help stabilize situations involving personal trauma, disasters, and violence.
EXB 5210 Community Arts Practice A
1
Students participate and plan Master Class symposium to deepen skills of preparation of workshops and symposia. Organization, theme design, community performances/experiences and Master class instructors will be planned by students for the design and execution of the third year of their cohort flow.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HPB 5202 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy B
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HPB 5110 Child Therapy
3
Examines the psychological issues of childhood from traditional and somatic perspectives. Reviews a variety of therapeutic methods for working with children and addresses the child’s expression of energy, physical motility, and health.
HPB 5230 Human Sexuality
2
The sexual response cycle, male and female sexuality, and sexual development and dysfunction are discussed from physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and somatic perspectives. Explores therapeutic approaches as they apply to individuals, couples, and families.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HPB 5216 Marriage & Family Counseling B
3
Application of principles and methods of marriage and family counseling and marriage and family systems theory to specific self-exploration. To be taken concurrent with the student’s second quarter of supervised field practicum.
EXB 5220 Jungian Psychology
3
Presents basic Jungian concepts, models of the psyche and processes. The contributions of Jung and Jungian-oriented therapists to the field of transpersonal and somatic psychology will be explored. Includes the nature of archetypes, myth, ritual, dreams, and how to work with clients using these resources as well as how these elements are present in our own lives and culture.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 2 - Summer
Units
HPB 5202 Diagnosis, Assessment & Therapeutic Strategy B
3
An examination of traditional and somatic diagnostic systems including the DSM-IV-TR and somatic typologies. Assessment methods and therapeutic strategies appropriate to different diagnostic categories are covered.
HPB 5110 Child Therapy
3
Examines the psychological issues of childhood from traditional and somatic perspectives. Reviews a variety of therapeutic methods for working with children and addresses the child’s expression of energy, physical motility, and health.
HPB 5230 Human Sexuality
2
The sexual response cycle, male and female sexuality, and sexual development and dysfunction are discussed from physiological, psychological, sociocultural, and somatic perspectives. Explores therapeutic approaches as they apply to individuals, couples, and families.
Year 3 - Fall
Units
HPB 5301 Supervised Field Practicum A
3
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HPB 5330 Clinical Skills: Partner & Spousal Abuse, Elder Care
2
This course looks at the whole family system and the impact of violence and abuse upon it. Trauma issues and their impact on each family member will be discussed, as well as the physiological effect of trauma on the brain. Topics include identification and treatment of abusers; victims and the children and teens living with them; attachment and physiological issues that keep couples together; identification, treatment, and reporting issues of elder and child abuse; cultural, religious, and GLBT issues and abuse; and countertransference issues. In addition, mental health issues in aging and long-term care will be addressed. Therapeutic strategies will be presented to enhance collaboration between families and care providers and maximize quality of life for the elder client.
HPB 5243 Community Mental Health
3
This course prepares students for challenges and opportunities, This course looks at the whole family system and the impact of violence and abuse upon it. Trauma issues and their impact on each family member will be discussed, as well as the physiological effect of trauma on the brain. Topics include identification and treatment of abusers; victims and the children and teens living with them; attachment and physiological issues that keep couples together; identification, treatment, and reporting issues of elder and child abuse; cultural, religious, and GLBT issues and abuse; and countertransference issues. In addition, mental health issues in aging and long-term care will be addressed. Therapeutic strategies will be presented to enhance collaboration between families and care providers and maximize quality of life for the elder client.
Year 3 - Winter
Units
EXB 5211 Community Arts Practice B
1
Management and organization of the third year symposium will be executed by the students in this final segment of community arts practice. Planning, troubleshooting, arts experience and performance as well as smooth flow of Master classes will be delivered and evaluated by student and instructors.
HPB 5302 Supervised Field Practicum B
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
EXB 5350 Final Integrative Project A
1
This course examines the philosophical, personal, and professional issues raised in the course of graduate study in counseling psychology. Students develop an outline for an integrative paper that includes their understanding of holistic studies, transpersonal and somatic psychology, and their own personal growth work. This is the first in a two-course sequence.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 3 - Spring
Units
HPB 5303 Supervised Field Practicum C
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HPB 535x Final Integrative Project extension
0.5
HPB 5531 Psych Testing
3
This survey course is designed to help students understand the basic concepts and applications of psychological testing and the psychometric properties of psychological tests. This course will emphasize the appropriate applications and limitations of many of the current psychological tests—especially with regard to their use with people of non-dominant cultures. Issues of validity and ethics will be reviewed in this regard.
HPB 5315 Case Seminar: Individuals
3
Clinical case supervision for students in supervised field practicum. Case presentations from the student’s current placement serve as a starting point for lecture, discussion, role-play, and self-exploration. To be taken concurrent with the student’s second quarter of supervised field practicum.
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HPB 5304 Supervised Field Practicum D
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HPB 5351 Final Integrative Project B
1.5
This is the second in a two-course sequence. Students complete their integrative paper and give an oral presentation on their topic. Students take this course when ready to complete their paper.
HPB 5400 Field Practicum Checkout
0
EXB 5313 Advanced Clinical Skills: Arts in Psychotherapy
2
This course, designed for third-year students in field practicum, explores the professional use of clinical interventions from an expressive arts perspective. Case material from the trainee’s current MFT placement will serve as the starting point for discussion, role-play, dyad work, and lecture. This course is taken concurrently with the student’s third quarter of field practicum.
Year 3 - Winter
Units
EXB 5211 Community Arts Practice B
1
Management and organization of the third year symposium will be executed by the students in this final segment of community arts practice. Planning, troubleshooting, arts experience and performance as well as smooth flow of Master classes will be delivered and evaluated by student and instructors.
HPB 5302 Supervised Field Practicum B
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
EXB 5350 Final Integrative Project A
1
This course examines the philosophical, personal, and professional issues raised in the course of graduate study in counseling psychology. Students develop an outline for an integrative paper that includes their understanding of holistic studies, transpersonal and somatic psychology, and their own personal growth work. This is the first in a two-course sequence.
EXB 5100 EXA Master Courses
1
This course gives students in depth exposure to modalities and practices in Expressive Arts Therapies with field experts to deepen clinical and educational arts based psychotherapy with individuals, groups and families. Master classes will be offered in a variety of modalities as well as multimodal practices including but not limited to: dance, music, visual arts, drumming, poetry, performance based and sand tray therapies.
Year 3 - Summer
Units
HPB 5304 Supervised Field Practicum D
2
Supervised clinical experience in marriage and family therapy in approved settings. Students gain first-hand knowledge and experience working with clients and receive weekly supervision by qualified, licensed therapists. Supervised field practicum spans four academic quarters. Permission required to register.
HPB 5351 Final Integrative Project B
1.5
This is the second in a two-course sequence. Students complete their integrative paper and give an oral presentation on their topic. Students take this course when ready to complete their paper.
HPB 5400 Field Practicum Checkout
0
EXB 5313 Advanced Clinical Skills: Arts in Psychotherapy
2
This course, designed for third-year students in field practicum, explores the professional use of clinical interventions from an expressive arts perspective. Case material from the trainee’s current MFT placement will serve as the starting point for discussion, role-play, dyad work, and lecture. This course is taken concurrently with the student’s third quarter of field practicum.

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