Master of Arts
in Holistic Health Education
Holistic Nutrition

19.6%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in CA

14.5%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in U.S. 2014

Ways to Learn

  • Hybrid
  • Online

Quick Facts

  • 2-Years Full-Time
  • 3 Years Part-Time
  • 65 Units
  • Evening Option

Campus Location

Overview

The Specialization in Holistic Nutrition requires completion of 24 units, 13 of which are core units embedded in the MA in Holistic Health Education curriculum, and 11 of which are electives. (NOTE: Because we only require 5 units of electives, the specialization students end up taking a total of 65 rather than 59 units to get all 11 of the elective units required for the specialization.)

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Highlights

  • Unique nutritional expertise embedded within the field of health education
  • Emphasis on food as a healing modality
  • Students learn to customize their nutritional approach for each client

Students enrolled in the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition evaluate multiple nutritional approaches and dietary theories, analyzing the benefits and deficits of each approach as applied to the individual.

Throughout the course of study, students apply the theme of food as a healing modality in a range of ways, from addressing imbalances that occur throughout an individual’s lifetime to developing nutritional and herbal approaches to common disease states including heart disease, diabetes and dysglycemia, cancer, and autoimmune conditions. The concepts of nourishment and creating health within imbalance and disease states are also explored.

Finally, the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition reaches beyond holism as applied to the individual to implications in global food systems and environmental influences on individual and community health.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

As a result of completing the Specialization in Holistic Nutrition, graduates are able to:

  • Choose nutritional approaches and demonstrate understanding of theory, issues, health information, research, and applications in the field of nutrition
  • Explain in clear language basic philosophies of holistic nutrition and application of nutritional therapies
  • Practice professionally as a nutrition educator, instructor, and consultant as well as an integrative/holistic health educator
  • Embody a healthy approach to nutrition and nourishment, and model health through food and nutrition in one’s own community

Specialization Electives

The MA degree can be completed in 7 quarters if students start in the fall quarter. However, students pursuing the Holistic Nutrition Specialization and/or the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching will need at least one additional quarter to complete the required electives.

Electives
Units
HHE 5910 Dietary Planning
1
Students will develop the skills and practical experience necessary to develop customized diet and meal plans. Different approaches to diet development and meal planning will be covered. Students will learn how to develop meal plans and food charts for a variety of dietary approaches such as a cleansing diet, calorie controlled diets, vegetarian diets, vegan diets, Paleo, Ketogenic, etc. Diets for several common health issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5911 Nutritional Consultation Business Practices
1
This course is designed to train students how to build, run, and market their own nutrition consulting practice. Nutrition consulting has become an increasingly viable and growing option for nutrition professionals. Whether planning to open their own practice, work for another health professional, or work as a health educator within a corporate setting, students need the skills to create their own practice within a practice. In this course, students gain a clear understanding of the consulting process and learn to recognize their own strengths as a consultant and to define and establish a strategic direction, as well as tips on running an office, setting fees, insurance needs, and developing an overall business plan and marketing strategy. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5912 Nutritional Consultation and Coaching
2
The focus of this course is effective nutrition counseling including the skills needed for building rapport, listening and interviewing skills, including motivational interviewing, and working with clients through various states of change. Blending together counseling and coaching techniques, students will learn how to identify key areas of intervention to maximize client’s success and how to engage with clients in a collaborative manner to co-create a dietary plan that works. Prerequisites: HHE 5750, HHE 5772.
HHE 5913 Nutrition for Healing Body and Mind
4
Nutritional approaches for working with clients with conditions such as diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, allergies, depression, heart disease and cancer are addressed in this course. This course introduces the foods, ways of eating, nutritional therapies and dietary approaches that help to bring about and maintain the most vibrant health with regard to gastrointestinal health, diabetes, allergies, autoimmune disease, depression, cancer and heart disease. This course will explore some of the underlying causes, nutritional deficiencies and lifestyle factors that contribute to these health conditions. Nutritional and herbal approaches for high cholesterol, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, food allergies, asthma, and breast cancer will also be discussed. Emphasis is on promoting and maintaining wellness. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5914 Holistic Approaches to Weight and Health
1
Approaches to weight management are examined, including an alternative model of looking at weight and size – Health At Every Size®. The psychology behind issues related to nourishment and poor body image are considered in this course, along with socio-cultural factors that influence weight and health. Prerequisite: HHE 5772
HHE 5915 Farm to Table
2
A thorough examination and analysis of the complete food chain will serve as a means of determining how and why our food supply may or may not supply healthy choices for any of us. Food production begins in the earth and continues through many necessary and sometimes unnecessary processes. This class will look at farming practices; to include the fundamentals of soil examination, soil enhancement, ecological effects on soil health, soil degradation, political soil extortion, the many types of farming from the large industrial farming system to small organic biodynamic farms, the kinds of fertilizing of soil and plants, the status and implementation of the water supply needed for agriculture to remain sustainable, harvesting, transporting, and finally the distribution and the profit motivated practices of getting the food to the consumer. This understanding is critical to offering sound, uncomplicated, appropriate, and healthy “food” knowledge and nutritional advice.
HHE 5920 Coaching Experiential
0.5-2.0
A seminar with variable units that enables faculty and students to create an active coaching community among those pursuing the Certificate at any given time. Faculty and students meet as needed to introduce cutting edge topics in coaching, report on new research and developments, and provide extra coaching practice as needed.
HHE 5922 Coaching Practicum B
1
Students are observed coaching and receive detailed feedback from a coaching mentor. Written and practical examinations are administered as the final step in obtaining the Coaching Certificate or Specialization (depending on student’s program). Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5924 Health, Disease, & Wellbeing for Health Coaches
1
Conventional medicine is compared to holistic concepts of health and wellbeing. Conventional risk factors and common chronic diseases are covered. Emphasis will be placed on holistic, health-promoting approaches such wellness wheels, continuums, salutogenesis, and similar wellness models. MA Students may substitute HHE 5710.
HHE 5926 Mind-Body Connection for Health Coaches
1
Students explore the field of mind-body medicine, including psychoneuroimmunology, integrative health, and whole-person approaches. Key topics of interest to health coaches are covered, including self-care practices, nutrition, spirituality, embodiment, and ecotherapy. MA Students may substitute HHE 5823.
Electives
Units
HHE 5928 Change Theory for Coaches
1
This course looks at what motivates people to make sustainable changes in their lives. Key change theories, such as the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and Self-Determination Theory, are explored. Coaching students explore how they can use these theories and models to help their clients realize their goals and achieve lasting change. MA Students may substitute HHE 5756.
HHE 5930 Weight and Body Image for Coaches
1
Individuals frequently seek out health and wellness coaches to lose weight and/or change their body shape/size. However, the evidence is overwhelming that weight-loss diets are ineffective long-term and often harmful. Moreover, body dissatisfaction is a growing and insidious problem in U.S. culture. In this course, health coaches learn how to work from a “do no harm” perspective to promote these clients’ long-term health and wellbeing. Coaches will also learn how to recognize more serious conditions, such as depression, eating disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder, as well as how to refer appropriately. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5932 Stress Management for Health Coaches
1
Stress may be the defining characteristic of 21st century life; no one is immune. Because every client is different though, health coaches need to understand stress and how it can affect us, and to appreciate the myriad of ways there are to manage it. This course examines the physiological, mental, and spiritual effects of stress before turning to a variety of holistic approaches to stress management that coaches will find useful in their practice. MA Students may substitute HHE 5842.
HHE 5934 Supervised Community Coaching
1-2
Coaching certificate students will gain valuable experience coaching under the supervision of experienced coaches. Variable units: 1-2 per quarter. Students are required to take 2 units total. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5940 Energy Models of Healing
2
This course investigates how health, illness, wholeness and healing may be defined and worked with in energy terms. The coursework involves in-depth inquiry into the many disciplines and traditions that contribute to energy healing as well as an analysis of the concepts and philosophies upon which these systems are based. We look at energy medicine from the perspectives of quantum physicists, biologists, consciousness and psi researchers, philosophers, spiritual healers, and medical intuitives. We will also investigate how energy modalities are viewed by mainstream medicine.
HHE 5941 Asian Approaches to Health and Healing
2
Two of the oldest holistic systems of medicine—Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine—are presented in this survey course. Their basic philosophy, principles, and standards of treatment will be explored both didactically and experientially. The course will not focus on comparing the two systems, but the diversities of each will be outlined with emphasis on their spiritual roots, cultural and social perspectives, and their growing appeal as global alternatives in health care.
HHE 5942 Arts in Healthcare
1
This course is an overview of the powerful role that the arts can play in fostering well-being and wholeness. Research is documenting connections between creative engagement and pain management, stress reduction, recovery and resilience. We will explore the writing, visual arts, theater and music programs being used within hospitals, healthcare facilities, and communities. Experiential creative exercises will allow participants to experience their own movement toward a fuller living experience. Coursework includes meditative practices and creative processes including the use of visual art, movement, and writing. No art experience is necessary. The course is focused on internal growth and development of the individual. Each student will apply the course content to their own personal and professional needs.
HHE 5943 Functional Nutrition Blood Chemistry
1
Designing an effective nutrition program is dependent on the establishment of an accurate nutritional profile guided by scientific approaches such as a comprehensive blood test. There is no test more accepted, efficient and affordable than a comprehensive blood chemistry profile. By learning how to interpret blood chemistry from a nutritional perspective, you can detect the shifts in physiological function and use it in a more preventative manner. Designing a truly individualized nutrition program will produce a more efficient and longer lasting result than just addressing one symptom or effect of the imbalance. You will also easily be able to track the effectiveness of any nutrition program. In this practicum you will learn the basics of nutritional blood chemistry and how to identify some common patterns of imbalance and how to develop a customized nutrition program based on the results.
HHE 5944 Nutrition for Women’s Health
1
As women are living longer than ever, it is important for women to address their health so that they can remain vital and thrive throughout the life cycle. A woman’s health profile can dramatically change from one decade to the next. In this class students will learn about using diet, lifestyle and nutrients to balance hormones throughout life. We will also discuss the relationship of blood sugar metabolism, stress, thyroid health, inflammation and gut health to fertility, weight issues, mood shifts, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, fibroids, perimenopause, osteoporosis and menopause.
HHE 5945 Transitions & Grief
1
One of the most important functions of a health educator or health coach is to help clients navigate transitions and transformative change. Too often, we forget that a key element of many kinds of change is releasing our attachment to past ways of being and going through an appropriate grieving process. Students will learn about different approaches to coping with grief and how they can support clients who find themselves grieving various types of loss.
Electives
Units
HHE 5928 Change Theory for Coaches
1
This course looks at what motivates people to make sustainable changes in their lives. Key change theories, such as the Health Belief Model, the Transtheoretical Model, and Self-Determination Theory, are explored. Coaching students explore how they can use these theories and models to help their clients realize their goals and achieve lasting change. MA Students may substitute HHE 5756.
HHE 5930 Weight and Body Image for Coaches
1
Individuals frequently seek out health and wellness coaches to lose weight and/or change their body shape/size. However, the evidence is overwhelming that weight-loss diets are ineffective long-term and often harmful. Moreover, body dissatisfaction is a growing and insidious problem in U.S. culture. In this course, health coaches learn how to work from a “do no harm” perspective to promote these clients’ long-term health and wellbeing. Coaches will also learn how to recognize more serious conditions, such as depression, eating disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder, as well as how to refer appropriately. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5932 Stress Management for Health Coaches
1
Stress may be the defining characteristic of 21st century life; no one is immune. Because every client is different though, health coaches need to understand stress and how it can affect us, and to appreciate the myriad of ways there are to manage it. This course examines the physiological, mental, and spiritual effects of stress before turning to a variety of holistic approaches to stress management that coaches will find useful in their practice. MA Students may substitute HHE 5842.
HHE 5934 Supervised Community Coaching
1-2
Coaching certificate students will gain valuable experience coaching under the supervision of experienced coaches. Variable units: 1-2 per quarter. Students are required to take 2 units total. Prerequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5940 Energy Models of Healing
2
This course investigates how health, illness, wholeness and healing may be defined and worked with in energy terms. The coursework involves in-depth inquiry into the many disciplines and traditions that contribute to energy healing as well as an analysis of the concepts and philosophies upon which these systems are based. We look at energy medicine from the perspectives of quantum physicists, biologists, consciousness and psi researchers, philosophers, spiritual healers, and medical intuitives. We will also investigate how energy modalities are viewed by mainstream medicine.
HHE 5941 Asian Approaches to Health and Healing
2
Two of the oldest holistic systems of medicine—Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine—are presented in this survey course. Their basic philosophy, principles, and standards of treatment will be explored both didactically and experientially. The course will not focus on comparing the two systems, but the diversities of each will be outlined with emphasis on their spiritual roots, cultural and social perspectives, and their growing appeal as global alternatives in health care.
HHE 5942 Arts in Healthcare
1
This course is an overview of the powerful role that the arts can play in fostering well-being and wholeness. Research is documenting connections between creative engagement and pain management, stress reduction, recovery and resilience. We will explore the writing, visual arts, theater and music programs being used within hospitals, healthcare facilities, and communities. Experiential creative exercises will allow participants to experience their own movement toward a fuller living experience. Coursework includes meditative practices and creative processes including the use of visual art, movement, and writing. No art experience is necessary. The course is focused on internal growth and development of the individual. Each student will apply the course content to their own personal and professional needs.
HHE 5943 Functional Nutrition Blood Chemistry
1
Designing an effective nutrition program is dependent on the establishment of an accurate nutritional profile guided by scientific approaches such as a comprehensive blood test. There is no test more accepted, efficient and affordable than a comprehensive blood chemistry profile. By learning how to interpret blood chemistry from a nutritional perspective, you can detect the shifts in physiological function and use it in a more preventative manner. Designing a truly individualized nutrition program will produce a more efficient and longer lasting result than just addressing one symptom or effect of the imbalance. You will also easily be able to track the effectiveness of any nutrition program. In this practicum you will learn the basics of nutritional blood chemistry and how to identify some common patterns of imbalance and how to develop a customized nutrition program based on the results.
HHE 5944 Nutrition for Women’s Health
1
As women are living longer than ever, it is important for women to address their health so that they can remain vital and thrive throughout the life cycle. A woman’s health profile can dramatically change from one decade to the next. In this class students will learn about using diet, lifestyle and nutrients to balance hormones throughout life. We will also discuss the relationship of blood sugar metabolism, stress, thyroid health, inflammation and gut health to fertility, weight issues, mood shifts, PMS, PCOS, endometriosis, fibroids, perimenopause, osteoporosis and menopause.
HHE 5945 Transitions & Grief
1
One of the most important functions of a health educator or health coach is to help clients navigate transitions and transformative change. Too often, we forget that a key element of many kinds of change is releasing our attachment to past ways of being and going through an appropriate grieving process. Students will learn about different approaches to coping with grief and how they can support clients who find themselves grieving various types of loss.

If you’re here, you’ve already begun.

BA Legal Studies
Concentration in Advanced
Legal Technology

82%

of Graduates Working in Legal Field within a Month Post-Grad

30%+

Number of Program Alum that Move on to Law School After-Grad

100%

Faculty are Practicing Attorneys

1

Only ABA Approved Bachelor’s Degree in Northern California

Overview

There is a growing need for paralegals and legal professionals to fill the technology gap in the legal world. Students and legal professionals who complete this concentration will immediately contribute to employers with regard to legal technology use. Among other responsibilities, they will be able to suggest appropriate software for billing, word processing, discovery document processing, e-discovery case management, document organization, and case management, as well as use various software programs to make common tasks in a legal environment more efficient and cost effective.

Highlights

  • Concentration may be embedded into the BA Legal Studies or the Paralegal Certificate program without requiring any additional units
  • Non-degree-seeking students may enroll through JFKU Continuing Education
  • Most courses taken online

Big things start with a simple yes.

Concentration Curriculum

REQUIREMENTS

This 12-unit concentration may be completely embedded in the Legal Studies Paralegal Certificate program. 4 of the 12 units are already required for the certificate, and the remaining 8 units may be taken to satisfy the 8 units of legal specialty coursework also required for the certificate.

The following 4 courses are required to complete the concentration.

Courses
Units
PLS3010 Legal Technology Applications
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Winter and Summer quarters. This course provides training on software used for communication, creating legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Acrobat, and Outlook. Students will be exposed to legal-specific software in terms of billing, document management, case management, and trial presentation software used in our legal community. Specifically, students will perform hands-on training and exercises in: Clio, TimeMap, Relativity, Nuance, Workshare, Sanction, and TrialDirector.
PLS3046 Project Management in E-Discovery
2
This 2-unit course is offered completely online in the Winter quarter. Paralegals are often depended on to coordinate much of the discovery process in civil litigation. Taking on this role requires that paralegals are familiar with and understand e-discovery rules, requirements, and procedures. Students in this course will learn the basic principles of project management, and how to apply these established principles to each phase of the e-discovery process.
Courses
Units
PLS3047 Advanced Legal Technology
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Spring quarter. This course provides advanced training on software used for communication, and the creation and management of legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, FileSite, Workshare Compare, and NetDocuments. Students will learn how to use software commonly utilized in law firms and other legal environments for team collaboration with a focus on the capabilities of Office 365, including, but not limited to, Sway, OneNote and SharePoint. Students will also learn about the latest legal-related apps.
PLS3048 Trial Presentation Skills
2
This 2-unit hybrid course is offered in the Spring quarter. Students are required to attend four in-person sessions. In this hybrid course, students will gain live, hands-on experience with the legal trial presentation software TrialDirector. Specifically, students will learn the basic rules of evidence, and to prepare and display trial exhibits, and synchronize deposition videos. Students will also learn how to set-up the equipment needed for live trial presentation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the opportunity (optional) to gain experience with live trial presentation by operating TrialDirector in the summer mock trials for the law school.
Courses
Units
PLS3047 Advanced Legal Technology
4
This 4-unit course is offered completely online in the Spring quarter. This course provides advanced training on software used for communication, and the creation and management of legal documents and presentations in a legal environment, e.g., Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, FileSite, Workshare Compare, and NetDocuments. Students will learn how to use software commonly utilized in law firms and other legal environments for team collaboration with a focus on the capabilities of Office 365, including, but not limited to, Sway, OneNote and SharePoint. Students will also learn about the latest legal-related apps.
PLS3048 Trial Presentation Skills
2
This 2-unit hybrid course is offered in the Spring quarter. Students are required to attend four in-person sessions. In this hybrid course, students will gain live, hands-on experience with the legal trial presentation software TrialDirector. Specifically, students will learn the basic rules of evidence, and to prepare and display trial exhibits, and synchronize deposition videos. Students will also learn how to set-up the equipment needed for live trial presentation. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the opportunity (optional) to gain experience with live trial presentation by operating TrialDirector in the summer mock trials for the law school.

Faculty

Change is possible. In fact, it’s already begun.

Sport Psychology

40+

AASP Certified/Approved Supervisors

9

Professional Development Seminars by Global Speakers/Year

4

Internships in Diverse Environments Completed by Students

Sport Psychology Programs

Dual MA Sport Psychology and PsyD

This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within six years of full time study.

MA Sport Psychology

Provides rigorous training to help students become effective sport psychology practitioners.

Grad Certificate in Sport Psychology

Provides psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and mental skills coaches the necessary coursework required by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) for certification as a consultant.

Faculty

You found the door. So open it.

Counseling Psychology

39,157

Counseling Hours Performed by Students Each Year

80%

Pass Rate for First Time Test Takers (MFT and LPCC)

1:1

Each Student Assigned a Faculty Advisor

Overview

Counseling psychology trains future licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Clinical Counselors to work with individuals, couples, and families in a variety of settings.

The programs emphasize development of the self as therapist; multicultural diversity and inclusion; social justice; and in-depth understanding of a wide range of individual and systemic counseling theories.

Counseling Psychology Programs

MA Counseling Psychology

Prepares students for future clinical work in county and community based agencies, residential and addiction treatment programs, inpatient and outpatient hospital settings, health care facilities, veterans’ centers, school districts, private and nonprofit outpatient clinics, and private practice settings.

MA Counseling Psychology - Holistic

With over 40 years of Holistic education, this family of programs incorporates a unique learning environment designed to support students in an integral model toward personal growth, human potential and service to others.

Academic Certificate in Trauma Studies

Developed to give practitioners both the foundational knowledge and practical skills necessary to work effectively and humanely with trauma sufferers. JFK University Certificate in Trauma Studies offers is available in both one and two-year formats.

Faculty

Big things begin with a simple yes.

Clinical Psychology

13:1

Student - Faculty Ratio in the PsyD Program

84%

of PsyD Students Complete the Program

7:1

Student - Faculty Ratio in the BA Psychology Program

18

Months to Complete BA Psychology

Overview

Clinical psychology is the largest branch of the field of psychology that integrates science, theory and clinical practice to assess and treat a broad spectrum of mental health and behavioral medicine concerns.

The demand for mental health professionals, particularly those with doctoral degrees, is expected to increase over the next decade.  

Clinical Psychology Programs

Doctor of Psychology

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology is designed for individuals seeking the highest level of training to become hands-on practitioners in the field of psychology.

Dual MA Sport Psychology and PsyD

This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within six years of full time study.

BA in Psychology

Engages students in a lively process of intellectual inquiry, self-discovery, critical thinking, creative synthesis, and interpersonal communication.

Faculty

Set something in motion with a simple yes.

Graduate Certificate
in Sport Psychology

40+

AASP-Certified/Approved Supervisors

1

Year - Approximate Time to Completion

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person
  • Hybrid
  • Online

Quick Facts

  • 1 Year Full-Time
  • Part-Time Option
  • 20 Units
  • Evening Option

Campus Location

Overview

JFK University’s Graduate Certificate in Sport Psychology is designed to provide psychologists, marriage and family therapists, and mental skills coaches the necessary coursework required by the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) for certification as a consultant. This certificate also gives athletes, coaches, trainers, and others in the sport and fitness arenas an introduction to the world of sport psychology.

Highlights

  • Completed in approximately one year
  • Additional fieldwork opportunities
  • Available to fulfill AASP contact hour requirements
  • Online or in-person options

Curriculum

This 20-unit certificate can be completed online or on-site and will provide knowledge in areas of sport psychology and kinesiology. If a student is interested in completing fieldwork for an applied experience or to fulfill the 200 contact hour AASP requirements, 10 units of fieldwork and supervision (PSP 5280) can be added on to the certificate program.

Fall
Units
PSP 5800A Sport Psychology A
3
This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5815 Performance Enhancement A
3
Theory and practice of optimal performance are explored in the realm of sport behavior. Includes motivation theory, stress management, visualization, and mental rehearsal.
Winter
Units
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport OR
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP 5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP 5815.
Spring
Units
PSP 5800B Sport Psychology B OR
3
Prereq: PSP 5800A and preferably an Internship/applied sport psych experience This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5817 Performance Enhancement C
3
Prereq: PSP 5816 and preferably an internship/applied sport psych experience This advanced optimal-performance course emphasizes sport psychology skill development and addresses different styles of consulting. Students will be challenged by case studies and will role-play actual consulting scenarios in which they can develop and refine their own consulting style with feedback from their peers.
Summer
Units
PSP 5833 Kinesiology OR
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
Winter
Units
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport OR
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP 5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP 5815.
Summer
Units
PSP 5833 Kinesiology OR
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
PSP 5814 Comprehensive Exploration of Diversity in Sport
4
This course is designed to offer students an overview of historical and current topics relevant to the understanding of diversity in sport. Students will be exposed to the historical context of how diversity issues have impacted the development of sport. Students will understand the complex nature of gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, age, and disability as it relates to current sport practices. Students will also be exposed to practical strategies for facilitating acceptance of diversity within individual and team sports.

Faculty

Maybe lasts forever. Yes changes the world.

Master of Arts in Sport Psychology - Clinical PsyD Dual Degree

40+

AASP - Certified/Approved Supervisors

9

Professional Development Seminars Given by Global Speakers

92%

PsyD Completion Rate

13:1

PsyD Student to Faculty Ratio

Ways to Learn

  • In-Person
  • Hybrid

Quick Facts

  • 6 Years Full-Time
  • Part-Time Option
  • 222 Units
  • Evening Option

Overview

For individuals interested in both sport and clinical psychology, John F. Kennedy University offers an innovative program preparing students to work in clinical settings as well as with athletes in a sport setting. Individuals work toward earning an MA in Sport Psychology and a PsyD degree concurrently. This program provides a unique training opportunity with clinical clients, athletes, as well as athletes with clinical concerns. And it prepares you to apply the skills and knowledge developed from the fields of sport and clinical psychology.

Read More

Highlights

  • Gain clinical competence in working with athletes
  • Innovative linked program allows for completion of both degrees within six-years full-time
  • Having both degrees enables graduates to use the title Sport Psychologist

Both the Master of Arts in Sport Psychology and the PsyD offer the highest level of available training in applied sport and clinical psychology respectively. (Unlike a research-based Ph.D., the PsyD program is designed to produce practitioners, not researchers, while providing the same high level of scholarly study.) And the missions of the two programs are similar: both provide a strong foundation in counseling skills and train students to serve multicultural and diverse populations.

In the past, students could earn a Master’s degree in two years and a Doctorate in Psychology in an additional four years. This innovative linked program allows completion of both degrees within five years of intensive, full-time study (part-time options are available). Students earn their Master of Arts in Sport Psychology after their third year and they earn their PsyD after their fifth year. With both degrees, graduates are able to use the title “Sport Psychologist” and apply to sit for the Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP) certification exam. Graduates also earn eligibility to take the psychology licensing exam for the state of California.

Requirements

PsyD core coursework: 128 units (including externship)

Electives: 16 units minimum: May be taken anytime after Spring Quarter of Year 2.

Total Units for years 2-5 must equal or exceed 144

Internship = 36 units

Total Sport Psychology units = 42
Total PsyD program units = 180
Total units for MA/PsyD = 222

Prerequisites

  • Introduction to Psychology
  • Theories of Personality
  • Diversity-related course
  • Statistics

Curriculum

Fall - First Year
Units
PSP 5800A Sport Psychology A
3
This is one of the main introductory courses in the Sport Psychology Program. It covers the main theoretical approaches in this area. The course will encourage students to begin to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to working in the field with performers.
PSP 5819 Social & Historical Issues in Sport
2
The course examines selected topics within the sociology and history of sport. Particular emphasis will be given to issues related to the potential of sport to benefit society and its potential to reinforce existing social problems. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences within sport and to explore in detail one area of special interest within the history and sociology of sport. The course offers an analysis of sport as a social institution and the interrelations between sport and societal subsystems, as well as a consideration of the attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with sport. Analysis of contemporary problems associated with sport will be made, with ties made to their historic origins; such problems include race relations, the traditional and emergent role of women, aggression and violence, and political and economic concerns.
PSP 5815 Performance Enhancement A
3
Theory and practice of optimal performance are explored in the realm of sport behavior. Includes motivation theory, stress management, visualization, and mental rehearsal.
PSP 5803A Ethics and Professional Issues in Sport Psychology A
2
Examines ethical issues that impact the field of applied sport psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interaction with an experienced professional, students learn how ethical issues influence consultation and develop ways to deal with ethical dilemmas that may arise in sport psychology.
PSP 9020 Town Hall Meeting
0
PSP 5002 Writing Workshop
0
No Fee
Winter - First Year
Units
PSP 5811 Counseling Skills A
3
Introduction to basic counseling skills and techniques relevant to sport psychology consulting in a safe and supervised environment. Included are tools for building rapport, empathy, listening and life-development skills, treatment versus consulting, ethics, closure, and termination. Students will also develop skills in presenting sport psychology intervention material.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP5815.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
Spring - First Year
Units
PSP 5822 Team Building
3
The course examines selected topics within the social psychology and sociology of sport. Particular emphasis will be given to issues related to group behavior and dynamics, leadership, interpersonal communication, the potential of sport to benefit society, and its potential to reinforce existent social problems. The course offers and analysis of sport as a social institution and the interrelations between sport and societal subsystems, as well as a consideration of the attitudes, values, and behaviors associated with sport. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experiences within sport. Analysis of contemporary problems associated with sport will be made; such problems include race relations, the traditional and emergent role of women, aggression and violence, and political and economic concerns. Additionally, students will learn team building and communication skills and strategies that will enable them to effectively work within the current framework of sport in society. The course will examine the practical and theoretical application of group process and social psychology in relation to working in the field of sport psychology. The students will gain an understanding of group behavior and dynamics and will be able to use this knowledge with diverse populations. Students will learn to recognize ethical issues in relation to working with groups and will examine their interpersonal and professional style.
PSP 5804 Assessment Strategies
3
Examines a variety of assessment methods used to gain information from athletes, coaches, or teams utilizing sport psychology professionals. Topics to be covered include the role of assessment in the initial stages of work with athletes, methods of informal assessment, sport-specific assessment tools, issues of reliability and validity with instruments, and the ethical use of measures in the practice of sport psychology. Online or in residence.
PSP 9085 Fieldwork Exam
Prereqs: PSP 5803A, PSP 5815 and PSP 5816

$75 Fee
PSP 9090 Comprehensive. Written Examination
0
Prereqs:PSP 5800A, PSP 5803A, PSP 5804, PSP 5811, PSP 5822, PSP 5815, and PSP 5816

$75 Fee

Comprehensive written examination covering material of Phase I, to be taken at the end of Phase I. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office
PSP 5279 Fieldwork Orientation
$75 Fee
PSP 9020 Town Hall Meeting
0
Summer - First Year
Units
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience: Fieldwork I
3
Covers field placement and individual and group supervision. The field-placement aspect requires students to intern at a site working with athletes and applying skills learned in the classroom. Individual and group supervision involves one-on-one meetings, discussions, case presentations, and role-playing and covers ethical issues. Provides students with a supportive environment for discussion and for exploring issues which pertain to their fieldwork experience. This course may be retaken for additional credit.
PSP 5834 Motor Learning and Performance
1
This course will teach students how to apply the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of real-world situations. Students will learn to identify solutions that address many of the issues and obstacles encountered when teaching and learning motor skills.
Fall - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self-reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression.

Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7007 Clinical Interviewing Skills I
3
This course is the first of a two course sequence. It is designed to teach students fundamental clinical interviewing skills. Students will learn the basic attending skills required to establish and maintain a therapeutic relationship, including empathy, listening, reflecting, focusing and formulating questions. Students will also practice skills related to informed consent, confidentiality, and cultural sensitivity. The importance of taking into consideration contextual variables such as culture and ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, migration, political conditions during the interview process is emphasized.
PSD 7xxx Psychopathology I & Lab
3
PSD 7225 Human Development
4
This course introduces students to empirically-based developmental psychology theories with an emphasis on conceptual issues and scientific methods in the study of developmental psychology. It teaches students to comprehend, assess, and evaluate scientific research on child development, and provides an essential understanding of child development for clinical activities. Students are taught to examine the interrelationship between physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development in infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence.
PSP 9000 Professional Development Seminar
0
Offered every quarter
Winter - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7008 Clinical Interviewing Skills II
3
This course is the second in a two course sequence. It builds upon the foundational clinical interviewing skills acquired in PSD 7007. Students will utilize these skills in establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship. Students will acquire additional skills such as confrontation and summarizing. In addition, specific situations such as suicide assessment, interviewing couples and younger clients will be addressed. The course will also explore clinical skills such as case formulation and report writing, peer supervision, the mental status examination, assessment of the client’s presenting problems, issues with difficult clients, and making appropriate referrals. Prerequisite: PSD 7007.
PSD 7xxxx Psychopathology II & Lab
3
PSD 7xxx Critical Analysis of Clinical Research: A Problem-Based Learning Lab
2
Spring - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7123 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course introduces the basic tenets of CBT and the various forms of this perspective. Discussions of the philosophy of CBT and the structure of a CBT case conceptualization set the stage for more detailed work with the kinds of disorders for which CBT has demonstrated effectiveness. The interventions and evaluation procedures commonly used by CBT practitioners are demonstrated and discussed with regard to their applicability to various forms of psychological, emotional, or social problems. Consideration of the applications and limitations of CBT to diverse populations are woven into the fabric of each discussion.
PSD 7141 Ethical and Legal Issues in Professional Psychology
3
This course focuses upon the legal and ethical issues related to the practice of psychology. Students explore issues which include, but are not limited to, licensing, scope of practice, competence, informed consent, client welfare, confidentiality (and its exceptions), and professional conduct. Also covered are issues related to the treatment of minors, couples, groups, and the use of technology in clinical psychology, as well as issues related to working with individuals with cultural, contextual, and individual differences from those of the provider. In addition, students will be introduced to methods of critically evaluating their professional behavior. The course emphasizes contemporary professional ethics and statutory, regulatory, and decisional laws that delineate the profession’s scope of practice and role of the psychologist.
PSD 7151 Quantitative Methods
3
This course is the first of a three course sequence. This course presents an overview of psychometrics and quantitative research design and methodology. In addition, the course covers ethics in research, issues of cultural diversity relevant to the process of research, and an introduction to data analysis using SPSS. The focus of the course is on acquisition of skills that permit students to critically evaluate published professional literature.
PsyD COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM I
June
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSD 7114 Psychometrics: The Basics of Assessment
2
This course is designed to provide first-year students with an overview of psychometric principles and introduce them to the various types of psychological assessment tools such as cognitive and intellectual testing and measurement of personality. The course covers the foundations of psychological assessment, tools used in psychological measurement (e.g., test construction) essential characteristics of psychological measurement (e.g., reliability and validity), and the application of measurement ( e.g., tests of intelligence, personality assessment). This course is a prerequisite for the Assessment Series courses (PSD 7115, 7116, and 7117).
PSD 7131 Psychology and Treatment of Substance Abuse
3
This course focuses on the identification, assessment, and treatment of individuals who are abusing substances. The influence of socio-economic status, cultural context, and the variations in substance use and abuse across groups will be considered. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PSD 7124 Family Systems Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course offers the basics in family systems theory and the historical context from which it arose. Students learn the application of systems theory to the treatment of a variety of family systems. A comparison and critique of systems theory from a postmodern perspective is included. The limitations of systems theory to families of diverse backgrounds are considered, and modifications of systems models that better meet such families’ needs are proposed.
PSD 7xxx Group Clinical Skills
2
Winter - First Year
Units
PSP 5811 Counseling Skills A
3
Introduction to basic counseling skills and techniques relevant to sport psychology consulting in a safe and supervised environment. Included are tools for building rapport, empathy, listening and life-development skills, treatment versus consulting, ethics, closure, and termination. Students will also develop skills in presenting sport psychology intervention material.
PSP 5816 Performance Enhancement B
3
Prereq: PSP5815 Focus is on individual and team consultation. Features role-play, case study, and videotaping. Coursework includes introduction to external field placement opportunities. Second half of a two-quarter sequence with PSP5815.
PSP 5833 Kinesiology
4
This course introduces students to each of the major biophysical sub-disciplines of kinesiology, anatomy, biomechanics, exercise physiology, motor control, and sport and exercise psychology. Includes an integrated study of human movement and applies this knowledge to human performance and physical activity across the lifespan. Concepts in the various sub-fields of kinesiology are examined and career opportunities in the field of kinesiology are explored. Students will also gain a better understanding of the course concepts through projects and class discussions.
Summer - First Year
Units
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience: Fieldwork I
3
Covers field placement and individual and group supervision. The field-placement aspect requires students to intern at a site working with athletes and applying skills learned in the classroom. Individual and group supervision involves one-on-one meetings, discussions, case presentations, and role-playing and covers ethical issues. Provides students with a supportive environment for discussion and for exploring issues which pertain to their fieldwork experience. This course may be retaken for additional credit.
PSP 5834 Motor Learning and Performance
1
This course will teach students how to apply the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of real-world situations. Students will learn to identify solutions that address many of the issues and obstacles encountered when teaching and learning motor skills.
Winter - Second Year
Units
IPS I - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7035 Ethnographic Placement I: Sport-Focused
2
Students are placed for eight hours per week in settings, generally schools or community mental health agencies, which allow them to engage in an ethnographic observation/participation of individuals and groups that are culturally different from the students in significant ways. The ethnographic placement is designed to enhance clinical and cultural competence by broadening the student’s exposure and appreciation of “others,” while gaining an indepth understanding of his or her own assumptions, stereotypes, and biases. Co-requisites: PSD 7046, PSD 7047.
PSD 7046 Group Dynamics
1
Students explore the foundations of group therapy and engage in group process over the course of three quarters. They reflect upon the group dynamics of their ethnographic placement, their own collective experience within the IPS and the range of perspectives encountered in the assigned academic reading. They also explore the meanings of cultural differences in a group context. In the Fall quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the beginning stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with a self- reflective focus on the multicultural course content. In the Winter quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on the working stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection as well as multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. In the Spring quarter, students explore the foundations of group therapy with particular emphasis on termination, and the closing stages of group development. Students also participate in group process with particular emphasis on self-reflection, as well as clinical considerations of multicultural and group dynamics related to power, privilege, and oppression. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7047.
PSD 7047 Multicultural Awareness in Professional Psychology
2
In this part of the IPS curriculum students examine and critically consider contemporary and empirical literature in multicultural psychology. Students explore the effects of power, privilege, and oppression on psychological functioning. Students are encouraged to develop self-awareness and a heightened sensitivity to their own values, cultural assumptions, beliefs, and biases to understand how these serve as both resources and barriers to the effective delivery of mental health services to diverse populations. In the Fall quarter, students examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to immigration, social class, race, privilege, and oppression. In the Winter quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to sexual orientation and gender. In the Spring quarter, students will examine and critically consider foundational and current literature in multicultural psychology, particularly as it relates to disability, ageism and social justice. Co-requisites: PSD 7035, PSD 7046.
PSD 7008 Clinical Interviewing Skills II
3
This course is the second in a two course sequence. It builds upon the foundational clinical interviewing skills acquired in PSD 7007. Students will utilize these skills in establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship. Students will acquire additional skills such as confrontation and summarizing. In addition, specific situations such as suicide assessment, interviewing couples and younger clients will be addressed. The course will also explore clinical skills such as case formulation and report writing, peer supervision, the mental status examination, assessment of the client’s presenting problems, issues with difficult clients, and making appropriate referrals. Prerequisite: PSD 7007.
PSD 7xxxx Psychopathology II & Lab
3
PSD 7xxx Critical Analysis of Clinical Research: A Problem-Based Learning Lab
2
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSD 7114 Psychometrics: The Basics of Assessment
2
This course is designed to provide first-year students with an overview of psychometric principles and introduce them to the various types of psychological assessment tools such as cognitive and intellectual testing and measurement of personality. The course covers the foundations of psychological assessment, tools used in psychological measurement (e.g., test construction) essential characteristics of psychological measurement (e.g., reliability and validity), and the application of measurement ( e.g., tests of intelligence, personality assessment). This course is a prerequisite for the Assessment Series courses (PSD 7115, 7116, and 7117).
PSD 7131 Psychology and Treatment of Substance Abuse
3
This course focuses on the identification, assessment, and treatment of individuals who are abusing substances. The influence of socio-economic status, cultural context, and the variations in substance use and abuse across groups will be considered. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PSD 7124 Family Systems Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course offers the basics in family systems theory and the historical context from which it arose. Students learn the application of systems theory to the treatment of a variety of family systems. A comparison and critique of systems theory from a postmodern perspective is included. The limitations of systems theory to families of diverse backgrounds are considered, and modifications of systems models that better meet such families’ needs are proposed.
PSD 7xxx Group Clinical Skills
2
Fall - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Applied Diagnosis
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7115 Assessment I & Lab
4
This is the first of a three course sequence. This course is designed to provide the student with a broad understanding of the intellectual/ cognitive assessment of adults, adolescents, and children. Teaching will include administration, scoring, and interpretation of some of the widely used cognitive, achievement, and neuropsychological screening measures: the Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV), the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-V), the Wide Range Achievement Test 4 (WRAT 4), and the Bender II. Students will also learn about alternative cognitive measures including the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence 3 (TONI 3) and the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-IV (PPVT-IV) . Students will also be taught how to conduct a thorough mental status exam with clients. The historical, cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic contexts of assessment and evaluation will be emphasized. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7114.
PSD 7122 Psychodynamic Theory & Applications to Diverse Populations
3
This course reviews drive theory and ego psychology, object-relations theory, self-psychology, and intersubjective approaches to therapy. The paradigm shift in psychoanalytic thought from a drive theory to a relational theory model and the implications of this shift for clinical practice are examined. A critical review of psychodynamic theory and practice from a cultural perspective is included.
PSD 7250 Statistics
3
This is the second course in a three course sequence. It is designed to provide students with knowledge of inferential statistics through two-way ANOVA and post hoc analysis with an introduction to selected multivariate techniques. Emphasis is placed on conceptual understanding and appropriate use of statistics including knowledge of assumptions and limitations of specific techniques. Critical review of published empirical literature and critique of culturally appropriate analysis and interpretation is an integral part of the course. Students are introduced to the dissertation process and are guided to begin formulating a dissertation research question. Prerequisite: PSD 7151.
Winter - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Case Formulation
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7116 Assessment II & Lab
4
This is the second of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with a focused understanding of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Millon clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and their adolescent counterparts. Students will learn about the psychometric properties of the measures as well as learn to administer, score, and interpret them. Other personality measures such as the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory will be introduced. Additionally, the field of therapeutic assessment will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data while incorporating historical and socio-cultural contextual information, and providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7115.
PSD 7107 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
This course offers a practical, clinical, and evidence-based description of the functional anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system. Normal and abnormal development and functioning of the nervous system is presented, including concepts of neuronal physiology and maturation, sleep, arousal and attention, acquiring and retaining information, and various aspects of a person’s ability to act on and adapt to changing environments. Application of this information to clinical practice, research, and personal experience is encouraged. Gender, age, and racial/ethnic differences in physiological processes, as they relate to behavior and experience, are presented in light of new neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological research findings. The ways in which psychological symptoms can arise from physical problems will be discussed to facilitate accurate and comprehensive clinical diagnosis.
PSD 7251 Qualitative Research
2
This is the third course in a three course sequence. It introduces students to specific qualitative methodologies in detail: phenomenology, grounded theory, and qualitative content analysis. Additional forms of qualitative research are also introduced, including consensual qualitative research, qualitative meta-analysis, and case-study designs. The philosophical and methodological issues which underlie qualitative research will be discussed. The course includes lecture, discussion, and practice assignments covering interviewing and qualitative data analysis. Prerequisite: PSD 7250.
Spring - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Informed Treatment Planning
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7117 Assessment III & Lab
4
This is the third of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge and experience in the area of projective personality assessment. Students will learn to administer, code, score, and interpret the Rorschach using the Rorschach Performance Assessment System. Students will also learn to utilize other projective assessment techniques and the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank. Current research in the field of projective assessment will be presented. Multicultural considerations will be integrated throughout the course, and the historical and sociocultural contexts of evaluation will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data, providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of cognitive, personality, and projective assessment findings within the context of history, mental status, behavioral observations, SES and culture. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7116.
PSD 7160 Psychopharmacology
3
This course prepares students to evaluate and direct clients regarding psychiatric medications. Pharmacokinetics, the major classes of psychiatric medications, referral processes, and how to follow-up with clients on medications will be discussed. Students will gain an understanding of the practical, ethical, diversity-related, and philosophical advantages and limitations of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of clients with various psychological disorders. Prerequisites: PSD 7016, PSD 7107.
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal I
1
This is the first of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will create a prospectus for their proposed studies, begin the process of recruiting a dissertation committee, as well as outline and begin drafting a Review of the Literature relevant to their proposed research. Prerequisite: PSD 7251.
Summer - Third Year
Units
PSD 7104 Social & Cultural Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of Social Psychology and other domains of psychological research addressing the nature and influence of culture, with an emphasis on social psychology research and theory relevant to multiculturalism, social justice and professional ethics. The course will also address some key pieces of organizational psychology research which could also be classified as social psychology.
PSD 7108 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of classical and recent research in the areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, as well as theories of emotion. While the emphasis of the course is on the science of psychology, the relevance of these models to diversity-competent clinical practice is also reviewed.
PSD 7xxx Psychology of Trauma
3
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal II
2
This is the second of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will continue to expand and refine their Literature Reviews, while drafting the Methods chapter of their dissertation proposals. Students also finalize their dissertation committees this quarter. Prerequisite: PSD 7252.
COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM II
(Sep)
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience
3
Note: This can be done any quarter once it has been confirmed that the student has the pre-reqs to start PSP internship work*
Fall - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Integrative Case Conceptualization and Treatment Planning
1
PSD 7003 History & Systems
3
This course discusses the evolution of modern psychology with regard to theories, systems and practices. It is grounded in a broad historical understanding that builds a framework for understanding the contemporary field of psychology, examining the philosophical, epistemological, cultural, and sociopolitical contexts and consequences of the major systems in the development of contemporary psychology.
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal III
2
This is the third of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will complete drafts of their dissertation proposal and Human Participants Review materials, and conduct a mock defense of their dissertation proposals. Prerequisite: PSD 7253.
PSP 5817 Performance Enhancement C
3
This advanced optimal-performance course emphasizes sport psychology skill development and addresses different styles of consulting. Students will be challenged by case studies and will role-play actual consulting scenarios in which they can develop and refine their own consulting style with feedback from their peers.
Winter - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Clinical Communication
1
PSD 7309.x Clinical Topics in Sport Psychology
3
EXPECTED - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
Spring - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Professional Development and Lifelong Learning
1
PSD 7xxx Internship Application Workshop
0
PSP 5800B Sport Psychology B
3
Take after 2nd PSP internship - This is an advanced course that is the second in a two-part series. The main theoretical approaches in the field of sport psychology will be revisited and addressed from an integrated perspective. The students will be expected to synthesize the various theoretical perspectives and research findings and show how this integrated perspective can help their work with performers. The course will continue to engage students to think critically about the research presented and how it relates to their work in the field as a practitioner.
CLINICAL PROFICIENCY EXAM
April
Summer - Fourth Year
Units
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
FINAL DEADLINE - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
PSP 9091 Comprehensive Oral Examination
0
(When all MA requirements are completed) $75 Fee Comprehensive oral examination covering material in all phases of the program to be taken in the student’s last quarter. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office.
PSP 9100 Exit Meeting
0
Winter - Third Year
Units
IPS II - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7135 Practicum II
2
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7146 and PSD 7147. The second-year practicum is a clinical placement where students apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired in the first year. PSD 7135 gives students credit for their practicum work. In class, students do weekly practicum check-ins and formal case presentations of clients. Theoretical conceptualizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7146, PSD 7147.
PSD 7xxx Case Formulation
1
PSD 7147 Multicultural Proficiency in Professional Psychology
1
This course is taught over three quarters, in conjunction with PSD 7135 and PSD 7146. This course examines the ways diverse cultural perspectives are experienced within the clinical interchanges of psychotherapy. In addition, there will be a focus on clinical treatment interventions with specific populations and exploration of their relative effectiveness and the impacts on both therapist and client. Evidence-supported treatment approaches with specific populations are highlighted in this course. Prerequisites: PSD 7008, PSD 7016, PSD 7035, PSD 7141. Co-requisites: PSD 7135, PSD 7146.
PSD 7116 Assessment II & Lab
4
This is the second of a three course sequence. It is designed to provide the student with a focused understanding of the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory-2 (MMPI-2), the Millon clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III), and their adolescent counterparts. Students will learn about the psychometric properties of the measures as well as learn to administer, score, and interpret them. Other personality measures such as the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) and the Beck Depression Inventory will be introduced. Additionally, the field of therapeutic assessment will be discussed. Students will continue to enhance their skills in report writing, integrating evaluative data while incorporating historical and socio-cultural contextual information, and providing feedback and clinically useful recommendations. A weekly lab is also required. Prerequisite: PSD 7115.
PSD 7107 Biological Bases of Behavior
3
This course offers a practical, clinical, and evidence-based description of the functional anatomy and physiology of the human nervous system. Normal and abnormal development and functioning of the nervous system is presented, including concepts of neuronal physiology and maturation, sleep, arousal and attention, acquiring and retaining information, and various aspects of a person’s ability to act on and adapt to changing environments. Application of this information to clinical practice, research, and personal experience is encouraged. Gender, age, and racial/ethnic differences in physiological processes, as they relate to behavior and experience, are presented in light of new neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological research findings. The ways in which psychological symptoms can arise from physical problems will be discussed to facilitate accurate and comprehensive clinical diagnosis.
PSD 7251 Qualitative Research
2
This is the third course in a three course sequence. It introduces students to specific qualitative methodologies in detail: phenomenology, grounded theory, and qualitative content analysis. Additional forms of qualitative research are also introduced, including consensual qualitative research, qualitative meta-analysis, and case-study designs. The philosophical and methodological issues which underlie qualitative research will be discussed. The course includes lecture, discussion, and practice assignments covering interviewing and qualitative data analysis. Prerequisite: PSD 7250.
Summer - Third Year
Units
PSD 7104 Social & Cultural Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of Social Psychology and other domains of psychological research addressing the nature and influence of culture, with an emphasis on social psychology research and theory relevant to multiculturalism, social justice and professional ethics. The course will also address some key pieces of organizational psychology research which could also be classified as social psychology.
PSD 7108 Cognitive & Affective Bases of Behavior
3
This course provides students with an overview of classical and recent research in the areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, as well as theories of emotion. While the emphasis of the course is on the science of psychology, the relevance of these models to diversity-competent clinical practice is also reviewed.
PSD 7xxx Psychology of Trauma
3
PSD 72xx Dissertation Proposal II
2
This is the second of a three course sequence designed to assist and supervise students in developing their dissertation proposals. Students will continue to expand and refine their Literature Reviews, while drafting the Methods chapter of their dissertation proposals. Students also finalize their dissertation committees this quarter. Prerequisite: PSD 7252.
COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAM II
(Sep)
PSP 5280 Supervised Field Experience
3
Note: This can be done any quarter once it has been confirmed that the student has the pre-reqs to start PSP internship work*
Winter - Fourth Year
Units
IPS III - Integrated Professional Seminar: PSD 7235 Practicum III
3
This is a year-long course, taught in conjunction with PSD 7245. Practicum III gives students credit for their third-year training placement. To receive credit, students must meet the terms of the placement contract, carry the stipulated caseload, and receive a satisfactory evaluation from their clinical supervisor. In class, students are required to demonstrate assessment and integration of clinical data in their clinical work with clients. Students do formal case presentations and prepare for their Clinical Proficiency Exam. Prerequisite: PSD 7135.
PSD 7245 Clinical Communication
1
PSD 7309.x Clinical Topics in Sport Psychology
3
EXPECTED - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
Summer - Fourth Year
Units
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
FINAL DEADLINE - DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
PSP 9091 Comprehensive Oral Examination
0
(When all MA requirements are completed) $75 Fee Comprehensive oral examination covering material in all phases of the program to be taken in the student’s last quarter. Further guidelines are available in the Sport Psychology office.
PSP 9100 Exit Meeting
0
Fall - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
Applied Clinical Theory
3
PSD 7230 Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision
3
Aspects of the supervisory process are presented through the use of theoretical and case materials. Each student has the opportunity to participate as a supervisor in training and have his or her work critiqued. This course also includes information and skills related to supervising organizations, i.e., understanding and managing multiple levels of a system including one’s own private or group clinical practice. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSD 7235 or instructor permission.
INTERNSHIP APPLICATION & INTERVIEW PROCESS
Winter - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
PSD 7215 Foundations of Professional Consultation & Advocacy
3
This course introduces students to the consultative and educational processes and roles in the profession of psychology and their application in working with diverse populations. Students become familiar with the basic stages and processes of consultation and various ways in which professional psychologists provide consultation services. Students are also introduced to the issues and processes of teaching in the field of psychology—including but not limited to administrative duties, course development, and course management. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PETITION TO GRADUATE
(Feb)
INTERNSHIP INTERVIEW PROCESS
Spring - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
FINAL DEADLINE – FINAL DISSERTATION DEFENSE
Fall - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Winter - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Spring - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Commencement & Graduation
If dissertation defended & 36 units of internship completed
Summer - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
4.5*
*If you began internship with 4.5 units. Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Winter - Fifth Year
Units
Clinical Sport Psychology Externship
1 elective credit
PSD 7215 Foundations of Professional Consultation & Advocacy
3
This course introduces students to the consultative and educational processes and roles in the profession of psychology and their application in working with diverse populations. Students become familiar with the basic stages and processes of consultation and various ways in which professional psychologists provide consultation services. Students are also introduced to the issues and processes of teaching in the field of psychology—including but not limited to administrative duties, course development, and course management. Prerequisite: PSD 7016.
PETITION TO GRADUATE
(Feb)
INTERNSHIP INTERVIEW PROCESS
Fall - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Spring - Sixth Year
Units
PSD 7400 Internship
9
Students will apply for approved internship sites anywhere in the country that are consistent with their individual interests, training needs, and professional goals. Students will build competency in the diverse clinical skills required of a professional psychologist. Students are required to complete either one full-time, year-long internship or two-half-time, yearlong internships completed over two years’ time.
Commencement & Graduation
If dissertation defended & 36 units of internship completed

Maybe lasts forever. Yes changes the world.

Faculty

Master of Arts
in Holistic Health Education

19.6%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in CA

14.5%

Expected Annual Growth in Health Education Jobs in U.S. 2014

Ways to Learn

  • Online

Quick Facts

  • 2 Years Full-Time
  • 3 Years Part-Time
  • 59 Units
  • Evening Option

Campus Location

  • Online

Overview

The Master of Arts in Health Education at John F. Kennedy University guides students on an in-depth exploration of health that goes far beyond the disease/cure paradigm currently prevailing in Western medicine. Following an evidence-based approach, students examine the various links among the physical, emotional, spiritual, social, environmental, and systemic aspects of health, investigating the ways in which our individual and communal life experiences are influenced not only by physical factors such as nutrition, exercise, and the environment, but also by thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and relationships.

 

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Highlights

  • Emphasis on client interaction goes beyond the science-only approach of other programs
  • Applied learning component ensures all students gain practical, on-the-job experience while serving the local community
  • Optional specialization in Holistic Nutrition

With a strong focus on experiential learning and an emphasis on multicultural understanding, the program prepares aspiring health educators and holistic nutritionists to work with a wide range of clients across a variety of practice settings. Graduates possess the skills and knowledge necessary to chart their own career in health education, whether it be with a traditional healthcare employer such as a hospital or clinic, with a niche non-profit organization, or as a solo entrepreneur. From day one, our accomplished faculty of scholar-practitioners is dedicated not only to providing our students with the tools they need to guide their clients successfully to increased health and well-being, but to embody the values of holism and wellbeing themselves.

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES
Graduates of the MA in Holistic Health Education degree will, at a level appropriate to a master’s degree, be able to:

  • Demonstrate skills and abilities for the field of holistic health education.
  • Apply specialized knowledge in the field of holistic health education, including holistic perspectives on health, health education, and health coaching.
  • Apply relevant ethical principles or frameworks to guide both professional conduct and relationships with individuals, communities, and other professionals.
  • Cultivate an awareness of a multicultural and diverse community to inform all aspects of the health educator role and to promote health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve the health of all groups.
  • Demonstrate commitment to service to the community.

Change is waiting to happen. You make the call.

Why JFKU

An Integrative Approach to Health

The JFK University MA in Health Education program takes an integrative approach to health that addresses not only the body but also the mind, spirit, community, and environment. Working from an ecological perspective that recognizes the individual’s connection to others and the environment, our trained health educators assist clients in coming to a holistic understanding of health and wellbeing.

Holistic Nutrition Specialization

One of the most popular aspects of our MA in Health Education program is the Holistic Nutrition Specialization. Focusing on food as a healing modality, this specialization meets and exceeds the requirements established by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals (NANP) and is a NANP recommended program. Graduates are eligible to sit for the Board Exam in Holistic Nutrition.

Applied Learning

Prior to completing the program, all students are required to participate in an applied learning component in which they take their knowledge and abilities from the classroom into the community. Under faculty supervision, students fulfill their applied learning component by providing wellness coaching, nutritional consultation, and other health education services.

Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching

Individuals and organizations alike increasingly are turning to the evidence-based field of holistic health coaching to address a glaring need in our current healthcare system. This 14-unit certificate program geared toward preparing students to serve as health and wellness coaches can be embedded directly into the MA in Holistic Health Education program.

Available Specialization

Holistic Nutrition

The MA degree can be completed in 7 quarters if students start in the fall quarter. However, students pursuing the Holistic Nutrition Specialization and/or the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching will need at least one additional quarter to complete the required electives.

Curriculum

The MA in Health Education requires completion of 59 quarter units comprised of the courses outlined below. Each student must also take:

  • HHE 5615, Practicum in Health and Healing, (5) units

Holistic Nutrition Specialization

Most of the courses required for the Holistic Nutrition Specialization are part of the curriculum for the Master’s program, leaving only four (4) units beyond the degree requirements required to fulfill the requirements of the Holistic Nutrition specialization.

Year 1 - Fall
Units
HHE 5701 Introduction to Holistic Health Education
0
A required, no cost, no credit course for all students entering the MA-HHE program, this class prepares students to get the most out of their courses and what they need to do to complete the program. Students will also have an opportunity to consider their values, goals, and objectives at the commencement of their graduate studies.
HHE 5702 Town Hall Meetings
0
Town Hall meetings are held twice a year. Students must attend all town hall meetings while enrolled in the program. Topics discussed will include current issues and developments in the field of health education; program changes and announcements; and student internships and projects. It will also be a forum for students to ask questions and give feedback on the program and to discuss pertinent issues, concerns, and topics.
HHE 5703 Cohort Meetings
0
Students will meet online with an Advisor and their cohorts a minimum of once per quarter while they are enrolled in the program. Students will be assigned to cohorts based on their format and approximate pace of study.
HHE 5710 Foundations of Holistic Health Education
3
This course overviews the field of health education and prepares students for study and practice in their chosen field. We discuss the role of the health educator and various professional and ethical considerations inherent in that role. We look into various holistic theories as tools for analyzing and understanding health and health education. We begin to identify issues and questions of importance to the field and to us personally and professionally, such as health education for the “whole person;” shifting from a disease-focused to a health-focused health paradigm; cultural competency, and spirituality and health.
HHE 5713 Written Communication for Health Education
2
This course is also designed to provide students entering the MA in Holistic Health Education program with a review of the critical thinking and fundamental writing skills that will serve as a foundation for producing graduate-level written work. In addition, students will learn and practice different types of writing that health educators encounter in the field and how to write for different audiences.
HHE 5716 Foundations of Holistic Nutrition
4
This course goes beyond basic nutrition and lays the foundation for using food as medicine focusing on supporting healthy cellular, organ and system function. Reviewing anatomy and physiology through the lens of functional medicine, we also examine the role of macronutrients and micronutrients in health and illness. As a result of the course students will be able to communicate the scientific reason for their nutritional recommendations.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5730 Fundamentals of Coaching
2
In this course, students discover what is needed to develop an effective and trusted coaching relationship that creates meaningful and sustainable change for clients. They learn how to coach from an integral perspective that engages the complexity and potential of the whole person -- mind, body, heart, and spirit. Aligned with the ICF competencies for professional coaches, Fundamentals of Coaching will teach students how to establish the coaching relationship, co-create trust and intimacy, and develop the core coaching skill of deep dialogue. It will also introduce the stages of the coaching process, including how to integrally assess the needs of the client, creating meaningful and clear coaching goals, integral design, and maintaining coaching momentum and accountability. This course will be taught in a dynamic, practice-based approach.
HHE 5732 Health Education Research Basics
2
This course introduces students to research concepts and practices that will support success in their graduate studies in holistic health education. The emphasis will be on developing critical thinking skills and gaining familiarity with academic publications. Key areas of discussion will include how to use the library’s databases to conduct effective literature searches, how to evaluate the quality of a journal and the quality of an article, an efficient strategy for reading articles, the different types of articles, and how to interpret research article results.
HHE 5734 Integrative Health
3
This course provides a foundation in Integrative Health, exploring the development of Western Medicine and alternative and complementary medicine. We examine historical perspectives that influence the current state of healthcare, explore the scientific basis of integrative approaches, and address the challenges of integrative health care. Students evaluate multiple approaches for addressing degenerative diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes examining the relationships among behavioral, environmental and genetic factors that enhance or compromise health.
HHE 5737 Nutrition for Wellness Throughout the Lifecycle A
2
This course introduces the foods, ways of eating and nutritional therapies that help to bring about and maintain the most vibrant health throughout the lifecycle, highlighting pediatric health and geriatric health nutrition. Special dietary needs of children and elders are a focus of this course. Nutritional recommendations for physical and mental vibrancy in the pediatric and elder years are identified through a holistic approach for preventing illness and maintaining wellness. Prerequisite: HHE 5716
Year 1 - Spring
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5750 Coaching Practicum A
1
Students continue to build and deepen their coaching skills through practice and review the coaching competencies. Other key topics include coaching agreements, use of intake questionnaires, self-care for coaches, and considerations for setting up a coaching practice. Prerequisite: HHE 5730
HHE 5753 Research in Health Education
2
This course continues the work begun in HHE 5732 Health Education Research Basics, going deeper with cultivating skills to become sophisticated consumers of health and health education research. Whether working in private practice or as part of an organization, the health educator needs to be prepared to find, understand, and evaluate public health or medical articles written by experts in the field. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be surveyed.
HHE 5756 Multiculturalism & Cultural Competency
2
We discuss our individual, ethical, and professional responsibilities to engage with the challenges of cultural oppression, bias, privilege, and stigma. We examine key issues at the intersection of culture and health, including the social determinants of health and health equity. Students identify the role of the health educator in the formation and evaluation of health policy and embody the role of health activist and advocate. We explore key models of cultural competency in health education, including cultural humility, structural competence, and participatory and community-based approaches. Also covered: the social ecological model of health promotion; community building and community organizing; and Health in All Policies (HiAP).
HHE 5759 Nutrition for Wellness throughout the Lifecycle B
2
This course introduces continues with the coursework from Nutrition for Wellness throughout the Lifecycle A (HHE 5759) highlighting geriatric health and holistic sports nutrition. Special dietary needs of elders and athletes are a focus of this course. Nutritional recommendations for physical and mental vibrancy in the elder years are identified through a holistic approach for preventing illness and maintaining wellness. The nutritional needs of the athlete will also be examined through the lens of holistic nutrition and specific nutritional recommendations for athletes are discussed. Prerequisite: HHE 5737
Year 1 - Summer
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5770 Health, Environment, and Sustainability
2
In this course, we examine the connection between the health of the environment and the health of the individual and community. We look at the origins of humanity’s disconnection from nature and the resulting modern worldview, through which we understand ourselves as separate individuals, “free” but helpless in the face of increasing environmental destruction. We evaluate the consequences of this worldview on our physical, psychological, social, and spiritual health. We then explore possibilities for re-connecting to each other and to the natural world as part of a homecoming that will allow us to re-imagine our relationship to nature and begin to create a sustainable future.
HHE 5772 Challenge of Change
3
This course is designed for future educators, including teachers, trainers, coaches, and others who facilitate learning. We will explore how students can forge their identity as educators from the wisdom of their own lived experience. Topics will include: whole person learning, creating space for learning, adult learning models, learning taxonomies, content organization, presentation skills, experiential activities, learning aids, and learning module lesson plans. Opportunities for in-depth practice will enable students to discover and develop their own style of teaching.
HHE 5774 Professional Development
1
Students will prepare for their internships and for work after graduation. Students will be encouraged to cultivate key skills such as informational interviewing and “selling” their ideas through oral and written communication. Students will learn how to identify and obtain an internship as a model for obtaining work throughout their careers.
HHE 5777 Complementary and Alternative Modalities
2
A general survey of holistic health practices and issues, with a focus on the variety of alternative and complementary modalities that are present in integrative health care settings. Students will complete an assessment of the values and attitudes which underpin their current health practices, as well as examining the values and issues that shape our current health care models. They will explore and critically evaluate a variety of holistic health services and their application.
HHE 5801 Student Review: Mid-Point
0
A comprehensive review of the student’s work halfway through the program. Each student’s work is reviewed by the department chair. All degree candidates must meet with the department chair in order to continue in the program.
Year 2 - Fall
Units
HHE 5820 Concepts and Practices for the Emerging Educator
3
This course is designed to help future educators, including teachers, trainers, coaches, and others who facilitate learning develop familiarity with a range of learning models and instructional methods. Topics will include: whole person learning, creating space for learning, adult learning models, learning taxonomies, content organization, presentation skills, experiential activities, writing learning outcomes, and how to create a learning module. Opportunities for practice will enable students to apply course content immediately.
HHE 5823 Psychology and Physiology of Stress
2
In this course, we examine the psychological and physiological effects of stress on the mind and body. Content will include information on the impact of stress on the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, digestive and immune systems, among others.
HHE 5825 Internship
1-2
Students work with ways of bridging their work as students with what they hope to do as professionals by working for one quarter in a professional setting under the guidance of a mentor, keeping a journal, and describing their work in a paper. This internship meets the requirements of SVL 5000 – Service Learning. This two-unit requirement may be satisfied with two separate internships of 1 unit each; one 2-unit internship in a single quarter, or a 1-unit internship over two quarters. Prerequisite: HHE 5774 and Permission of Instructor.
Electives
0-2
Students take a minimum of 5 elective units. They may choose from among electives offered for the Holistic Nutrition Specialization, and/or for the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching, and/or other topics such as Energy Models of Healing, Arts in Healthcare, or Transitions & Grief.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5840 Innovative Strategies for Health Education
2
Students explore creative and novel ways to approach complex health education problems using collaborative processes that emerge from the fields of design thinking, iterative design, and media production. Students will also hone their ability to communicate complex ideas and solutions in a variety of internal and external settings.
HHE 5842 Mind-Body Practices for Self-Care
2
The theory, concepts and practice of various mind-body medicine modalities (such as meditation, expressive movement, visualization, etc.) will be presented as comprehensive holistic approach to stress management. Students will learn hands-on practices for mind-body self-care and will integrate their learning into course content.
HHE 5865 Capstone A
2
This is the first course of a two-course series in which the student will develop and create a health education capstone project, which consists of a written paper and an oral presentation. The student considers an important question or challenge in the field of health education and develops a holistic or integrative solution in the shape of a new model, approach, program, curriculum, etc. (approach or program) through faculty guidance and peer support/feedback. In the first course, the student develops the approach or program and writes a detailed description of it and its possible method of implementation. Prerequisites: Permission of Chair
HHE 5825 Internship
1-2
Students work with ways of bridging their work as students with what they hope to do as professionals by working for one quarter in a professional setting under the guidance of a mentor, keeping a journal, and describing their work in a paper. This internship meets the requirements of SVL 5000 – Service Learning. This two-unit requirement may be satisfied with two separate internships of 1 unit each; one 2-unit internship in a single quarter, or a 1-unit internship over two quarters. Prerequisite: HHE 5774 and Permission of Instructor.
Electives
0-2+
Students take a minimum of 5 elective units. They may choose from among electives offered for the Holistic Nutrition Specialization, and/or for the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching, and/or other topics such as Energy Models of Healing, Arts in Healthcare, or Transitions & Grief.
Year 2 - Spring
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5855 Coaching for Health and Wellbeing
1
The focus of this advanced level course is coaching individuals for health and wellbeing. Students consider different coaching models and tools, such as salutogenesis, narrative, and appreciative inquiry, that are well suited to promoting the client’s wellbeing. Students explore the importance of alignment between a client’s health values and beliefs and their coaching goals. The practice of creating “wellness visions” and the like is examined. We also identify barriers to coaching for health and wellbeing and how to overcome them. Corequisite: HHE 5750
HHE 5866 Capstone B
2
This is the second course of a two-course series in which the student will develop and create a health education capstone project, which consists of a written paper and an oral presentation. In this course the student presents a public oral presentation providing an explanation of the theoretical foundations of the proposed approach or program and identifying similarities and differences between theirs and existing approaches or programs. Prerequisite: HHE 5865
Electives
0-2+
Students take a minimum of 5 elective units. They may choose from among electives offered for the Holistic Nutrition Specialization, and/or for the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching, and/or other topics such as Energy Models of Healing, Arts in Healthcare, or Transitions & Grief.
Year 1 - Winter
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5730 Fundamentals of Coaching
2
In this course, students discover what is needed to develop an effective and trusted coaching relationship that creates meaningful and sustainable change for clients. They learn how to coach from an integral perspective that engages the complexity and potential of the whole person -- mind, body, heart, and spirit. Aligned with the ICF competencies for professional coaches, Fundamentals of Coaching will teach students how to establish the coaching relationship, co-create trust and intimacy, and develop the core coaching skill of deep dialogue. It will also introduce the stages of the coaching process, including how to integrally assess the needs of the client, creating meaningful and clear coaching goals, integral design, and maintaining coaching momentum and accountability. This course will be taught in a dynamic, practice-based approach.
HHE 5732 Health Education Research Basics
2
This course introduces students to research concepts and practices that will support success in their graduate studies in holistic health education. The emphasis will be on developing critical thinking skills and gaining familiarity with academic publications. Key areas of discussion will include how to use the library’s databases to conduct effective literature searches, how to evaluate the quality of a journal and the quality of an article, an efficient strategy for reading articles, the different types of articles, and how to interpret research article results.
HHE 5734 Integrative Health
3
This course provides a foundation in Integrative Health, exploring the development of Western Medicine and alternative and complementary medicine. We examine historical perspectives that influence the current state of healthcare, explore the scientific basis of integrative approaches, and address the challenges of integrative health care. Students evaluate multiple approaches for addressing degenerative diseases, cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes examining the relationships among behavioral, environmental and genetic factors that enhance or compromise health.
HHE 5737 Nutrition for Wellness Throughout the Lifecycle A
2
This course introduces the foods, ways of eating and nutritional therapies that help to bring about and maintain the most vibrant health throughout the lifecycle, highlighting pediatric health and geriatric health nutrition. Special dietary needs of children and elders are a focus of this course. Nutritional recommendations for physical and mental vibrancy in the pediatric and elder years are identified through a holistic approach for preventing illness and maintaining wellness. Prerequisite: HHE 5716
Year 1 - Summer
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5770 Health, Environment, and Sustainability
2
In this course, we examine the connection between the health of the environment and the health of the individual and community. We look at the origins of humanity’s disconnection from nature and the resulting modern worldview, through which we understand ourselves as separate individuals, “free” but helpless in the face of increasing environmental destruction. We evaluate the consequences of this worldview on our physical, psychological, social, and spiritual health. We then explore possibilities for re-connecting to each other and to the natural world as part of a homecoming that will allow us to re-imagine our relationship to nature and begin to create a sustainable future.
HHE 5772 Challenge of Change
3
This course is designed for future educators, including teachers, trainers, coaches, and others who facilitate learning. We will explore how students can forge their identity as educators from the wisdom of their own lived experience. Topics will include: whole person learning, creating space for learning, adult learning models, learning taxonomies, content organization, presentation skills, experiential activities, learning aids, and learning module lesson plans. Opportunities for in-depth practice will enable students to discover and develop their own style of teaching.
HHE 5774 Professional Development
1
Students will prepare for their internships and for work after graduation. Students will be encouraged to cultivate key skills such as informational interviewing and “selling” their ideas through oral and written communication. Students will learn how to identify and obtain an internship as a model for obtaining work throughout their careers.
HHE 5777 Complementary and Alternative Modalities
2
A general survey of holistic health practices and issues, with a focus on the variety of alternative and complementary modalities that are present in integrative health care settings. Students will complete an assessment of the values and attitudes which underpin their current health practices, as well as examining the values and issues that shape our current health care models. They will explore and critically evaluate a variety of holistic health services and their application.
HHE 5801 Student Review: Mid-Point
0
A comprehensive review of the student’s work halfway through the program. Each student’s work is reviewed by the department chair. All degree candidates must meet with the department chair in order to continue in the program.
Year 2 - Winter
Units
HHE 5870 Colloquium in Holistic Health Education
1
The Colloquia represent our residency requirement, offered three times a year, often held over a single weekend. Students from both the online and hybrid formats attend together, with program faculty welcome to attend as well. Topics covered will include those of general interest to all, such as professional identity or spirituality and health, as well as cutting edge issues as they arise. Each Colloquium is 1 unit each. Students are required to attend a minimum of five Colloquia in order to graduate.
HHE 5840 Innovative Strategies for Health Education
2
Students explore creative and novel ways to approach complex health education problems using collaborative processes that emerge from the fields of design thinking, iterative design, and media production. Students will also hone their ability to communicate complex ideas and solutions in a variety of internal and external settings.
HHE 5842 Mind-Body Practices for Self-Care
2
The theory, concepts and practice of various mind-body medicine modalities (such as meditation, expressive movement, visualization, etc.) will be presented as comprehensive holistic approach to stress management. Students will learn hands-on practices for mind-body self-care and will integrate their learning into course content.
HHE 5865 Capstone A
2
This is the first course of a two-course series in which the student will develop and create a health education capstone project, which consists of a written paper and an oral presentation. The student considers an important question or challenge in the field of health education and develops a holistic or integrative solution in the shape of a new model, approach, program, curriculum, etc. (approach or program) through faculty guidance and peer support/feedback. In the first course, the student develops the approach or program and writes a detailed description of it and its possible method of implementation. Prerequisites: Permission of Chair
HHE 5825 Internship
1-2
Students work with ways of bridging their work as students with what they hope to do as professionals by working for one quarter in a professional setting under the guidance of a mentor, keeping a journal, and describing their work in a paper. This internship meets the requirements of SVL 5000 – Service Learning. This two-unit requirement may be satisfied with two separate internships of 1 unit each; one 2-unit internship in a single quarter, or a 1-unit internship over two quarters. Prerequisite: HHE 5774 and Permission of Instructor.
Electives
0-2+
Students take a minimum of 5 elective units. They may choose from among electives offered for the Holistic Nutrition Specialization, and/or for the Graduate Certificate in Holistic Health Coaching, and/or other topics such as Energy Models of Healing, Arts in Healthcare, or Transitions & Grief.

If you’re here, you’ve already begun.

Master of Arts in Consciousness and Transformative Studies

1

First Accredited Consciousness MA in the United States

40+

Year Old Program

88%

Student Satisfaction Rate

74%

Program Alumni with Right Livelihood

Ways to Learn

  • Online
  • Hybrid
  • In-Person

Program Length

  • 2 Years Full-Time
  • 3 Years Part-Time
  • 58 Units

Overview

Delve deeper into your own consciousness and gain the knowledge to help transform self and world with a Master of Arts in Consciousness and Transformative Studies.

Drawing from psychology, philosophy, religion, and the new sciences, consciousness studies bridges the divide between science and spirituality to empower transformative leaders. Leading students on a journey of self-discovery, the MA in Consciousness and Transformative Studies program links personal transformation to professional development and service of the greater good. The program is designed not only to galvanize your wisdom, courage, love, joy, and vitality, but also to enrich your sense of meaning, passion, and purpose. This program is offered on campus and online in a structured format with weekly deadlines across each quarter-long course.

Read More

Highlights

  • Attain greater self-knowledge and growth through a multidisciplinary approach drawing from psychology, philosophy, and religion
  • Clarify your life purpose and develop professional expertise
  • Gain creative competencies applicable to a wide range of fields

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students earning a Master’s in Consciousness and Transformative Studies will be able to do the following:

  • Articulate and apply a holistic and developmental view of consciousness and human evolution.
  • Demonstrate awareness and accountability for one’s subjective states and stage development using integrative psychological and spiritual principles and practices.
  • Communicate and apply systems theory principles to individual, community, and organizational transformation.
  • Apply leadership and Participatory Action Research skills to a creative leadership project in service of consciousness growth and systems change.

Sound like you? Make it real.

Why JFKU

Turn Your Degree into Your Work

Acknowledging that the journey of identifying our authentic purpose would not be complete without the practical skills necessary to make that vision a reality, our program devotes a portion of required coursework to professional development topics such as writing, teaching, publishing, entrepreneurship, and coaching. These practical skills aid students in translating their degree into a professional context.

Customize Your Expertise

Graduates of the Program go on to work in a range of fields where their new skills allow them to effectively guide individuals, organizations, and even entire communities through transformational change. Depending on their objectives, students may choose from a variety of specializations:

  • Consciousness and Healing
  • Culture and Community
  • Philosophy and Religion
  • Dream Studies
  • Coaching (Coming soon!)

Come Home to a Program that Recognizes Your Experience

In existence since the late 1970s, our program was one of the first of its kind in the country. We were built on the understanding that there are those of us out there whose experience is not yet recognized by the culture at large. In joining us, many of our students feel that they have found their tribe. By discovering a shared recognition of their unique experience, they also come home to themselves.

Curriculum

The Master’s in Consciousness and Transformative Studies requires completion of 58 quarter units. Specializations are completed within the 58 units through completion of four “core” courses and 6-7 elective units, all of which are part of the degree requirements.

Undergraduate Prerequisites [1]
COR 3145 – Research Writing (4 units)

Fall - First Year
Units
CNS 5049 Intro to Consciousness Studies
0 (All New Students)
This course introduces new students to the Consciousness and Transformative Studies program.
CNS 5012 Emotional Intelligence
3
This course introduces basic principles and practices of effective communication. Since emotional intelligence is a cornerstone of effective communication, students learn about affect theory and emotional scripts, and learn to apply these theories personally in service of greater self-awareness. Topics include emotional intelligence, affect theory, emotional scripts, emotional triggering and reactivity, presence, centering, listening skills, and discriminating between content and process.
CNS 5015 Body Consciousness/ Body Wisdom
2
This experiential course gives students the opportunity to explore their own body sensations, and in so doing, to make contact with its wisdom and power. We explore various areas and systems of the body, listening to their messages about what makes us feel supported, trusting, and strong; what makes us feel alive and passionate; what is right for us; what makes us feel satisfied; what do we care for and what do we want to give; what are our boundaries and what do we want to express; and what makes us feel protected and safe. Along the way, we consider messages that signal stress, anxiety, hunger, fear, and vulnerability.
Winter - First Year
Units
CNS 5030 Consciousness of Sleep and Dreams
2
Students will examine recent scientific research in sleep and dreams and explore varieties of techniques in working with dreams. The course focuses on the states of consciousness within sleep and different phenomena of the dreaming mind. Students will also explore their own dreams through different experiential and creative explorations.
CNS 5013 Interpersonal Intelligence
3
(prereq: CNS 5012 Emotional) This course continues to practice skills and principles of effective communication with a focus on intersubjective contexts. Students explore the use of communication in day-to-day life, relationships, counseling, teaching, employment settings, and other contexts. Topics include emotional dynamics, conflict resolution, and the importance of communication in social and global issues.
Spring - First Year
Units
CNS 5010 Paradigms of Consciousness
3
A paradigm is a model of reality, or aspects of reality, held by a community, and affirmed and enacted through communal behavior. Society today is shaped by past paradigms of consciousness as well as those which are newly emerging. This class explores the nature of paradigms, how they emerge, and how they are sustained and changed. We give particular attention to the evolution of various paradigms of consciousness and reality – from indigenous to modern, postmodern, holistic, and integral – and examine the potential of each to contribute to personal, social, and global transformation.
CNS 5125 Transpersonal Psychology
3
Summer - First Year
Units
CNS 5349 Integral Life Spiritual Practice
2
The complex challenges of our time demand that we give the best of ourselves to the world, yet many of these challenges leave us with little time for self-care or self-cultivation. An integral life practice, which draws on both ancient and modern insights and techniques as well as the principles of cross-training to maximize the effectiveness of our efforts, offers a stream-lined approach to transformative practice and thriving. Through this course, students engage in individual and collective self-assessment exercises, and learn to design and implement an integrative program of practices to promote physical health, emotional balance, mental clarity, and spiritual awakening.
CNS 5275 Living Systems & Creative Potential
2
This course introduces the basic principles of Living Systems Theory using theoretical and experiential components. Students apply these principles and practices to a selected area of interest (ecology, psychological development, community/cultural development, education, business or spiritual leadership, etc). We also explore feedback processes, the interdependence of all life, creative emergence, individual development, family systems and the impact of systems thinking on organizational transformation and social change.
Fall - Second Year
Units
CNS 5017 Human Development and Evolution of Consciousness
2
This course imparts a meta-perspective on human development and on the evolution of human consciousness. Developmental models assist us in perceiving the growth potentials across the human life span, which include conscious leadership. The course introduces various models of human development, such as Erikson’s psychosocial development, Kohlberg and Gilligan’s moral development, Fowler’s faith development and Kegan’s adult development. The course also explores basic elements of Ken Wilber’s integral theory, including the four quadrants, the difference between states and stages, and premodern, modern, and postmodern altitudes. Topics include models of consciousness, the relationship of Self/self, and the potential of integral psychology to deepen our understanding of and help bring about personal psycho-spiritual development as well as social/global change.
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
3
Winter - Second Year
Units
CNS 5023 Shamanic Traditions
2
Shamanic practices and rituals that acknowledge and strengthen relationship to family, community, and the earth are sorely lacking in our modern culture, yet with each person’s ancestral lineages can be found evidence of earth-based spirituality, nurtured and supported through shamanic traditions. In this class, students will research shamanic practices within their ancestral lineages with the intention of integrating these practices with present-day knowledge.
CNS 5120 Diversity, Community & Leadership
3
(prereq: CNS 5013 Interpersonal) This course explores the question: Who am I, who are we, and who do we want to be as leaders of a new paradigm of interrelationship, interconnection, compassion and global citizenship? Students explore diversity, community development, leadership skills and professional development possibilities for expressing their highest and deepest values as agents of transformative change in their personal lives, families, and communities.
Spring - Second Year
Units
CNS 5025 Cosmology & Consciousness
3
(Prerequisite: CNS 5010 Paradigms). Cosmology is the study of the origin, structure, evolution, and eventual fate of the universe. Perhaps the most mysterious and intriguing aspect of the universe is the fact that it has evolved to include living beings with experience and even self-consciousness. Using the principles of systems theory, we can view the evolution and development of human consciousness not as separate from the rest of the cosmos, as is usually thought, but as integral parts of the experiential expansion of the cosmos. In this view, experience is as fundamental a feature of the universe as is space, time, energy, and matter. This participatory cosmology asks us all to become aware of our subjective states as causal elements in the continuing unfolding of the cosmos.
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
2
Summer - Second Year
Units
CNS 5455 Professional Identity: Life Purpose
3
This course presents the Enneagram system through the lens of professional identity (e.g. as team members, leaders, entrepreneurs). The Enneagram is a spiritual and psychological personality system comprised of 9 interrelated personality types with distinct unconscious emotional motivations that drive behavior and are expressed in 9 unique styles of speaking, communicating, body language and world view. The course examines the Enneagram Centers, Wings and Levels of Development, to identify differences between people of the same Type and levels of constriction (i.e. healthy to unhealthy). Throughout the course, students are expected to create and maintain a developmental practice designed to bring awareness to subjective reactions and perceptions and improve self-awareness, self-management and personal accountability.
CNS 5020 Archetypal Mythology
3
(Prerequisite: CNS 5125 Transpersonal). This course explores the role, weight, and significance of life's mythic dimension from the standpoint of depth psychologists who have claimed that mythic presences, events, and situations are not dead or extinct, but alive and addressing us continually. Archetypes and myths address us every day in our dreams, relationships, conflicts, and mishaps. We explore this claim through discussions, dream work, film, and other media that disclose deep myth-making layers of the psyche. Understanding the archetypal layer of consciousness deepens awareness of our subjectivity, and restores to us the archaic roots of our evolutionary heritage.
CNS 5126 Qualitative Research A
1
This course provides students with an introduction to research paradigms, and an overview of qualitative research methodologies. Discussion and exercises in class are geared toward defining and developing a research topic, question and project, in preparation for designing and conducting a creative leadership project.
Winter - First Year
Units
CNS 5030 Consciousness of Sleep and Dreams
2
Students will examine recent scientific research in sleep and dreams and explore varieties of techniques in working with dreams. The course focuses on the states of consciousness within sleep and different phenomena of the dreaming mind. Students will also explore their own dreams through different experiential and creative explorations.
CNS 5013 Interpersonal Intelligence
3
(prereq: CNS 5012 Emotional) This course continues to practice skills and principles of effective communication with a focus on intersubjective contexts. Students explore the use of communication in day-to-day life, relationships, counseling, teaching, employment settings, and other contexts. Topics include emotional dynamics, conflict resolution, and the importance of communication in social and global issues.
Summer - First Year
Units
CNS 5349 Integral Life Spiritual Practice
2
The complex challenges of our time demand that we give the best of ourselves to the world, yet many of these challenges leave us with little time for self-care or self-cultivation. An integral life practice, which draws on both ancient and modern insights and techniques as well as the principles of cross-training to maximize the effectiveness of our efforts, offers a stream-lined approach to transformative practice and thriving. Through this course, students engage in individual and collective self-assessment exercises, and learn to design and implement an integrative program of practices to promote physical health, emotional balance, mental clarity, and spiritual awakening.
CNS 5275 Living Systems & Creative Potential
2
This course introduces the basic principles of Living Systems Theory using theoretical and experiential components. Students apply these principles and practices to a selected area of interest (ecology, psychological development, community/cultural development, education, business or spiritual leadership, etc). We also explore feedback processes, the interdependence of all life, creative emergence, individual development, family systems and the impact of systems thinking on organizational transformation and social change.
Winter - Second Year
Units
CNS 5023 Shamanic Traditions
2
Shamanic practices and rituals that acknowledge and strengthen relationship to family, community, and the earth are sorely lacking in our modern culture, yet with each person’s ancestral lineages can be found evidence of earth-based spirituality, nurtured and supported through shamanic traditions. In this class, students will research shamanic practices within their ancestral lineages with the intention of integrating these practices with present-day knowledge.
CNS 5120 Diversity, Community & Leadership
3
(prereq: CNS 5013 Interpersonal) This course explores the question: Who am I, who are we, and who do we want to be as leaders of a new paradigm of interrelationship, interconnection, compassion and global citizenship? Students explore diversity, community development, leadership skills and professional development possibilities for expressing their highest and deepest values as agents of transformative change in their personal lives, families, and communities.
Summer - Second Year
Units
CNS 5455 Professional Identity: Life Purpose
3
This course presents the Enneagram system through the lens of professional identity (e.g. as team members, leaders, entrepreneurs). The Enneagram is a spiritual and psychological personality system comprised of 9 interrelated personality types with distinct unconscious emotional motivations that drive behavior and are expressed in 9 unique styles of speaking, communicating, body language and world view. The course examines the Enneagram Centers, Wings and Levels of Development, to identify differences between people of the same Type and levels of constriction (i.e. healthy to unhealthy). Throughout the course, students are expected to create and maintain a developmental practice designed to bring awareness to subjective reactions and perceptions and improve self-awareness, self-management and personal accountability.
CNS 5020 Archetypal Mythology
3
(Prerequisite: CNS 5125 Transpersonal). This course explores the role, weight, and significance of life's mythic dimension from the standpoint of depth psychologists who have claimed that mythic presences, events, and situations are not dead or extinct, but alive and addressing us continually. Archetypes and myths address us every day in our dreams, relationships, conflicts, and mishaps. We explore this claim through discussions, dream work, film, and other media that disclose deep myth-making layers of the psyche. Understanding the archetypal layer of consciousness deepens awareness of our subjectivity, and restores to us the archaic roots of our evolutionary heritage.
CNS 5126 Qualitative Research A
1
This course provides students with an introduction to research paradigms, and an overview of qualitative research methodologies. Discussion and exercises in class are geared toward defining and developing a research topic, question and project, in preparation for designing and conducting a creative leadership project.

Faculty

Fall - Third Year
Units
CNS 5127 Qualitative Research B (OR)
1
(prereq: CNS 5126 Qualitative Research A) Continuing the approach of CNS 5126, this course provides students with an in-depth exposure to participatory action research methods. Students apply one of these methods to their own creative leadership project by creating a research design using Action Research, Collaborative Inquiry or Appreciative Inquiry. They also complete a literature review focused on their topic and project.
CNS 5600 Planning a Thesis
1
(prereq: CNS 5126 Qualitative Research A) In this course, students will explore their thesis topics and clarify the major questions to be addressed.
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
4
Winter - Third Year
Units
CNS 5610 MA Integrative Project A (OR)
1
(prereq: CNS 5127 Qualitative Research B) Students implement participatory action research methods in service of consciousness growth and systems change. Students conduct research for their creative leadership project designed in CNS 5127. Projects typically engage in four cycles of action and reflection, plus a final meaning-making meeting.
CNS 5602 Thesis
1
(prereq: CNS 5600 Planning a Thesis)
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
4
Spring - Third Year
Units
CNS 5611 MA Integrative Project B (OR)
1
In this class, students assimilate the learnings from their creative leadership project conducted in service of consciousness growth and systems change. They prepare their final integrative paper, reporting on their learnings from their creative leadership project conducted in CNS 5610. They also present their project and learnings in class. The creative leadership project offers a bridge to post-graduation work and right livelihood.
CNS 5602 Thesis
1
(prereq: CNS 5600 Planning a Thesis)
CNS 5613 Consciousness Studies Integration
1
This course, taken at the conclusion of the program, offers students the opportunity to integrate their cumulative learnings from the Consciousness and Transformative Studies curriculum, both personally and conceptually. The course includes a review of key concepts and major principles from the core curriculum, gathered through student presentations and then evaluated through a cumulative learning assessment. Additionally, students apply these concepts and principles in a personal essay exploring their own transformation of consciousness throughout the program.
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
4
Summer - Third Year
Units
CNS 5602 Thesis
1
Winter - Third Year
Units
CNS 5610 MA Integrative Project A (OR)
1
(prereq: CNS 5127 Qualitative Research B) Students implement participatory action research methods in service of consciousness growth and systems change. Students conduct research for their creative leadership project designed in CNS 5127. Projects typically engage in four cycles of action and reflection, plus a final meaning-making meeting.
CNS 5602 Thesis
1
(prereq: CNS 5600 Planning a Thesis)
ELECTIVES OR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
4
Summer - Third Year
Units
CNS 5602 Thesis
1

You found the door. So open it.

Paralegal Certificate

100%

Textbooks Included in Tuition

30%+

Graduates Move on to Law School After Graduation

100%

Faculty are Practicing Attorneys

82%

Grads Working in the Legal Field within a Month Post-Grad

Ways to Learn

  • Hybrid
  • In-Person

Quick Facts

  • 1 Year Full-Time
  • 6 Quarters Part-Time
  • 39 Units
  • Evening Classes

Overview

Now as much as ever, our communities are in dire need of socially conscious law practitioners able and willing to defend the rights of the underserved and to represent the interests of the marginalized on issues of vital importance.

JFK University’s American-Bar-Association-approved Paralegal Certificate Program gives you the chance to play a key role in the fast-paced, high-stakes, and hugely impactful legal profession.

In as little as one year, you could be making a difference working in a professional legal environment as a highly valued and respected team member.

Note: Paralegals cannot provide legal advice except as directed by an attorney nor can they establish a client/business relationship or represent a client.

Read More

Highlights

  • Approved by the American Bar Association (ABA)
  • Embedded into a Bachelor of Arts in Legal Studies completion degree
  • Faculty members that are also successful practitioners in the field
  • A full law school and law library at your fingertips
  • Internship opportunities that pave the way toward your career

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students completing the Paralegal Certificate will be able to do the following:

Demonstrate proficiency in legal writing and analysis.

Describe and assess the ethical obligations and limitations of legal professionals in specific factual situations.

Demonstrate proficiency in legal research, both online and in the library.

Demonstrate proficiency in drafting of discovery.

Apply analytical and creative thinking skills.

Watch what happens when you say yes.

Why JFKU

Experienced Faculty Members who Practice what they Teach

Unlike many other paralegal certificate programs, JFK University offers courses taught by practicing attorneys who possess vast experience in the subject areas they teach. These faculty practitioners expose students to a broad array of perspectives, while giving them the benefit of specialized knowledge that comes only with years of work in the field.  

Internships that Offer Real-World Experience

Our ABA-approved Paralegal Certificate Program offers optional internship opportunities at local law firms, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations. By supplementing their classroom education with on-the-job learning and networking, students who take advantage of these internships leave our program with an edge on the job-seeking competition.

A Full Law School at Your Fingertips

Unlike other paralegal studies programs, our students have the resources of a full law school at their disposal. Complete access to the law library, invites to on-campus events, and abundant networking opportunities await. Students also have the opportunity to collaborate with JD candidates on real public-interest legal cases in the College’s highly regarded community law clinics.

Curriculum

REQUIREMENTS

All certificate courses must be taken in residence – no transfers are accepted.

The 39-quarter unit curriculum includes 12 legal specialty courses, of which nine are required courses and two are elective.

Fall
Units
PLS 3001 Introduction to Law
4
This course provides students with an overview of the American legal system and introduces students to various legal fields and topics. Legal vocabulary and legal writing will be emphasized. This course will also provide an overview of the role of paralegals in a work environment while concentrating on the various regulations and ethical guidelines governing the work of paralegals.
PLS3005 Tort Law
4
This course will introduce the student to the broad area of civil tort law including negligence, intentional torts, strict liability, product liability, and nuisance. Privileges and defenses to various torts will also be introduced. Students will acquire the knowledge to define and evaluate tort law to specific factual situations.
PLS3004 Legal Ethics
2
This course provides an overview of the legal ethics facing paralegals today. This course will extensively cover the ethical rules governing paralegals developed by the American Bar Association in conjunction with the various local and state regulations pertaining to the professional work of paralegals. Emphasis will be placed on the evaluation of real-life ethical dilemmas encountered by paralegals in the workforce.
Winter
Units
PLS 3002 Legal Research
4
This course provides an introduction to legal research. It is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of research materials and tools including giving the student a working knowledge of the use of primary and secondary sources with emphasis on research strategies. Students will learn how to locate sources of law, the use of proper citation method, how to Shepardize case law, and research codes and statutes. This course will also focus heavily on the use of computer-assisted legal research.
PLS 3003 Legal Writing
4
This course is the advanced writing course, reinforcing the art of analyzing legal problems, writing clear and concise legal memoranda and briefs. This course will emphasize the writing component of the paralegal profession by requiring the student to research various legal problems and communicate their findings in their proper written format.
Legal Specialty Focus Course
4
Spring
Units
PLS 3008 Litigation I
4
This course is designed to introduce the student to civil litigation in federal and state courts. The rules of civil procedure will be the focus, with emphasis in the drafting of complaints, answers, and motion practice. Students will be responsible for the drafting of numerous legal documents by way of practical exercises. Additionally, this course will provide students with various interviewing and investigating skills relevant to paralegal work in a law office setting.
Legal Specialty Focus Course or Internship
4
Summer
Units
PLS 3010 Legal Technology Applications and Management
4
This course is designed to introduce students to various types of technology often used in legal environments. The student will interact directly with the technology throughout the course. The student will be exposed to the management of a law office, including software utilized by firms.
PLS 3009 Litigation II
4
This course covers evidence, discovery, trial preparation, trial practice, appeals, and non-judgment matters. Students will continue building expertise in drafting legal documents and will develop skills in organizing documents and preparing for trial including the use of technology.
PLS 3011 Paralegal Capstone
1
This is the capstone course for the Paralegal Certificate Program. Students will use their skills and knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum to interview clients, prepare pleadings and discovery, and perform legal analysis through the drafting of legal memoranda.
Winter
Units
PLS 3002 Legal Research
4
This course provides an introduction to legal research. It is designed to provide the student with a comprehensive knowledge of research materials and tools including giving the student a working knowledge of the use of primary and secondary sources with emphasis on research strategies. Students will learn how to locate sources of law, the use of proper citation method, how to Shepardize case law, and research codes and statutes. This course will also focus heavily on the use of computer-assisted legal research.
PLS 3003 Legal Writing
4
This course is the advanced writing course, reinforcing the art of analyzing legal problems, writing clear and concise legal memoranda and briefs. This course will emphasize the writing component of the paralegal profession by requiring the student to research various legal problems and communicate their findings in their proper written format.
Legal Specialty Focus Course
4
Summer
Units
PLS 3010 Legal Technology Applications and Management
4
This course is designed to introduce students to various types of technology often used in legal environments. The student will interact directly with the technology throughout the course. The student will be exposed to the management of a law office, including software utilized by firms.
PLS 3009 Litigation II
4
This course covers evidence, discovery, trial preparation, trial practice, appeals, and non-judgment matters. Students will continue building expertise in drafting legal documents and will develop skills in organizing documents and preparing for trial including the use of technology.
PLS 3011 Paralegal Capstone
1
This is the capstone course for the Paralegal Certificate Program. Students will use their skills and knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum to interview clients, prepare pleadings and discovery, and perform legal analysis through the drafting of legal memoranda.

Faculty

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