Ways to Learn

  • In-Person
  • Hybrid

Quick Facts

  • 2.5 Years/ 10 Quarters
  • Part-Time Option
  • 90 Units
  • Morning & Evening Options

Overview

“Follow your passion,” the old saying goes. But what about compassion? With a license-eligible Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology from John F. Kennedy University, you’ll gain the knowledge and skills necessary to transform your affinity for helping others into a career in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT).

Marriage and Family Therapists work with clients of all ages and life circumstances, from children to seniors, guiding them through life’s many challenges. JFK University’s MA in Counseling Psychology prepares graduates to attain their full potential as practitioners by focusing on the development of clinical skills through extensive practical experience. Our expanded focus on clinical skills, assessment, and diagnosis make JFK University graduates some of the most highly sought-after Marriage and Family Therapists in the competitive Bay Area job market.

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Highlights

  • Satisfy California Board of Behavioral Sciences Requirements and gain exam preparation with this license-eligible degree
  • Attune yourself to issues of multiculturalism and social justice
  • Learn from a faculty of practitioner-scholar experts

PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students completing the Master’s in Counseling Psychology will be able to do the following:

Articulate and evaluate the role of the self in marriage and family therapy and in professional clinical counseling along with developing strong professional identities as therapists and counselors and demonstrating leadership and advocacy applicable to furthering the professions.

Assess and diagnose client problems systematically and contextually.

Establish, maintain, evaluate, and utilize the therapeutic relationship to serve the mental health needs of diverse clients.

Recognize their own potential biases and deliver culturally sensitive treatment.

Utilize concepts, structures, theories, models, and technologies appropriate to the practice of marriage and family therapy and professional clinical counseling.

Identify, explain, and apply state, federal, and local laws that govern the provision of psychotherapy and counseling and can employ ethical decision-making processes.

Be aware of, evaluate, and respond to measurable outcomes of their work with clients using the research tools and methods in the field and employing evidence-based practices in psychotherapy and counseling interventions, assessments, and program evaluations.

Set something in motion with a simple yes.

Why JFKU

A Modern, Multifaceted Degree in Counseling Psychology

JFK University’s master’s degree program in Counseling Psychology provides a robust contemporary education in the counseling arts and the practice of psychotherapy, integrating recent findings in fields such as trauma research, developmental attachment, systems theory, and neurobiology (including interpersonal neurobiology) with a grounding in evidence-based practices and psychotherapy.

Practitioner-Scholars Who Practice What They Teach

Our faculty members collectively have published dozens of articles, books, and studies, and they have travelled the country giving talks on their respective areas of expertise. Their diversity of backgrounds and viewpoints exposes our students to the full breadth of clinical psychology and allows them to make informed decisions about which theoretical approaches and practice areas suit them best.

An Emphasis on Clinical Practice

Our program graduates stand apart from the competition thanks to the volume of practical experience and clinical skills training they receive. Whereas most programs require only one quarter of clinical skills training, JFK University requires three. And the JFK University MA in Clinical Psychology offers up to twice as many courses dedicated to assessment and diagnosis as other programs.

Accelerated Degree Program

The MA in Counseling Psychology is also offered in an accelerated format, which allows students to complete the program in 2 years instead of 2 and a half. Classes are held on Thursday evenings and all day Saturday on the Pleasant Hill campus, making this track an accessible option for students who are also holding down a full-time job.

Curriculum

To receive the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology degree, students must complete 90 units.

Fall - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5115 Theories for MFT Practice I
3
This course serves as the beginning of a survey of historical and empirical foundations of therapeutic theories and their effectiveness. Individually-oriented and family systems epistemologies are compared in their historical contexts. Theories I covers psychodynamically-based approaches with individuals, couples, and families. The course also introduces communication theory, cybernetics, and early systems approaches. This course is the first in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5156 and PSY 5157.
PSY/PSJ 5112 The Family Life Cycle
3
Students study individual and family life cycle stages and transitions, including childhood, adolescence, launching, courtship, early marriage, childbirth, divorce, blended families, aging, and death. Human growth, intergenerational theory and multicultural considerations form a framework for the examination of life cycle stages and transitions. Students reflect on clinical applications and implications for self-of-the-therapist development.
PSY/PSJ 5070 Theories and Practices of Community Mental Health
3
This course provides contextual and practical information for working in publicly-funded community settings. Core elements of the community mental health movement and factors essential for working effectively with diverse communities will be initially provided. Using this as a foundation, other core issues will be addressed, including: working with the severely mentally ill; wellness, resilience, and recovery; consumers, families, and community as key partners in collaborative treatment; continuum of care across human services; multicultural competence and accountability; addiction and substance abuse; case management principles; disaster and community trauma response. Appropriate therapeutic models, including effective practices, emerging community practices, and linking interventions to outcomes will also be core to this course.
PSY/PSJ 5000 New Student Orientation
0
This is a required one time orientation to the MA in Counseling Psychology program. It provides essential information needed to navigate the university and program systems by reviewing essential information regarding policies, ethical codes of conduct, community building, and academic expectations. Specific discussion topics include; curriculum requirements, core competencies, comprehensive exams, practicum/internship, graduation requirements, university and department resources and advisement, professional conduct, and an introduction to evidence based practice..
PSY/PSJ 9001 Diversity Awareness Workshop
0
In this workshop, students engage in activities and discussions designed to increase awareness of diversity issues on the personal, social, professional, and systems levels. It is intended to be taken in the first phase of study and must be completed prior to enrollment in PSY5249 or PSY5260 Field Practicum.
Winter - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5156 Theories for MFT Practice II
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5115 This course examines family systems, humanistic, and experiential approaches to include with individuals, couples, and families. Students participate in experiential learning activities to bridge theory and application. This course is the second in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5115 and PSY 5157.
PSY/PSJ 5230 Clinical Skills Training A: Self as Clinician
3
This course focuses on the person of the therapist with an emphasis on one’s own values, beliefs, attitudes, personal biases, and expectations. Students are invited to examine how their personal history has led up to a decision to enter the field of counseling psychology. Through personal reflections and interpersonal interactions students are also invited to consider how their context shapes who they are as individuals, and impacts interactions between self and other. In this class “context” will be examined as one’s personal history, family of origin, cultural dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, religion, and physical ability, as well as community, national, and global realities. Theoretical and experiential learning applies this contextual awareness of self and other to communication and counseling skills. Through experiential activities, students will gain self-awareness, practice foundational counseling skills, and learn about self-disclosure, as both a tool for effective therapeutic change, and as a barrier to clinical treatment.
PSY/PSJ 5054 Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative
3
The Research Methods course provides a brief introduction to various forms of research methods, both quantitative and qualitative. An overview is presented of the quantitative and qualitative research methods and designs applicable to the systematic analysis of the varieties of human behaviors. Scientific problem-solving will be emphasized to include observational techniques and measurement tools, coding, analytic strategies, and reporting of research. Reviews of applications within the psychological literature will be covered. The course will encourage students to focus on research that has been used in their appropriate fields. This course will help in preparing students for the MA research thesis process and will facilitate understanding of research in later work as a practitioner in the field.
Spring - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5157 Theories for MFT Practice III
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5156 This course closely examines cognitive-behavioral, post modern and integrative approaches to individual, couple, and family therapy. Evidence-based treatment models and common factors in research are explored. This course is the third in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5115 and PSY 5156.
PSY/PSJ 5231 Clinical Skills Training B: MFT Techniques I
3
Prereq PSY/PSJ 5230 This course is an introduction to clinical communication processes with individuals, couples, and families. Working within a multicultural context, students interactively learn practical skills for joining with clients, gathering clinical information in early interviews through use of questions and formal assessment methods, such as the genogram, and the mental status exam, and developing early clinical hypotheses linked to theory-based conceptualizations. Includes skills such as listening and tracking, focusing on process vs. content, understanding contributing dynamics, mirroring and reflective listening, interviewing individuals, couples, and families, a systemic evaluation of unit(s) of treatment, and managing therapeutic crises. Students learn how to recognize opportunities for referral and collaboration, and make appropriate use of clinical supervision. This course is the first in the two-quarter sequence with PSY 5232 taken with same instructor.
PSY/PSJ 5635 Ethics and the Law
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5230; Concurrent: PSY/PSJ 5231 Examines legal and ethical issues related to the practice of Marriage and Family Therapy and Professional Clinical Counseling. Class topics include ethical and legal obligations of licensees, legal trends in mental health and family law, professional behavior, and the impact of therapist’s values on practice. Case management, referral practices, confidentiality and privilege, scope of practice, client welfare, and AAMFT, CAMFT, and ACA specific codes of ethics are also covered. Systemic, specific issues such as joint confidentiality, sessions with sub-systems, and separation and divorce are also considered.
Summer - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5303 Child, Adolescent and Family Therapy: Assessment and Treatment A
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5157 This course is part of a two quarter sequence with 5304 & is taken with the same instructor. Part one focuses on the history of assessment & diagnosis using the DSM-5 related to children and adolescents. DSM-5 diagnoses will be explored from various viewpoints through using both formal and informal assessment tools; differential diagnosis; neuropsychology findings; and a bio-psycho-social approach. Topics include developmental theories, case conceptualization and the introduction of treatment planning through a multicultural & systemic lens.
PSY/PSJ 5232 Clinical Skills C: MFT Techniques II
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5231 with same Instructor Students continue to prepare for clinical work with individuals, couples, and families. Supervised role-play and/or videotaped practice sessions are used to help students practice listening and tracking, re-focusing from content to process, mirroring and reflective listening, and creating couple and family enactments. Students practice applying individual and systemic case conceptualizations to the beginning, middle, and end phases of therapy, and formulating clinical approaches using individual and systemic theories of practice. This course is the Third in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5230 and PSY 5231.
PSY/PSJ 5403 Diagnosis and Assessment of Psychopathology A
3
This course is part one of a two-quarter sequence and it examines notions of health and psychopathology from individual, familial, and systemic perspectives. It focuses on the history, development, use, and critique of the DSM-5, with an emphasis on all mental disorders diagnosed except for Personality Disorders (to be discussed in Psychopathology B) and diagnoses designed for children (to be discussed in the Child, Adolescent, and Family Therapy sequence). DSM-5 diagnoses will be explored from various viewpoints, including assessment (formal—such as mental status exam—and informal—such as intake interviews), differential diagnosis, neuropsychology findings, psychopharmacology, and a bio-psycho-social approach. Culturally sensitive diagnosis is included as well as the scope of LPCC and LMFT practice, use of referrals, inter-disciplinary and inter-agency cooperation, and wellness/recovery principles. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence with PSY 5404 taken with same instructor.
PSY/PSJ 9000 Child Abuse Assessment & Reporting Workshop
0
This workshop covers the following topics: recognizing and assessing physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect; legal definitions of child abuse; legal reporting requirements and process; crisis intervention for the victim, families, and abusers; cross-cultural concerns; counter-transference issues; and community resources. It meets the requirement of AB141 for seven hours of training for MFT licensure and must be taken prior to the beginning of field placement.
Fall - Second Year
Units
PSF 5251 Field Practicum 1
1.5
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5304 Child, Adolescent and Family Therapy: Assessment and Treatment B
3
Prerequisite: PSY/PSJ 5303 with same Instructor This course is part two of the child, adolescent and family therapy series. The course examines the theories and practices in working with children and adolescents within individual, systemic, and multicultural contexts. Topics include a variety of clinical techniques and treatment modalities within different theoretical orientations. Students participate in experiential learning activities to bridge theory with application.
PSY/PSJ 5404 Diagnosis and Assessment of Psychopathology B
3
Prerequisite: PSY/PSJ 5403 with same Instructor This is part two of a two-quarter sequence examining, in particular, psychopathologies diagnosed in the category of Personality Disorders of the DSM-5--while simultaneously reviewing all the other categories. Etiology, assessment, and treatment recommendations of personality disorders from multi-theoretical perspectives, including cultural contexts, are explored and critiqued. Dual diagnoses, including co-occurring Substance Induced and Substance Use disorders and their standard screening and assessment instruments, are being discussed.
PSY/PSJ 5620 Multicultural Competence
3
Prerequisite: PSY/PSJ 9001 This course provides specific exposure to core elements in multicultural counseling. The course is specifically designed to enhance students’: a) deepening awareness and appreciation of their own cultural identities through theoretical frameworks; b) understanding of variables that affect therapeutic process and outcomes for diverse individuals, couples, and families; c) knowledge of evidence-based practices, community-defined evidence, and cultural adaptation of effective practices; and d) skills in committing to multicultural competence and sensitivity as an ongoing, developmental process in becoming and practicing as a therapist.
Winter - Second Year
Units
PSF 5252 Field Practicum 2
1.5
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5179 Family Treatment of Addiction
3
This course provides core information about alcohol and drug addiction, including the physical, psychological, and systemic impact they have on individuals, couples, and their families. Compulsive behaviors, such as disordered eating, gambling, and internet addictions, as well as their assessment are included, along with information about etiology, intergenerational patterns, and relapse. Research and assessment on systemic treatment approaches for youth, adults, minorities, and co-occurring disorders are reviewed. Standard screening and assessment instruments for substance use disorders and process addictions are covered. Contemporary strategies, such as abstinence/12-step, motivational interviewing, harm reduction, community-based treatment, and recovery (disease) models are covered. Students will learn about appropriate collaboration with other professionals, and about how to make appropriate referrals.
PSY/PSJ 5247 Clinical Case Seminar
2
Prerequisite: PSF 5251 This course accompanies quarters/sessions 2-4 of a student’s practicum experience (5261-5263 or 5250-5252), and involves formal presentation of ongoing clinical cases. Students will present videotape, audiotape, and/or treatment studies in class, for feedback on case conceptualization, systemic theory application, and treatment planning that is consistent with theoretical orientation. Instructors may also use role play, and other techniques to help students with treatment impasses, illustrate, and practice interventions, etc. Students will learn the application of both individual and systemic theories. This course is also intended to support students in preparing for their Master’s Oral Exam. Limited to students in clinical practice. Students with unsatisfactory progress in this course may be required to take extra quarter(s) beyond the three required for graduation.
PSY/PSJ 5434 Family Violence
2
This course covers violence against children, intimate partners, and the elderly. The following topics are addressed: the shared dynamics associated with violence; recognizing and assessing physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect; legal definitions of child, dependent adult, and elder abuse; legal reporting requirements and process; crisis intervention for victims, families, and abusers; cross-cultural concerns; self-of-therapist issues; and community resources. Culturally sensitive therapeutic theories and interventions are examined. This course satisfies the BBS requirement for 15 hours of coursework in domestic violence for Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Clinical Counselors.
PSY/PSJ 9010 Issues with HIV/AIDS Workshop
0
This course covers the current medical, psychosocial, and mental health needs of clients living with HIV/AIDS, as well as family members, intimate partners, and caretakers. Specific concerns addressed include working with chemically addicted clients, cultural diversity issues including racial and sexual minority clients, legal issues, self-of-therapist issues, and effective models for service delivery and care. Family dynamics that impede or support treatment compliance are included. This course satisfies the BBS requirement for Marriage and Family therapists to complete a course at least seven hours in length that covers the characteristics and methods of assessment and treatment of people living with HIV and AIDS.
Spring - Second Year
Units
PSF 5253 Field Practicum 3
1.5
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5154 Couple Therapy
3
This course introduces students to the modality of couples therapy. Empirically based and non-empirically based models of treatment will be explored. Students will participate in experiential learning activities designed for practicing fundamental clinical skills in couples counseling.
PSY/PSJ 5247 Clinical Case Seminar
2
This course accompanies quarters/sessions 2-4 of a student’s practicum experience (5261-5263 or 5250-5252), and involves formal presentation of ongoing clinical cases. Students will present videotape, audiotape, and/or treatment studies in class, for feedback on case conceptualization, systemic theory application, and treatment planning that is consistent with theoretical orientation. Instructors may also use role play, and other techniques to help students with treatment impasses, illustrate, and practice interventions, etc. Students will learn the application of both individual and systemic theories. This course is also intended to support students in preparing for their Master’s Oral Exam. Limited to students in clinical practice. Students with unsatisfactory progress in this course may be required to take extra quarter(s) beyond the three required for graduation.
PSY/PSJ 5310 Group Therapy
3
Group therapy has gained recognition as an evidence-based approach that is both critically-sound and cost-effective. This course introduces students to both theoretical and experiential understanding of group therapy. The value of multi-couple and multi-family groups is discussed. The class is introduced to psychoeducational (content), interpersonal (process-oriented), or combined (content and process) group approaches. An on-going group experience is required so that students may reflect upon their own interpersonal process to further develop the self of the therapist. An overview of multiple models and techniques are applied in experiential practice, including stages of group development, support group, group leadership, and facilitation styles.
PSY/PSJ 9090 Master’s Written Exam
0
Comprehensive written examination covering material of Phase I to be taken during the first or second quarter of filed working Phase II. Further guidelines are available in the Graduate Psychology office. The written examination must be passed before advancing to Phase III of the program.
PSY/PSJ 9007 Community Based Programs
0
(Concord School-Based Placement Students Only) Students take this workshop when beginning a school based practicum. Students are oriented to the organization and dynamics of working in a school based setting. The politics of working with children and adolescents in the schools is addressed including the legal and ethical issues inherent in the schools. Introduction into the specialized record keeping and procedures of the school based program will be implemented. Information is given regarding assessment and treatment planning in the school system. Students learn how to conduct consultation with the school personnel and parents.
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSF 5254 Field Practicum 4
4
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5613 Human Sexuality
2
This course covers a diverse range of human sexual and intimate behaviors throughout the lifespan. The course examines the impact of gender, race, class, age, health/disability, religion, sexual and gender identity, and sexual behaviors and concerns. Topics include sexual assessment interviewing, treatment models, clinicians’ comfort, and competence. Relevant legal and ethical issues are covered. This course satisfies the BBS requirements for licensure.
PSY/PSJ 5247 Clinical Case Seminar
2
This course accompanies quarters/sessions 2-4 of a student’s practicum experience (5261-5263 or 5250-5252), and involves formal presentation of ongoing clinical cases. Students will present videotape, audiotape, and/or treatment studies in class, for feedback on case conceptualization, systemic theory application, and treatment planning that is consistent with theoretical orientation. Instructors may also use role play, and other techniques to help students with treatment impasses, illustrate, and practice interventions, etc. Students will learn the application of both individual and systemic theories. This course is also intended to support students in preparing for their Master’s Oral Exam. Limited to students in clinical practice. Students with unsatisfactory progress in this course may be required to take extra quarter(s) beyond the three required for graduation.
PSY/PSJ 5167 Brief Therapy
2
This course examines theories and methods of brief therapy from systemic and individual psychotherapy perspectives. Topics include problem identification, goal formulation, languaging, problem solving and solution building. Students will learn philosophical and theoretical premises of approaches, and practice clinical application through experiential activities.
PSY/PSJ 9008 Aging and Long-Term Care Workshop
0
This course offers an overview of mental health issues for older adults. Differential diagnosis of dementia from depression along with the impact of retirement, altered family roles, decline in social and economic status, and increased disability. The psy­chological, social, and financial aspects of long-term care are discussed. Psychodynamic treatment strategies focus on maxi­mizing quality of life and functional capacity for the elderly client, and facilitating collaboration with family, medical personnel, and caregivers. This course satisfies the BBS requirement to complete a minimum of ten hours of coursework in aging and long-term care for California licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist.
PSY/ PSJ 5309 Seminar in MFT
1
These 1-3 unit courses cover specific topics pertaining to the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Each class has a specific focus, such as working with issues in divorce and remarriage, grief and loss, resilience and wellness, medical family therapy, addiction, eating disorders, LGBT clients, expressive arts therapy, advanced child therapy, or advanced couple therapy. MFT Students must complete a total of 3 units of PSY5309. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Recommended for during field practicum.
Winter - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5156 Theories for MFT Practice II
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5115 This course examines family systems, humanistic, and experiential approaches to include with individuals, couples, and families. Students participate in experiential learning activities to bridge theory and application. This course is the second in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5115 and PSY 5157.
PSY/PSJ 5230 Clinical Skills Training A: Self as Clinician
3
This course focuses on the person of the therapist with an emphasis on one’s own values, beliefs, attitudes, personal biases, and expectations. Students are invited to examine how their personal history has led up to a decision to enter the field of counseling psychology. Through personal reflections and interpersonal interactions students are also invited to consider how their context shapes who they are as individuals, and impacts interactions between self and other. In this class “context” will be examined as one’s personal history, family of origin, cultural dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, religion, and physical ability, as well as community, national, and global realities. Theoretical and experiential learning applies this contextual awareness of self and other to communication and counseling skills. Through experiential activities, students will gain self-awareness, practice foundational counseling skills, and learn about self-disclosure, as both a tool for effective therapeutic change, and as a barrier to clinical treatment.
PSY/PSJ 5054 Research Methods: Quantitative and Qualitative
3
The Research Methods course provides a brief introduction to various forms of research methods, both quantitative and qualitative. An overview is presented of the quantitative and qualitative research methods and designs applicable to the systematic analysis of the varieties of human behaviors. Scientific problem-solving will be emphasized to include observational techniques and measurement tools, coding, analytic strategies, and reporting of research. Reviews of applications within the psychological literature will be covered. The course will encourage students to focus on research that has been used in their appropriate fields. This course will help in preparing students for the MA research thesis process and will facilitate understanding of research in later work as a practitioner in the field.
Summer - First Year
Units
PSY/PSJ 5303 Child, Adolescent and Family Therapy: Assessment and Treatment A
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5157 This course is part of a two quarter sequence with 5304 & is taken with the same instructor. Part one focuses on the history of assessment & diagnosis using the DSM-5 related to children and adolescents. DSM-5 diagnoses will be explored from various viewpoints through using both formal and informal assessment tools; differential diagnosis; neuropsychology findings; and a bio-psycho-social approach. Topics include developmental theories, case conceptualization and the introduction of treatment planning through a multicultural & systemic lens.
PSY/PSJ 5232 Clinical Skills C: MFT Techniques II
3
Prereq: PSY/PSJ 5231 with same Instructor Students continue to prepare for clinical work with individuals, couples, and families. Supervised role-play and/or videotaped practice sessions are used to help students practice listening and tracking, re-focusing from content to process, mirroring and reflective listening, and creating couple and family enactments. Students practice applying individual and systemic case conceptualizations to the beginning, middle, and end phases of therapy, and formulating clinical approaches using individual and systemic theories of practice. This course is the Third in the three-quarter sequence with PSY 5230 and PSY 5231.
PSY/PSJ 5403 Diagnosis and Assessment of Psychopathology A
3
This course is part one of a two-quarter sequence and it examines notions of health and psychopathology from individual, familial, and systemic perspectives. It focuses on the history, development, use, and critique of the DSM-5, with an emphasis on all mental disorders diagnosed except for Personality Disorders (to be discussed in Psychopathology B) and diagnoses designed for children (to be discussed in the Child, Adolescent, and Family Therapy sequence). DSM-5 diagnoses will be explored from various viewpoints, including assessment (formal—such as mental status exam—and informal—such as intake interviews), differential diagnosis, neuropsychology findings, psychopharmacology, and a bio-psycho-social approach. Culturally sensitive diagnosis is included as well as the scope of LPCC and LMFT practice, use of referrals, inter-disciplinary and inter-agency cooperation, and wellness/recovery principles. This course is the first of a two-quarter sequence with PSY 5404 taken with same instructor.
PSY/PSJ 9000 Child Abuse Assessment & Reporting Workshop
0
This workshop covers the following topics: recognizing and assessing physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect; legal definitions of child abuse; legal reporting requirements and process; crisis intervention for the victim, families, and abusers; cross-cultural concerns; counter-transference issues; and community resources. It meets the requirement of AB141 for seven hours of training for MFT licensure and must be taken prior to the beginning of field placement.
Winter - Second Year
Units
PSF 5252 Field Practicum 2
1.5
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5179 Family Treatment of Addiction
3
This course provides core information about alcohol and drug addiction, including the physical, psychological, and systemic impact they have on individuals, couples, and their families. Compulsive behaviors, such as disordered eating, gambling, and internet addictions, as well as their assessment are included, along with information about etiology, intergenerational patterns, and relapse. Research and assessment on systemic treatment approaches for youth, adults, minorities, and co-occurring disorders are reviewed. Standard screening and assessment instruments for substance use disorders and process addictions are covered. Contemporary strategies, such as abstinence/12-step, motivational interviewing, harm reduction, community-based treatment, and recovery (disease) models are covered. Students will learn about appropriate collaboration with other professionals, and about how to make appropriate referrals.
PSY/PSJ 5247 Clinical Case Seminar
2
Prerequisite: PSF 5251 This course accompanies quarters/sessions 2-4 of a student’s practicum experience (5261-5263 or 5250-5252), and involves formal presentation of ongoing clinical cases. Students will present videotape, audiotape, and/or treatment studies in class, for feedback on case conceptualization, systemic theory application, and treatment planning that is consistent with theoretical orientation. Instructors may also use role play, and other techniques to help students with treatment impasses, illustrate, and practice interventions, etc. Students will learn the application of both individual and systemic theories. This course is also intended to support students in preparing for their Master’s Oral Exam. Limited to students in clinical practice. Students with unsatisfactory progress in this course may be required to take extra quarter(s) beyond the three required for graduation.
PSY/PSJ 5434 Family Violence
2
This course covers violence against children, intimate partners, and the elderly. The following topics are addressed: the shared dynamics associated with violence; recognizing and assessing physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect; legal definitions of child, dependent adult, and elder abuse; legal reporting requirements and process; crisis intervention for victims, families, and abusers; cross-cultural concerns; self-of-therapist issues; and community resources. Culturally sensitive therapeutic theories and interventions are examined. This course satisfies the BBS requirement for 15 hours of coursework in domestic violence for Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Clinical Counselors.
PSY/PSJ 9010 Issues with HIV/AIDS Workshop
0
This course covers the current medical, psychosocial, and mental health needs of clients living with HIV/AIDS, as well as family members, intimate partners, and caretakers. Specific concerns addressed include working with chemically addicted clients, cultural diversity issues including racial and sexual minority clients, legal issues, self-of-therapist issues, and effective models for service delivery and care. Family dynamics that impede or support treatment compliance are included. This course satisfies the BBS requirement for Marriage and Family therapists to complete a course at least seven hours in length that covers the characteristics and methods of assessment and treatment of people living with HIV and AIDS.
Summer - Second Year
Units
PSF 5254 Field Practicum 4
4
Field experience at a JFK University Community Center that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of community counseling center director required.
PSY/PSJ 5613 Human Sexuality
2
This course covers a diverse range of human sexual and intimate behaviors throughout the lifespan. The course examines the impact of gender, race, class, age, health/disability, religion, sexual and gender identity, and sexual behaviors and concerns. Topics include sexual assessment interviewing, treatment models, clinicians’ comfort, and competence. Relevant legal and ethical issues are covered. This course satisfies the BBS requirements for licensure.
PSY/PSJ 5247 Clinical Case Seminar
2
This course accompanies quarters/sessions 2-4 of a student’s practicum experience (5261-5263 or 5250-5252), and involves formal presentation of ongoing clinical cases. Students will present videotape, audiotape, and/or treatment studies in class, for feedback on case conceptualization, systemic theory application, and treatment planning that is consistent with theoretical orientation. Instructors may also use role play, and other techniques to help students with treatment impasses, illustrate, and practice interventions, etc. Students will learn the application of both individual and systemic theories. This course is also intended to support students in preparing for their Master’s Oral Exam. Limited to students in clinical practice. Students with unsatisfactory progress in this course may be required to take extra quarter(s) beyond the three required for graduation.
PSY/PSJ 5167 Brief Therapy
2
This course examines theories and methods of brief therapy from systemic and individual psychotherapy perspectives. Topics include problem identification, goal formulation, languaging, problem solving and solution building. Students will learn philosophical and theoretical premises of approaches, and practice clinical application through experiential activities.
PSY/PSJ 9008 Aging and Long-Term Care Workshop
0
This course offers an overview of mental health issues for older adults. Differential diagnosis of dementia from depression along with the impact of retirement, altered family roles, decline in social and economic status, and increased disability. The psy­chological, social, and financial aspects of long-term care are discussed. Psychodynamic treatment strategies focus on maxi­mizing quality of life and functional capacity for the elderly client, and facilitating collaboration with family, medical personnel, and caregivers. This course satisfies the BBS requirement to complete a minimum of ten hours of coursework in aging and long-term care for California licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist.
PSY/ PSJ 5309 Seminar in MFT
1
These 1-3 unit courses cover specific topics pertaining to the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Each class has a specific focus, such as working with issues in divorce and remarriage, grief and loss, resilience and wellness, medical family therapy, addiction, eating disorders, LGBT clients, expressive arts therapy, advanced child therapy, or advanced couple therapy. MFT Students must complete a total of 3 units of PSY5309. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Recommended for during field practicum.
Fall - Third Year
Units
PSF 5255 Field Practicum 5
1.5
Field experience in community mental health centers that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of Field Placement Coordinator required.
PSY/PSJ 5120 Specific Theories of Change
3
Prereq: PSF 5253

Child - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with children, adolescents, and their families in MFT and PPC practices. Theory topics regularly offered include Attachment-Based Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Expressive Arts Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR Family - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with individuals, couples, and families in MFT and PCC practice. Theory topics regularly offered include Bowen Therapy, Object Relations Therapy, Structural Family Therapy, Narrative Therapy, Postmodern Therapy, and Gottman Marital Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR, Individual - Explores specific theoretical and evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy and counseling with individuals selected from such schools of thought as Psychodynamic-Psychoanalytic Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical-Behavioral therapy, and Humanistic-Existential Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.
PSY/PSJ 5406 Psychopharmacology
3
Provides a comprehensive overview of psychotropic medication options, including biochemical makeup, function, and possible side effects, utilized to treat mental disorders. Students will be exposed to the basic physiology and function of the brain as it relates to the use of psychotropic medications and basic psychological dysfunctions, e.g., mood disorders, ADHD, ADD, OCD, intermittent explosive disorder, and psychotic disorders. Also examines the increased collaboration among mental health and medical practitioners as psychopharmacological interventions become more common in client populations served by Professional Clinical Counselors.
PSY/PSJ 5309 Seminar in MFT
1
These 1-3 unit courses cover specific topics pertaining to the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Each class has a specific focus, such as working with issues in divorce and remarriage, grief and loss, resilience and wellness, medical family therapy, addiction, eating disorders, LGBT clients, expressive arts therapy, advanced child therapy, or advanced couple therapy. MFT Students must complete a total of 3 units of PSY5309. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Recommended for during field practicum.
PSY/PSJ 9091 Master’s Oral Exam
0
Prereq: PSF 5254, Passed Written Exam Comprehensive oral examination covering material in all phases of the program to be taken in Phase III during the fifth or sixth quarter of practicum. Further guidelines are available at the College of Psychology and Holistic Studies office.
Winter - Third Year
Units
PSF 5256 Field Practicum 6
1.5
Field experience in community mental health centers that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of Field Placement Coordinator required.
PSY/PSJ 5120 Specific Theories of Change
3
Prereq: PSF 5253

Child - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with children, adolescents, and their families in MFT and PPC practices. Theory topics regularly offered include Attachment-Based Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Expressive Arts Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR Family - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with individuals, couples, and families in MFT and PCC practice. Theory topics regularly offered include Bowen Therapy, Object Relations Therapy, Structural Family Therapy, Narrative Therapy, Postmodern Therapy, and Gottman Marital Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR, Individual - Explores specific theoretical and evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy and counseling with individuals selected from such schools of thought as Psychodynamic-Psychoanalytic Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical-Behavioral therapy, and Humanistic-Existential Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.
PSY/PSJ 5309 Seminar in MFT
1
These 1-3 unit courses cover specific topics pertaining to the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Each class has a specific focus, such as working with issues in divorce and remarriage, grief and loss, resilience and wellness, medical family therapy, addiction, eating disorders, LGBT clients, expressive arts therapy, advanced child therapy, or advanced couple therapy. MFT Students must complete a total of 3 units of PSY5309. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Recommended for during field practicum.
PSY/PSJ 5436 Crisis and Trauma
3
This course provides an overview of crisis theory and management, and disaster and trauma causing events and their interventions. Students will learn current strategies for working with individuals, couples, and families impacted by personal, familial, intergenerational, community, and crisis and trauma events. Brief, intermediate, and on-going interventions aimed at reducing traumatic impact, utilizing strengths and resilience, restoring previous levels of function, as well as interventions for addressing delayed, longer-term, or secondary effects of trauma will be presented.
PSY/PSJ 9100 Professional Development: Post Master’s Preparation
0
This meeting formalizes the preparation of paperwork that must be processed as students complete field practicum and change from trainee status to intern status upon graduation. This meeting allows students to reflect upon and bring closure to their graduate experience as they prepare for their future as a practitioner.
PSY/PSJ 9075 Personal Psychotherapy
0
Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their personal development and knowledge of self and to become sensitive to the impact that they have on those around them. Consequently, and consistent with the BBS guidelines for MFT and PCC training, there is a non-credit requirement for at minimum of 50 hours of personal (individual, couple, family, or group) psychotherapy. Students register in the quarter they will complete the requirement or later. Further guidelines are available at the College of Psychology and Holistic Studies office.
Winter - Third Year
Units
PSF 5256 Field Practicum 6
1.5
Field experience in community mental health centers that meets BBS requirements for clinical training experiences for MFT and PCC trainees. Includes one hour of individual supervision and at least two hours of group supervision per week, as well as didactic training and practice application of MFT and PCC assessment and intervention techniques with individuals, couples, and families. Field experience includes the use of audio/video recordings or live supervision of the student’s interactions with clients. Student’s counseling performance will be formally evaluated on an ongoing basis. Completion of Phase I and written consent of Field Placement Coordinator required.
PSY/PSJ 5120 Specific Theories of Change
3
Prereq: PSF 5253

Child - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with children, adolescents, and their families in MFT and PPC practices. Theory topics regularly offered include Attachment-Based Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, and Expressive Arts Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR Family - This course explores in-depth a theoretical approach and application of a specific theory used with individuals, couples, and families in MFT and PCC practice. Theory topics regularly offered include Bowen Therapy, Object Relations Therapy, Structural Family Therapy, Narrative Therapy, Postmodern Therapy, and Gottman Marital Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.

OR, Individual - Explores specific theoretical and evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy and counseling with individuals selected from such schools of thought as Psychodynamic-Psychoanalytic Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical-Behavioral therapy, and Humanistic-Existential Therapy. This course may be repeated for credit with a change of topic.
PSY/PSJ 5309 Seminar in MFT
1
These 1-3 unit courses cover specific topics pertaining to the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Each class has a specific focus, such as working with issues in divorce and remarriage, grief and loss, resilience and wellness, medical family therapy, addiction, eating disorders, LGBT clients, expressive arts therapy, advanced child therapy, or advanced couple therapy. MFT Students must complete a total of 3 units of PSY5309. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic. Recommended for during field practicum.
PSY/PSJ 5436 Crisis and Trauma
3
This course provides an overview of crisis theory and management, and disaster and trauma causing events and their interventions. Students will learn current strategies for working with individuals, couples, and families impacted by personal, familial, intergenerational, community, and crisis and trauma events. Brief, intermediate, and on-going interventions aimed at reducing traumatic impact, utilizing strengths and resilience, restoring previous levels of function, as well as interventions for addressing delayed, longer-term, or secondary effects of trauma will be presented.
PSY/PSJ 9100 Professional Development: Post Master’s Preparation
0
This meeting formalizes the preparation of paperwork that must be processed as students complete field practicum and change from trainee status to intern status upon graduation. This meeting allows students to reflect upon and bring closure to their graduate experience as they prepare for their future as a practitioner.
PSY/PSJ 9075 Personal Psychotherapy
0
Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their personal development and knowledge of self and to become sensitive to the impact that they have on those around them. Consequently, and consistent with the BBS guidelines for MFT and PCC training, there is a non-credit requirement for at minimum of 50 hours of personal (individual, couple, family, or group) psychotherapy. Students register in the quarter they will complete the requirement or later. Further guidelines are available at the College of Psychology and Holistic Studies office.

PROFESSIONAL CLINICAL COUNSELING (PCC) SPECIALIZATION

The following courses are required for the PCC specialization. These 10.5 specialization units along with the 90 core units of coursework, fulfill requirements for the Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology degree with a Specialization in Professional Clinical Counseling.

Course
Units
PSY 5780 - Theories of Career Development
4.5
This course provides an opportunity for students to learn and evaluate several key career development theories and practice how to integrate and apply aspects of theories to their counseling work with diverse client populations. Students will understand the importance of theory in career development and life planning, learn the historical and philosophical perspective of career development, recognize current challenges in existing theories, explore emerging issues and trends, and appreciate the complexity of career choice, decision-making, and satisfaction of clients. This is an online course.
PSY 5405 - Psychological Testing
3
An overview of tests utilized and interpreted in the practice of Professional Clinical Counseling with the goal that students learn to develop referral questions and to review psychological reports conducted by other professionals. Projective tests (Rorschach, TAT), objective tests (Millon, MMPI), and behavioral rating scales (Hamilton, Conners) will be covered with the emphasis on managing and assessing client outcome. Introduces the principles of intellectual and cognitive assessment so that learning disability diagnosis can be discussed. Ethical and legal issues involved in psychological testing including the influences of gender, cultural, and socioeconomic context are included.
Course
Units
PSY 5407 - Recent Advances in Pediatric & Geriatric Psychopharmacology
1.5
This course provides an up to date view of the development in pediatric and geriatric psychotropic research and new medication options. Advanced study of physiology and function of the brain in relation to the use of psychotropic medications and common disorders in youth and aged populations are examined. This course provides the additional 1.5 units for the PPC specialization requirement in Psychopharmacology.
PSY 5646 - Advanced Studies in Research
1.5
Advanced topics and issues concerning research designed to expand student knowledge of the topic beyond the core course through additional learning and/or practical applications. This course meets the requirements for additional units in addiction studies for the LPCC in California. Must be taken either concurrently with or subsequent to PSY 5054. Required for students in the LPCC track, though open to all MFT students.
Course
Units
PSY 5407 - Recent Advances in Pediatric & Geriatric Psychopharmacology
1.5
This course provides an up to date view of the development in pediatric and geriatric psychotropic research and new medication options. Advanced study of physiology and function of the brain in relation to the use of psychotropic medications and common disorders in youth and aged populations are examined. This course provides the additional 1.5 units for the PPC specialization requirement in Psychopharmacology.
PSY 5646 - Advanced Studies in Research
1.5
Advanced topics and issues concerning research designed to expand student knowledge of the topic beyond the core course through additional learning and/or practical applications. This course meets the requirements for additional units in addiction studies for the LPCC in California. Must be taken either concurrently with or subsequent to PSY 5054. Required for students in the LPCC track, though open to all MFT students.

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