Program Overview

The Criminal Justice Concentration in Psychology is concerned with the study of human behavior, particularly as it relates to individuals within the criminal justice system. It is designed to help prepare individuals for careers in criminal justice administration, counseling, corrections, juvenile justice programs, and public welfare agencies.

Program Highlights

Our FlexCourse℠ on-demand online program gives you the freedom to earn your degree at your own pace while still enjoying close interaction with your course instructor.

Criminal Justice Concentration Curriculum

The Bachelor of Arts degree requires a minimum of 120 semester hours of study. Students in this program must complete 54 units of core General Education courses, 42 units within their chosen major, and 24 units of courses from an academic concentration. Transfer students must complete a minimum of 30 units of study at JFKU Online powered by FlexCourse. The Below listed curriculum covers the 24 semester units from the academic concentration.

Criminal Justice
Units
CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
3
This course provides students with an introduction to the criminal justice system in the United States. Emphasis is placed on crime and justice; law and the criminal justice system; police and law enforcement operations; juvenile justice; and contemporary issues in policing, courts, corrections, incarcerations, and reentry. Students will develop an understanding that criminal justice is a complex social system and is a larger part of the broader social, political, and economic systems of the country.
CRJ 150 Corrections
3
This course examines the context, trends, practices, and special interests of corrections. Emphasis is placed on the history and current trends of the practice, jails, the prison experience, institutional management, educational/treatment programs, prisoners’ rights, women in prison, and race/ethnicity challenges.
CRJ 260 Criminology
3
The course is a theoretical study of crime, its causes, and crime prevention and control. The student will examine the field of criminology and develop an understanding for how research models are used to better understand and explain criminal behavior and society’s response.
CRJ 265 Juveniles in the Justice System
3
This course will bring the student with an interest in public safety and criminal justice into the American juvenile justice system. The student will learn about the laws and procedures that govern the way juveniles are handled by the police and the court, the reasons for them, and how to apply them in the everyday discharge of the law enforcement officer’s duty. This course covers the basics of juvenile justice, from entry into the system by way of law enforcement to prosecution, rehabilitation, and corrections.
Criminal Justice
Units
CRJ 350 Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System
3
This course covers the basics of public administration and the ethical issues of public service, including law enforcement, sentencing, corrections criminal justice research, and crime control.
CRJ 360 Criminal Law and Practice
3
This course covers the key components of criminal law and its enforcement. While the primary focus is substantive criminal law including its statutory codification, other topics include an overview of the criminal law process, defenses, and jurisdiction of the courts. The course will examine crimes against persons, property, and peace and order in detail and analyze the essential elements and burdens of proof required for a conviction.
CRJ 370 Criminal Investigation
3
This course is an introduction to criminal investigation and investigative process, policies, and procedures. Current issues in criminal investigations will be studied along with true case studies and applicable US Constitutional law.
CRJ 450 Drugs - Use and Abuse
3
This course serves as an overview of the chemicals that are commonly being abused in our current society. It will address the classes of drug and the effect of each class of drug. It will discuss the common methods of administration, the speed of transmission to the brain, and the neurological impact on the brain. There will also be a brief look at the treatment continuum of care.
Criminal Justice
Units
CRJ 350 Ethical Behavior in the Criminal Justice System
3
This course covers the basics of public administration and the ethical issues of public service, including law enforcement, sentencing, corrections criminal justice research, and crime control.
CRJ 360 Criminal Law and Practice
3
This course covers the key components of criminal law and its enforcement. While the primary focus is substantive criminal law including its statutory codification, other topics include an overview of the criminal law process, defenses, and jurisdiction of the courts. The course will examine crimes against persons, property, and peace and order in detail and analyze the essential elements and burdens of proof required for a conviction.
CRJ 370 Criminal Investigation
3
This course is an introduction to criminal investigation and investigative process, policies, and procedures. Current issues in criminal investigations will be studied along with true case studies and applicable US Constitutional law.
CRJ 450 Drugs - Use and Abuse
3
This course serves as an overview of the chemicals that are commonly being abused in our current society. It will address the classes of drug and the effect of each class of drug. It will discuss the common methods of administration, the speed of transmission to the brain, and the neurological impact on the brain. There will also be a brief look at the treatment continuum of care.

It’s About Tradition

John F. Kennedy University is an accredited nonprofit institution that has been preparing working adults to advance their careers and communities for over 50 years. Offering a variety of innovative, flexible degree programs, we make it possible for busy adults from various walks of life to realize personal and professional growth. We’re committed to providing the full range of support each student needs to change their lives and communities for the better.

The best way to make a change is getting a
good education.

– Mark, John F. Kennedy University College of Law Student