Program Overview

The Associate of Arts in General Studies program provides students with a solid foundation for future educational and career opportunities. Through a broad range of general education courses, students develop their awareness of the key forces of societal change: social, cultural, historical, economic, political, and technological. The Liberal Arts concentration expands on the General Education foundation, exposing students to a variety of subjects while building their writing and critical thinking abilities. This broad base prepares students for a variety of entry-level career opportunities as well as further studies in the humanities or any field of their choosing. *Pending WSCUC approval.

Program Highlights

Our FlexCourse℠ on-demand online program gives you the freedom to earn your degree at your own pace while still enjoying close interaction with your course instructor.

Liberal Arts Concentration Curriculum

The below listed curriculum covers the 15 semester units for the concentration curriculum. Visit the AA Program page for the remaining curriculum.

Liberal Arts
Units
ART 220 Introduction to Film
3
This course introduces students to the fundamental analysis of film in America including building an appreciation for the role of film as a communication tool for political and social commentary. Students will gain a basic understanding of films and the different genres of film.
BIO 151 Introduction to Biology
3
This course introduces the basic principles of biology and demonstrates how relevant science is to everyday life. General biology focuses on the theoretical foundations that form our understanding of the living world. Upon completion, students will possess a broad, conceptual understanding of living organisms from the building blocks of cells to ecosystems.
ENG 204 Interdisciplinary Reading, Writing, and Research
3
This gateway course is designed to refine skills in reading, writing, and critical thinking, and to apply these skills in a multifaceted approach to research in specific disciplines.
Liberal Arts
Units
ENG 348 Modern American Literature
3
This course will introduce students to the various types of writing that occurred in American society through the middle of the nineteenth century from Colonization to American Romanticism. Along with exploring different styles of writing, the course will provide a backdrop of American history to show the motivation of the writers during the time periods in which they wrote. Throughout the course, students will also be introduced to different literary styles. By reading various texts and writing strategies, students will understand how non-fiction, fiction, and poetic works helped to mold American society and how these texts were perceived by others.
HIS 227 Ancient World History
3
This course provides an introduction to the peoples of the ancient world. Students investigate various aspects of ancient world cultures, including geography, politics, history, art, literature, and religion. Students begin to think historically about their world in terms of patterns of human experience and assess the similarities between conditions prevailing in ancient times and those in the current era.
Liberal Arts
Units
ENG 348 Modern American Literature
3
This course will introduce students to the various types of writing that occurred in American society through the middle of the nineteenth century from Colonization to American Romanticism. Along with exploring different styles of writing, the course will provide a backdrop of American history to show the motivation of the writers during the time periods in which they wrote. Throughout the course, students will also be introduced to different literary styles. By reading various texts and writing strategies, students will understand how non-fiction, fiction, and poetic works helped to mold American society and how these texts were perceived by others.
HIS 227 Ancient World History
3
This course provides an introduction to the peoples of the ancient world. Students investigate various aspects of ancient world cultures, including geography, politics, history, art, literature, and religion. Students begin to think historically about their world in terms of patterns of human experience and assess the similarities between conditions prevailing in ancient times and those in the current era.

It’s About Tradition

John F. Kennedy University is an accredited nonprofit institution that has been preparing working adults to advance their careers and communities for over 50 years. Offering a variety of innovative, flexible degree programs, we make it possible for busy adults from various walks of life to realize personal and professional growth. We’re committed to providing the full range of support each student needs to change their lives and communities for the better.

The best way to make a change is getting a
good education.

– Mark, John F. Kennedy University College of Law Student