Juris Doctorate

3,960

Hours of Legal Work Completed by Law Students

92%

of Law Alumni would Choose JFKU Again and Recommend It

470

Clients Served by Our Community Law Clinics Last Year

Overview

Since 1965, John F. Kennedy University’s College of Law has been providing highly motivated students of all ages and life circumstances with the tools they need to succeed in the legal profession.

Our emphasis on social justice and public-interest law allows students to gain valuable legal experience while providing much-needed services to the local community.

Highlights

  • State Bar of California accreditation
  • BarBri-designed California Bar exam prep program (at no additional cost to students)
  • Hands-on training through clinical programs and internships
  • Yellow Ribbon program member, helping to make education more affordable for military veterans

Why JFKU

Hands-on Training through Clinical Programs and Internships

To ensure that each student receives real-world practical experience in the course of his or her legal training and to further our goal of providing legal assistance to the local community, students are required to participate in an internship or one of the College’s highly regarded clinical programs, including:

  • Housing Advocacy Clinic
  • Legal Clinic for Elders

Faculty that Practices what They Teach

The College of Law’s accomplished full-time faculty is supplemented by an adjunct faculty of successful current practitioners, including attorneys and judges, who bring an up-to-the-minute, on-the-ground perspective to classroom learning and who are uniquely situated to introduce our students to the elements of legal practice that go beyond casebooks and theory.

BarBri Bar Review Program

As former Director for Examinations of the State Bar of California, JFK University College of Law’s Dean Barbieri played a key role in developing the California Bar Examination. He has personally worked with faculty to integrate key concepts and exam-taking strategies into the College of Law’s unique bar study program, which is available to all students and included in the cost of the program.

We are JFK University

Our students and alumni come from a diverse variety of professional, educational, and cultural backgrounds but share the desire to achieve more and the motivation to do what it takes to get themselves where they want to be. Our students and alumni include current and former:

  • Law Enforcement Agents
  • Paralegals
  • Military Service Members
  • Financial Services Professionals
  • School Teachers

Curriculum

Fall - First Year
Units
Law 112A Torts A
3
Tort law covers that area of civil law that provides legal remedies for personal injuries and property damage caused by others. Tort law virtually always involves money. Beneath the demand for money is often a desire for respect, mutual recognition, or vindication. Tort cases often involve struggles between profits and safety. Too often, tort cases turn injury and loss into commodified products marketed in the legal system. Tort law says a lot about how society treats each other, how we expect to be treated, who recovers, and who does not. It does not treat all of us the same.
Law 115A Contracts A
3
This course provides an overview of the means by which individuals become subject to contractual obligations; the ways in which contractual terms are interpreted; the methods by which these obligations are satisfied, modified, or revoked; the rights and obligations of non-contracting parties; and the remedies for failure to fulfill contractual duties.
Law 116A Exam Skills Lab A
1
First-year students will be instructed on how to effectively approach law school examination questions and to organize and write law school examination answers. Development of these examination skills will enhance the students’ performance throughout their law school curriculum and assist the students as they prepare for, and take, the California Bar Examination.
Law 117 Legal Methods
2
The primary focus of Legal Methods and Examination Skills is to introduce the structure of legal rhetoric. This is accomplished in the context of planning and writing answers to hypothetical law school examination questions. Students are also introduced to a system for organizing and synthesizing the material of substantive courses and to the resources of the Law Library, particularly those materials useful during the first year. First-year students enrolled in this course entering school in the spring semester will earn three units of credit for this course.
Law 120 Criminal Law
3
The philosophy of criminal responsibility, the laws defining crimes and establishing punishment, and the negation of criminal responsibility by reason of general and special defenses comprise the majority of topics discussed in this course. Particular areas, such as the defenses of mistake, insanity, and intoxication, and the impact of legal doctrine on the actual administration of criminal justice, are also explored.
Spring - First Year
Units
Law 112B Torts B
3
Tort law covers that area of civil law that provides legal remedies for personal injuries and property damage caused by others. Tort law virtually always involves money. Beneath the demand for money is often a desire for respect, mutual recognition, or vindication. Tort cases often involve struggles between profits and safety. Too often, tort cases turn injury and loss into commodified products marketed in the legal system. Tort law says a lot about how society treats each other, how we expect to be treated, who recovers, and who does not. It does not treat all of us the same.
Law 115B Contracts B
3
This course provides an overview of the means by which individuals become subject to contractual obligations; the ways in which contractual terms are interpreted; the methods by which these obligations are satisfied, modified, or revoked; the rights and obligations of non-contracting parties; and the remedies for failure to fulfill contractual duties.
Law 116B Exam Skills Lab B
1
First-year students will be instructed on how to effectively approach law school examination questions and to organize and write law school examination answers. Development of these examination skills will enhance the students’ performance throughout their law school curriculum and assist the students
Law 125 Legal Research and Writing
2
Legal Research and Writing builds on the skills learned in Legal Methods and Examination Skills. Students conduct research in the Law Library, find the law applicable to hypothetical problems, and write memoranda analyzing the rights and obligations of the “clients.”
Law 318 Criminal Procedure
3
An in-depth examination and discussion of the development of federal criminal procedure and the evolution of constitutional case law are utilized and applied to landmark cases. This course focuses primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments and the attendant rights of and limitations upon the individual defendant, law enforcement, the prosecutor, and the criminal defense attorney.
Law 312 Electronic Research
2
This course focuses on organizational strategies for conducting electronic research. Substantial attention is devoted to the specific benefits and challenges of electronic search engines and databases, principally Westlaw. Students learn the features of these tools and how to design and implement effective search strategies.
Electives
Fall - Second Year
Units
Law 212A Real Property A
3
This course covers the traditional scope of property law including land possession, estate interests, landlord and tenant law, concurrent ownership rights and liabilities, and regulatory takings. The course also places special emphasis on modern developments in real property facing today’s practitioner in the areas of conveyance, land use, and finance.
Law 214A Civil Procedure & Skills A
3
Civil Procedure and Skills is the study of the rules of courts. Unlike other substantive courses, Civil Procedure and Skills is not the examination of rights, injuries, and available remedies. Instead, Civil Procedure and Skills is the framework upon which those rights are brought before the tribunal and how to collect on remedies awarded for injury. Topics include jurisdiction, venue, service of process, pleading, discovery, multiparty litigation, pretrial motions, trial, judgments, and appellate procedure. The course covers both federal and California civil procedure.
Law 216A Evidence A
3
Within the context of the California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence, students analyze the nature of judicial proof and consider the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof.
Law 320A Constitutional Law A
3
This course reviews the constitutional system of the United States, including the role of the judiciary; division of powers between the states and the federal government; powers of the president and Congress; limitations on the powers of government for the protection of life, liberty, and property; federal and state citizenship; and the constitutional protection of individual rights.
Electives
Spring - Second Year
Units
Law 212B Real Property B
3
This course covers the traditional scope of property law including land possession, estate interests, landlord and tenant law, concurrent ownership rights and liabilities, and regulatory takings. The course also places special emphasis on modern developments in real property facing today’s practitioner in the areas of conveyance, land use, and finance.
Law 214B Civil Procedure & Skills B
3
Civil Procedure and Skills is the study of the rules of courts. Unlike other substantive courses, Civil Procedure and Skills is not the examination of rights, injuries, and available remedies. Instead, Civil Procedure and Skills is the framework upon which those rights are brought before the tribunal and how to collect on remedies awarded for injury. Topics include jurisdiction, venue, service of process, pleading, discovery, multiparty litigation, pretrial motions, trial, judgments, and appellate procedure. The course covers both federal and California civil procedure.
Law 216B Evidence B
2
Within the context of the California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence, students analyze the nature of judicial proof and consider the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof.
Law 320B Constitutional Law B
3
This course reviews the constitutional system of the United States, including the role of the judiciary; division of powers between the states and the federal government; powers of the president and Congress; limitations on the powers of government for the protection of life, liberty, and property; federal and state citizenship; and the constitutional protection of individual rights.
Electives
Summer - Second Year
Units
Law 310 Trial Advocacy
3
This course engages students in practical exercises designed to develop students’ familiarity with trial procedures, including pretrial motions, jury selection, opening statements, presentation of documentary and testimonial evidence, and closing arguments. During these exercises, students are required to employ the rules of evidence, both California and federal, necessary to successfully bring and defend pretrial motions, to raise and respond to objections at trial, and to conduct other stages of the trial. (Students who have completed one of the on-campus clinical programs (Housing Advocacy, Legal Clinic for Elders, or Children, Families & the Law Internship), or who have completed a significant off-campus internship placement with demonstrated experience in litigation and/or appellate practice, may seek a waiver of EITHER Trial Advocacy or Appellate Advocacy. If approved, the waiver relieves the student of the requirement that credit be earned in the waived course. Waiver of a course does NOT confer unit credit.)
Electives
Fall - Third Year
Units
Law 315 Wills and Trusts
3
This course examines the law of intestate succession; the drafting, execution, revocation, and revival of wills; the nature of trusts; selected aspects of the law of future interests; and the creation of durable powers of attorney and other vehicles for establishing family rights and protections.
Law 414 Appellate Advocacy
3
In this course, students study appellate practice and procedure, the appellate process, appellate court rules, writ practice, and strategies for structuring a case for appellate review. Students prepare and submit a formal appellate brief and participate in an oral argument competition. (Students who have completed one of the on-campus clinical programs (Housing Advocacy, Legal Clinic for Elders, or Children, Families & the Law Internship), or who have completed a significant off-campus internship placement with demonstrated experience in litigation and/or appellate practice, may seek a waiver of EITHER Trial Advocacy or Appellate Advocacy. If approved, the waiver relieves the student of the requirement that credit be earned in the waived course. Waiver of a course does NOT confer unit credit.)
Law 418 Professional Responsibility
2
This course explores the modern challenges to fulfilling the attorney’s professional responsibility and the far more profound dilemmas facing a responsible attorney seeking to practice ethically and to adhere to the highest professional values in the 21st century. Topics include organization and regulation of the legal profession; canons of ethics; disciplinary measures; the lawyer’s responsibility to clients, the community, and the profession; and the obligation of judges to remain impartial and independent.
Law 425 Business Associations
3
In addition to covering the basic principles governing sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, this course reviews the law of agency, state corporation laws, and federal and state securities laws that regulate public and closed corporations. The course also examines the processes and systems that provide for the issuance of shares, corporate structure and governance, the liability of corporate managers, and restrictions on dividends and distributions.
Electives
Spring - Third Year
Units
Law 313 Community Property
2
This course examines the California community property system, including general principles of classifying marital property, management and control of community property, liability of marital property for debts and torts of the spouses, and division of community property on dissolution or death.
Law 420 Remedies
3
This course identifies and distinguishes the types of recovery available to a plaintiff for both legal and equitable relief, including the study of the viability of monetary damages, specific performance, injunctive relief, and other recovery in tort, contract, real property, and constitutional law.
Law 428 Advanced Legal Writing
2
Advanced Legal Writing focuses on a variety of advanced legal writing topics, including drafting solutions to client problems and refining skills in issue identification and written analysis.
Electives
Spring - First Year
Units
Law 112B Torts B
3
Tort law covers that area of civil law that provides legal remedies for personal injuries and property damage caused by others. Tort law virtually always involves money. Beneath the demand for money is often a desire for respect, mutual recognition, or vindication. Tort cases often involve struggles between profits and safety. Too often, tort cases turn injury and loss into commodified products marketed in the legal system. Tort law says a lot about how society treats each other, how we expect to be treated, who recovers, and who does not. It does not treat all of us the same.
Law 115B Contracts B
3
This course provides an overview of the means by which individuals become subject to contractual obligations; the ways in which contractual terms are interpreted; the methods by which these obligations are satisfied, modified, or revoked; the rights and obligations of non-contracting parties; and the remedies for failure to fulfill contractual duties.
Law 116B Exam Skills Lab B
1
First-year students will be instructed on how to effectively approach law school examination questions and to organize and write law school examination answers. Development of these examination skills will enhance the students’ performance throughout their law school curriculum and assist the students
Law 125 Legal Research and Writing
2
Legal Research and Writing builds on the skills learned in Legal Methods and Examination Skills. Students conduct research in the Law Library, find the law applicable to hypothetical problems, and write memoranda analyzing the rights and obligations of the “clients.”
Law 318 Criminal Procedure
3
An in-depth examination and discussion of the development of federal criminal procedure and the evolution of constitutional case law are utilized and applied to landmark cases. This course focuses primarily on the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Fourteenth Amendments and the attendant rights of and limitations upon the individual defendant, law enforcement, the prosecutor, and the criminal defense attorney.
Law 312 Electronic Research
2
This course focuses on organizational strategies for conducting electronic research. Substantial attention is devoted to the specific benefits and challenges of electronic search engines and databases, principally Westlaw. Students learn the features of these tools and how to design and implement effective search strategies.
Electives
Spring - Second Year
Units
Law 212B Real Property B
3
This course covers the traditional scope of property law including land possession, estate interests, landlord and tenant law, concurrent ownership rights and liabilities, and regulatory takings. The course also places special emphasis on modern developments in real property facing today’s practitioner in the areas of conveyance, land use, and finance.
Law 214B Civil Procedure & Skills B
3
Civil Procedure and Skills is the study of the rules of courts. Unlike other substantive courses, Civil Procedure and Skills is not the examination of rights, injuries, and available remedies. Instead, Civil Procedure and Skills is the framework upon which those rights are brought before the tribunal and how to collect on remedies awarded for injury. Topics include jurisdiction, venue, service of process, pleading, discovery, multiparty litigation, pretrial motions, trial, judgments, and appellate procedure. The course covers both federal and California civil procedure.
Law 216B Evidence B
2
Within the context of the California Evidence Code and the Federal Rules of Evidence, students analyze the nature of judicial proof and consider the theory and application of the rules regulating the admission and exclusion of testimonial and documentary proof.
Law 320B Constitutional Law B
3
This course reviews the constitutional system of the United States, including the role of the judiciary; division of powers between the states and the federal government; powers of the president and Congress; limitations on the powers of government for the protection of life, liberty, and property; federal and state citizenship; and the constitutional protection of individual rights.
Electives
Fall - Third Year
Units
Law 315 Wills and Trusts
3
This course examines the law of intestate succession; the drafting, execution, revocation, and revival of wills; the nature of trusts; selected aspects of the law of future interests; and the creation of durable powers of attorney and other vehicles for establishing family rights and protections.
Law 414 Appellate Advocacy
3
In this course, students study appellate practice and procedure, the appellate process, appellate court rules, writ practice, and strategies for structuring a case for appellate review. Students prepare and submit a formal appellate brief and participate in an oral argument competition. (Students who have completed one of the on-campus clinical programs (Housing Advocacy, Legal Clinic for Elders, or Children, Families & the Law Internship), or who have completed a significant off-campus internship placement with demonstrated experience in litigation and/or appellate practice, may seek a waiver of EITHER Trial Advocacy or Appellate Advocacy. If approved, the waiver relieves the student of the requirement that credit be earned in the waived course. Waiver of a course does NOT confer unit credit.)
Law 418 Professional Responsibility
2
This course explores the modern challenges to fulfilling the attorney’s professional responsibility and the far more profound dilemmas facing a responsible attorney seeking to practice ethically and to adhere to the highest professional values in the 21st century. Topics include organization and regulation of the legal profession; canons of ethics; disciplinary measures; the lawyer’s responsibility to clients, the community, and the profession; and the obligation of judges to remain impartial and independent.
Law 425 Business Associations
3
In addition to covering the basic principles governing sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations, this course reviews the law of agency, state corporation laws, and federal and state securities laws that regulate public and closed corporations. The course also examines the processes and systems that provide for the issuance of shares, corporate structure and governance, the liability of corporate managers, and restrictions on dividends and distributions.
Electives